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mtnNurse.

mtnNurse. BSN

Reputation Activity by mtnNurse.

Reactions Given

Like 260
Thanks 11
Haha 10
Disagree 13
Sad 3

Reactions Received

Like 197
Thanks 13
Disagree 5

  1. Like
    mtnNurse., BSN got a reaction from Kallie3006, ADN in A year and a half into ICU nursing and still not feeling like I'm getting it   
    Oh my gosh, has someone really accused older, experienced nurses of being jealous of the young'ns good looks?! Absurd if so! 😆 
    I feel for this new nurse who is sensitive and wants what she said those "millennials" want regarding feedback, and my heart goes out also to the older, experienced nurses. I honestly can't imagine how anyone could work as a nurse in this country for decades and not become bitter, and if one of you has managed to do so then you are a hero (well, you're probably a hero even if you have some bitterness too)! I would want you for my nurse!!! If I were a patient (knock on wood), I would take an older, bitter, highly experienced nurse any day over a young, inexperienced one who doesn't understand how to prioritize appropriately yet and might fluff my pillows or instantly bring me coffee but won't instantly recognize it if I get sepsis. I think one of the biggest problems in hospitals is not having enough older experienced nurses who are given enough time to properly train new nurses. In many places of work, it's the blind leading the blind because conditions are so bad that experienced nurses flee.
    I really think nursing schools would do a great benefit to students to devote an entire class on training new nurses to develop the "tough skin" needed to survive in real-world nursing jobs. It takes tough skin to handle abusive patients and also to advocate for patients. It takes tough skin to handle stressed co-workers. It takes tough skin to handle understaffed hospitals and to know where your limitations are. And it takes tough skin to stand up to bosses when they demand you do so much work that you are no longer able to give adequate care to each patient.
    Anyhow, god bless all you older, experienced, bitter nurses in the world and know that many people have been grateful for your service and kept alive because of it!!!
  2. Like
    mtnNurse., BSN got a reaction from Oldmahubbard in I Hope This is Not the Latest Trend   
    Well, thank you then for your best intentions. I would like to be polite to you too and from what I've seen you post before, you are intelligent and also an experienced and good nurse. 
    I do get annoyed with posts I've seen among recent threads (not necessarily yours) that imply that someone who defends a nurse from criminality must have self-interest involved. I thankfully removed myself from working in a hospital that demanded to give staff too many patients and every nurse there felt it was unsafe. And I most likely will not put myself back into a situation like that again. As one person put it "I'd rather dumpster dive". So I have no self-interest involved when I seek to defend nurses from criminality. 
    I do think all of us who disagree are ultimately on "the same side". We are all nurses. We all care about people. We all want our patients to be safe. We all want good working environments, reasonable work expectations, safe nurse-to-patient ratios. We all want a good job and nice work-life balance. I think that most or all of us know that most nursing jobs do not give us these things that we deserve as nurses, as workers. I hope we can all work to change that.
  3. Like
    mtnNurse., BSN got a reaction from morelostthanfound, BSN in I Hope This is Not the Latest Trend   
    THANK YOU for your honest post showing compassion for fellow nurses who work in horrible conditions!!!
    If you are a nurse who has been blessed enough to never have had to work in such conditions, or never have experienced the desperation of needing a job to survive, find it in yourself to imagine what that would be like, find your compassion for these people, and ask yourself if the world is better that they are criminalized. Please.
  4. Thanks
    mtnNurse., BSN got a reaction from Fiona59 in I Hope This is Not the Latest Trend   
    THANK YOU for your honest post, and I repeat your questions to every nurse who thinks they could've done better: "How in the hell is it humanely possible to care for 40 people? Even if you were so inclined to be a good, conscientious nurse, how would you accomplish it?"
    If your answer is to quit the job, I agree with you -- but what do we advise people who say they NEED THE JOB?
    Calling all nurses who could've done better: answer the question in bold keeping in mind you have 30-40 patients. 
    Oh, blondnurse12, don't forget that people are enraged but they are indeed doing something to fix it: just arrest all the nurses who wanted to do what was required to keep their job because they needed a job but who couldn't possibly meet the impossible demands of the job...won't that fix it, just put the nurses in jail? 🤨 
    Attention fellow nurses who are fed up with all those bad, bad nurses doing the best they can at jobs that set them up to fail: If one day it finally occurs to you that we can put as many nurses in jail as you want and that doesn't fix the tragic problems that will keep occurring at understaffed facilities -- then consider channeling your anger, passion, time, and energy to improving the work conditions that cause subpar nursing care. 
  5. Like
    mtnNurse., BSN got a reaction from Kallie3006, ADN in A year and a half into ICU nursing and still not feeling like I'm getting it   
    Oh my gosh, has someone really accused older, experienced nurses of being jealous of the young'ns good looks?! Absurd if so! 😆 
    I feel for this new nurse who is sensitive and wants what she said those "millennials" want regarding feedback, and my heart goes out also to the older, experienced nurses. I honestly can't imagine how anyone could work as a nurse in this country for decades and not become bitter, and if one of you has managed to do so then you are a hero (well, you're probably a hero even if you have some bitterness too)! I would want you for my nurse!!! If I were a patient (knock on wood), I would take an older, bitter, highly experienced nurse any day over a young, inexperienced one who doesn't understand how to prioritize appropriately yet and might fluff my pillows or instantly bring me coffee but won't instantly recognize it if I get sepsis. I think one of the biggest problems in hospitals is not having enough older experienced nurses who are given enough time to properly train new nurses. In many places of work, it's the blind leading the blind because conditions are so bad that experienced nurses flee.
    I really think nursing schools would do a great benefit to students to devote an entire class on training new nurses to develop the "tough skin" needed to survive in real-world nursing jobs. It takes tough skin to handle abusive patients and also to advocate for patients. It takes tough skin to handle stressed co-workers. It takes tough skin to handle understaffed hospitals and to know where your limitations are. And it takes tough skin to stand up to bosses when they demand you do so much work that you are no longer able to give adequate care to each patient.
    Anyhow, god bless all you older, experienced, bitter nurses in the world and know that many people have been grateful for your service and kept alive because of it!!!
  6. Thanks
    mtnNurse., BSN got a reaction from Psychnursehopeful in RaDonda Vaught’s Arraignment - Guilty or Not of Reckless Homicide and Patient Abuse?   
    Thank you for posting this to further the discussion of a case for which there is much to be learned.
    It should be the BON's job and not the DA's or criminal court's to determine how RV should be held accountable for failing in all the ways she did to adhere to professional standards of practice. If anyone should sanction RV, it should be the BON rather than the criminal court.
    Not caring and accidentally not thinking are two very different things. Ever heard of the possibility of good people not paying attention when they should have? It happens to all of us at one time or another, and as far as I know it is humanly impossible to never enter into "auto-pilot" at some point in time in your life, even when you are doing something for which the risk requires full attention. 
    I do agree bad nurses might be "liked" and good nurses "disliked" by patients and coworkers. But I reckon if people had said about her that she was always hateful and mean it might make people wonder if she'd done it on purpose (which nobody so far has thought) -- so knowing how people felt can help influence whether people conclude she made an honest mistake(s) or not.
    I'm glad you are aware all hospitals are flawed; I don't know that, but it is very much my strong suspicion that is true because I've never seen or heard of a perfect one. Because I strongly believe that, I don't doubt there is plenty that happened in RV's working environment and circumstances leading up to the accident which contributed to the accident through no fault of her own. I agree she erred in ways where she should also be held accountable and not solely the hospital. But it's the BON's job to hold nurses accountable when they make mistakes or stray from standards of practice in the course of attempting to do their jobs in a well-meaning way. RV is not a criminal for her accident. Nurses and all caregivers deserve better than to be criminalized for accidents; their jobs entail risking their own lives and the lives of their patients in efforts to heal and save their patients. 
  7. Like
    mtnNurse., BSN got a reaction from Oldmahubbard in I Hope This is Not the Latest Trend   
    Well, I could reply that you continue to make a flawed emotional argument about why we should criminalize our fellow nurses when they stray from standards of practice in attempts to keep jobs which make impossible demands of them. But I don't claim your argument is flawed; I just disagree. We both have the right to our opinions and I'm interested in others' opinions, even when they disagree.
    I believe the BON should handle accidents and negligence. A nurse's job, and doctor's, and other caregivers, comes with inherent risks to harm and kill while they are attempting to heal and save. Licensing agencies should handle the caregivers' accidents, negligence, and their straying from standards of practice when the caregivers were just trying to do their job. 
    Criminal charges should be reserved for the true criminals; those with intent to commit a crime; those with malice and intent. If what I'm saying "puts nurses above the law", then it's past time to change the law!
    Our caregivers deserve better than to be hauled away in handcuffs when they were well-meaning and trying to do their jobs. If their places of work betrayed them by making impossible demands, and that leads to the nurses having an accident or overlooking something or straying from standards of practice in an effort to do their jobs -- then that is something for licensing agencies to handle, not the criminal justice system. 
  8. Haha
    mtnNurse., BSN reacted to Mrs.D. in 2019 Nursing Salary Survey   
    Woohoo! I can finally take the survey 🤗🤗. New grad, RN, fresh off of 3-month hospital orientation, present! 🙋🏼‍♀️
  9. Like
    mtnNurse., BSN reacted to NurseSpeedy, ADN, LPN, RN in How to retain nurses?   
    Oh, they’ll have an answer for that: we need to focus on our time management skills...eye roll.
  10. Like
    mtnNurse., BSN got a reaction from Oldmahubbard in I Hope This is Not the Latest Trend   
    Well, thank you then for your best intentions. I would like to be polite to you too and from what I've seen you post before, you are intelligent and also an experienced and good nurse. 
    I do get annoyed with posts I've seen among recent threads (not necessarily yours) that imply that someone who defends a nurse from criminality must have self-interest involved. I thankfully removed myself from working in a hospital that demanded to give staff too many patients and every nurse there felt it was unsafe. And I most likely will not put myself back into a situation like that again. As one person put it "I'd rather dumpster dive". So I have no self-interest involved when I seek to defend nurses from criminality. 
    I do think all of us who disagree are ultimately on "the same side". We are all nurses. We all care about people. We all want our patients to be safe. We all want good working environments, reasonable work expectations, safe nurse-to-patient ratios. We all want a good job and nice work-life balance. I think that most or all of us know that most nursing jobs do not give us these things that we deserve as nurses, as workers. I hope we can all work to change that.
  11. Thanks
    mtnNurse., BSN reacted to Oldmahubbard in I Hope This is Not the Latest Trend   
    As a former RN in LTC,  I am astonished that these type of charges are so rarely brought. Because extreme neglect goes on all the time in LTC. Every day. In every state, and every city.
    I couldn't leave. There was no money in the bank. We would have lost our house.
    The criminals are the owners.
  12. Like
    mtnNurse., BSN reacted to Persephone Paige, ADN in I Hope This is Not the Latest Trend   
    This was my point too. These places should not exist. But, it's an industry. The insurances are in on it, the owners. They KNOW these patients don't get good care, but they keep cashing the checks. And hiring minimal staff... God forbid they hire more nurses, might cut into their profits.
  13. Like
    mtnNurse., BSN got a reaction from Oldmahubbard in I Hope This is Not the Latest Trend   
    I agree, that is good advice to tell nurses to be willing to quit or be fired rather than continue to work with unsafe work loads or to be willing to cut corners to meet impossible work demands. That is what we most have in our power to do..."vote with our feet" as they say. But is that all the solutions we have for nurses in today's work environments? 
  14. Like
    mtnNurse., BSN got a reaction from Oldmahubbard in I Hope This is Not the Latest Trend   
    Wow. I know you don't think you are a super nurse, but if you can pass all meds, check for wounds, and do all other care and charting for that many patients then in my book you are not just super-nurse, you are super human! If I could watch a video of how someone gets it all done in such circumstances, I'm sure I would learn a lot. I don't know how it's physically or mentally possible. So how many patients or how much work would be too much for you to be able to get it done? And if you were given too much, I highly commend that you would not take shortcuts -- I'm guessing the advice would be tell bosses it's impossible if it is and be willing to quit or be fired if demanded to do an unsafe work load. That's good advice. Any advice for those who say leaving a needed job is easier said than done?
    Here's where we might hit our dead-end of useful back and forth, because I understand you think we should criminalize those nurses...and I don't think so. BON should handle mistakes and negligence; leave criminal laws for criminals.
  15. Like
    mtnNurse., BSN got a reaction from Oldmahubbard in I Hope This is Not the Latest Trend   
    Well, thank you then for your best intentions. I would like to be polite to you too and from what I've seen you post before, you are intelligent and also an experienced and good nurse. 
    I do get annoyed with posts I've seen among recent threads (not necessarily yours) that imply that someone who defends a nurse from criminality must have self-interest involved. I thankfully removed myself from working in a hospital that demanded to give staff too many patients and every nurse there felt it was unsafe. And I most likely will not put myself back into a situation like that again. As one person put it "I'd rather dumpster dive". So I have no self-interest involved when I seek to defend nurses from criminality. 
    I do think all of us who disagree are ultimately on "the same side". We are all nurses. We all care about people. We all want our patients to be safe. We all want good working environments, reasonable work expectations, safe nurse-to-patient ratios. We all want a good job and nice work-life balance. I think that most or all of us know that most nursing jobs do not give us these things that we deserve as nurses, as workers. I hope we can all work to change that.
  16. Like
    mtnNurse., BSN got a reaction from Oldmahubbard in I Hope This is Not the Latest Trend   
    Well, I could reply that you continue to make a flawed emotional argument about why we should criminalize our fellow nurses when they stray from standards of practice in attempts to keep jobs which make impossible demands of them. But I don't claim your argument is flawed; I just disagree. We both have the right to our opinions and I'm interested in others' opinions, even when they disagree.
    I believe the BON should handle accidents and negligence. A nurse's job, and doctor's, and other caregivers, comes with inherent risks to harm and kill while they are attempting to heal and save. Licensing agencies should handle the caregivers' accidents, negligence, and their straying from standards of practice when the caregivers were just trying to do their job. 
    Criminal charges should be reserved for the true criminals; those with intent to commit a crime; those with malice and intent. If what I'm saying "puts nurses above the law", then it's past time to change the law!
    Our caregivers deserve better than to be hauled away in handcuffs when they were well-meaning and trying to do their jobs. If their places of work betrayed them by making impossible demands, and that leads to the nurses having an accident or overlooking something or straying from standards of practice in an effort to do their jobs -- then that is something for licensing agencies to handle, not the criminal justice system. 
  17. Like
    mtnNurse., BSN got a reaction from Oldmahubbard in I Hope This is Not the Latest Trend   
    ??? I thought you were prone to more intelligent discussions rather than getting personal, so I'm surprised by your response and would very much like this thread and others to stay on point and not get personal. No, I have my dream nursing job actually, and love it. I am very lucky. 
    I'm passionate about the rights of working class people, I'm passionate about caregivers, and I would love to live in a country where we take care of our caregivers. I'd love to live in a country where we don't criminalize our caregivers when they were just trying to meet impossible work demands. I will keep discussing it because this is a public forum and where others have the right to call for handcuffs on their fellow nurses, I have the right to state my opinions of why they shouldn't be criminalized.
  18. Like
    mtnNurse., BSN got a reaction from Oldmahubbard in I Hope This is Not the Latest Trend   
    I agree, that is good advice to tell nurses to be willing to quit or be fired rather than continue to work with unsafe work loads or to be willing to cut corners to meet impossible work demands. That is what we most have in our power to do..."vote with our feet" as they say. But is that all the solutions we have for nurses in today's work environments? 
  19. Like
    mtnNurse., BSN got a reaction from Oldmahubbard in I Hope This is Not the Latest Trend   
    Wow. I know you don't think you are a super nurse, but if you can pass all meds, check for wounds, and do all other care and charting for that many patients then in my book you are not just super-nurse, you are super human! If I could watch a video of how someone gets it all done in such circumstances, I'm sure I would learn a lot. I don't know how it's physically or mentally possible. So how many patients or how much work would be too much for you to be able to get it done? And if you were given too much, I highly commend that you would not take shortcuts -- I'm guessing the advice would be tell bosses it's impossible if it is and be willing to quit or be fired if demanded to do an unsafe work load. That's good advice. Any advice for those who say leaving a needed job is easier said than done?
    Here's where we might hit our dead-end of useful back and forth, because I understand you think we should criminalize those nurses...and I don't think so. BON should handle mistakes and negligence; leave criminal laws for criminals.
  20. Like
    mtnNurse., BSN reacted to tnbutterfly, BSN, RN in RaDonda Vaught’s Arraignment - Guilty or Not of Reckless Homicide and Patient Abuse?   
    A group of nurses plans to appear in their scrubs at Vaught's arraignment hearing on February 20th show their support. Included in this group is Janie Harvey Garner, founder of Show Me Your Stethoscope.  
    For those who are interested in showing their support by attending the arraignment, here are the details:
    When?
    Wednesday, February 20 @ 9:00 AM
    Where?
    Justice A. A. Birch Building
    408 2nd Ave N,
    Court Room 6D
    Nashville, TN 37201
    Judge: Jennifer Smith
    What is Arraignment?
    Once the accused is represented by counsel, the more formal part of the arraignment, the reading of the charges, takes place.  The accused is expected to enter a plea: usually guilty, not guilty, or no contest. The no-contest plea means that the accused is not admitting guilt but will not contest the charges. 
    What is the verdict going to be???
    In the following video, Janie Harvey Garner talks more about the arraignment process. 
    Related content:
    Nurse Gives Lethal Dose of Vecuronium Instead of Versed
    Nurse Charged With Homicide
    Nurses Call the Governor of Tennessee
  21. Like
    mtnNurse., BSN reacted to tnbutterfly, BSN, RN in RaDonda Vaught’s Arraignment - Guilty or Not of Reckless Homicide and Patient Abuse?   
    UPDATE
    About 3 dozen nurses showed up at the arraignment wearing scrubs.  Radonda introduced her supporters stating, "This is my family."
    Vaught entered a not guilty plea and is already out on bail.  News sources reported that $43,000 has been raised for her legal defense.
  22. Like
    mtnNurse., BSN reacted to tonyl1234 in I Hope This is Not the Latest Trend   
    Before coming to nursing school, I was in a field that had risks of losing my license, it had risks of prison if I got in an accident that caused ANY injury if I had to act illegally for my job.   Know what I did?  I didn't act illegally.  A new job in my old field and definitely in nursing can be as easy as a phone call away.  If you're willing to travel, there's always a high paying job for pretty much anyone in this country.  Maybe you'll have to travel for a few months, it's not the end of the world.  Travel jobs WILL hire you, because most people do not want to travel.  It's horrible.  But it's a job.
    You have the law on your side.  You can only be in one place at a time.  Can't check over a patient to look for wounds?  It happens.  Don't say that you did.  But don't make it a habit of not being able to at least do a quick half-assed check of a patient to check for anything majorly wrong, especially if you're in a hospital where checking their skin takes maybe 20 seconds to glance over it and see if anything stands out thanks to them being in gowns.  Or in a nursing home, maybe a minute.  30 minutes of your day spread across 8 to 12 hours, I'm sure you can find time.  You've been looking at skin analytically for years, after spending your entire life having skin.  It's not hard to notice a gaping hole and think "that's not right."
    And if you're in a situation where you're dangerously understaffed, demand that they make calls to get coverage.  If your state only allows 15 patients to one nurse in a LTC, you usually have a legal right to refuse to accept more than 15.  Know your state's staffing laws.  It's illegal to force you to do something illegal (though there's occasionally exceptions for declared emergencies, but that gets a little more complex.  But staffing is rarely an exception).  Read your laws, know what you can do about being expected to take on more patients than what's safe, know what you can do about being expected to sign off in work you never did.  The law is the most useful tool you have for protecting your job, your license, and your freedom.
    That said, the nurses in the example, I have no sympathy for them.  Forging the signatures, that's painfully obviously wrong.  And you're allowed to refuse to, even if it means that a patient dies because of not getting a vital medication, you're covered because there was no signed order.  Never forge a signature, because if there's ANY mistake, "that's not what the doctor said."  Lying on the records, again, just don't do it.  If you didn't do it, don't say you did.  Here's what the law sees: They assessed everything, found something wrong, but chose to pretend they didn't.  If you couldn't do it, note that you couldn't and why.  If you don't have time to assess a patient, tell your charge nurse, or your director, or an administrator, all the way up to the doctor.  Get SOMEONE to do it, and note that you did.  If you find a wound and either don't have time to address it or have no clue what you're doing, do the same exact thing.  If you're really in bind, if you're working in a hospital, call the wound team.  If you're working in a LTC, call for transport to an ER.  Literally as long as you do more than nothing, you're covered.
    If you get fired, you get fired.  You're in demand, you'll find a new job fast.  You'll have unemployment.  Most states are awesome about any PTO that it's considered unpaid pay, so you should get a check for everything you had saved.  You'll be fine for a couple weeks.  And then you'll be back to normal.  It's way better than prison.
  23. Like
    mtnNurse., BSN got a reaction from Kallie3006, ADN in A year and a half into ICU nursing and still not feeling like I'm getting it   
    Oh my gosh, has someone really accused older, experienced nurses of being jealous of the young'ns good looks?! Absurd if so! 😆 
    I feel for this new nurse who is sensitive and wants what she said those "millennials" want regarding feedback, and my heart goes out also to the older, experienced nurses. I honestly can't imagine how anyone could work as a nurse in this country for decades and not become bitter, and if one of you has managed to do so then you are a hero (well, you're probably a hero even if you have some bitterness too)! I would want you for my nurse!!! If I were a patient (knock on wood), I would take an older, bitter, highly experienced nurse any day over a young, inexperienced one who doesn't understand how to prioritize appropriately yet and might fluff my pillows or instantly bring me coffee but won't instantly recognize it if I get sepsis. I think one of the biggest problems in hospitals is not having enough older experienced nurses who are given enough time to properly train new nurses. In many places of work, it's the blind leading the blind because conditions are so bad that experienced nurses flee.
    I really think nursing schools would do a great benefit to students to devote an entire class on training new nurses to develop the "tough skin" needed to survive in real-world nursing jobs. It takes tough skin to handle abusive patients and also to advocate for patients. It takes tough skin to handle stressed co-workers. It takes tough skin to handle understaffed hospitals and to know where your limitations are. And it takes tough skin to stand up to bosses when they demand you do so much work that you are no longer able to give adequate care to each patient.
    Anyhow, god bless all you older, experienced, bitter nurses in the world and know that many people have been grateful for your service and kept alive because of it!!!
  24. Like
    mtnNurse., BSN reacted to Persephone Paige, ADN in I Hope This is Not the Latest Trend   
    As long as medicine keeps extending lives ( keeping hearts pumping while brains and bodies wear out ), people keep wanting to live forever, kids want some place to stuff mom, dad or whomever and people need jobs, this is going to keep happening. And someone will get an award somewhere... 
    Meanwhile, Nurse Nancy gets sent to the big house for killing 94 year old Pops and her kid gets sent to foster care.
    Nice...
  25. Like
    mtnNurse., BSN got a reaction from morelostthanfound, BSN in I Hope This is Not the Latest Trend   
    THANK YOU for your honest post showing compassion for fellow nurses who work in horrible conditions!!!
    If you are a nurse who has been blessed enough to never have had to work in such conditions, or never have experienced the desperation of needing a job to survive, find it in yourself to imagine what that would be like, find your compassion for these people, and ask yourself if the world is better that they are criminalized. Please.
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