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Gary Mendoza

Gary Mendoza

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Reputation Activity by Gary Mendoza

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Like 8

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Like 5

  1. Like
    Gary Mendoza got a reaction from baschaff, RN in Expect hardest assignment, no CNAs, no lunch break?   
    mtnNurse, IV skills are always nice to have, but most places I've worked the Med/Surg nurses weren't very good with IV's nor were they expected to be. Most of them would call ICU or ER for hard sticks unless they had an IV team. I wouldn't fret if your IV skills aren't up to snuff. I've been traveling for many years and it's hit or miss with the CNAs / Techs. Some assignments you have no techs at all, some assignments you have one tech for the entire floor and a few assignments I had plenty of techs. That's always a good question to ask in your interview with the facility, but sometimes they aren't going to be honest with their answer so try to 'read between the lines'.
    baschaff , I have to say that most places I've worked at were fair with patient assignments, but there have been a few where the travelers got the worse of the worst and those were usually the smaller rural hospitals. I think the reason is two-fold. 1. rural nurses and doctors aren't as experienced as a seasoned travel nurse (usually) so they give the "scary" patients to the travelers 2. small rural hospitals are very 'clicky' and they rather shit on you than their neighbor, you're leaving eventually so if they piss you off, no big deal really.
    Overall, travel is very challenging, you have to be able to take some abuse (a lot in some rare cases) , but you also have to be able to put your foot down and say "NO" when things are dangerous and/or jeopardize your license. Only you know what you can handle and if it's getting to be too much you have to be comfortable speaking up because they don't know your limits.
     
  2. Like
    Gary Mendoza got a reaction from Swellz in Traveling for a PNR...   
    I've never seen a traveler that worked PRN, but if they did I would imagine you would be at a huge disadvantage because you wouldn't have guaranteed hours being PRN. They would have to fill the schedule with staff first, next with full-time travelers (with guaranteed hours) and then you. They could work you as little as they wanted and I don't imagine you'd get full-time hours. If I were going to travel , I wouldn't even consider PRN positions. However, if you were just going to be local per-diem with a local agency you could probably work multiple hospitals and get enough shifts.
  3. Like
    Gary Mendoza reacted to NedRN in Too soon to travel?   
    Good plan. Absolutely project a confident attitude, but don't oversell it. Managers have lots of experience with confident newer nurses, and that group (typecasting here so don't take it personally) can be scary on the job. It is much more reassuring to a manager if you tell them you will seek help when needed.
  4. Like
    Gary Mendoza reacted to NedRN in Looking for resource on which travel nurse agencies are owned by the same company.   
    American Mobile brands are:
    American Mobile Healthcare
    Medical Express
    NursesRx
    Preferred Healthcare Staffing (brand disused as of Feb 2009)
    Platinum Select
    HRMC
    O'Grady-Peyton International (international)
    Staff Care (physician)
    Merritt Hawkins & Associates (physician)
    Nurse Choice
    RN Demand (brand disused as of Feb 2009)
    RN Extend
    Med Travelers (allied)
    Rx Pro Health (pharmacy)
    Thera Tech Staffing (allied)
    Medfinders (vendor management) acquired 2010
    SingleSource (vendor management) acquired 2010
    Nursefinders (vendor management, travel, local staffing) acquired 2010
    Nursefinders Homecare acquired 2010
    National Healthcare Staffing (travel) acquired 2010
    Linde Healthcare/Kendall & Davis (physicians) acquired 2010
    Resources On Call (allied health) acquired 2010
    Club Staffing (allied health) acquired 2010
    HealthSourceGlobal (strike and rapid response)
    In addition: NurseZone This is a comprehensive nursing site, but does stealth marketing for AMN. And TravelNursing gives the impression of an independent job board. 
  5. Like
    Gary Mendoza reacted to NedRN in Looking for resource on which travel nurse agencies are owned by the same company.   
    Cross Country's brands are: 
    Akos (research staffing)
    Assent (research staffing)
    Assignment America (international)
    ClinForce (research staffing)
    Cross Country Local (per diem)
    Cross Country TravCorps
    Cross Country Staffing (travel)
    CRU48 (rapid response assignments) 
    Healthstaffers (government/military assignments)
    MedStaff (travel and per diem)
    MDA - Medical Doctor Associates (physician and allied health)
    MRA Search (nurses and other Healthcare Professionals)
    MRA - Metropolitan Research (research staffing)
    NovaPro (travel)
    In addition, they operate Cross Country University and Cross Country Education as separate subsidiaries and Cejka Search which is a mostly physician permanent placement agency. RNTravelSpace gives the appearance of an independent travel nurse resource page but is actually a recruiting page for CCTV's brands only.
  6. Like
    Gary Mendoza reacted to NedRN in Taking travel job, hoping for perm offer. Too risky?   
    Sure, but you do better applying for perm, especially if staff is as scarce as you say. Sign on bonus, relocation is much more likely to be better if you don't start as a traveler. In part because the agency employing the traveler "owns" them - the hospital has to pay them a rather large fee to release the traveler. Better that money goes to you, right?
  7. Like
    Gary Mendoza reacted to ChrisMMS in Travel Nursing <6 Months!   
    Hi! Recruiter here and my answers to your questions have been posted below, I hope they are of some help to you.
    1) My tips to you when choosing a company is decide what you are needing from a travel agency and go based off that. For instance bigger companies like Aya, AMN, etc. will tend to have better benefits, more contracts, and faster placement. However, you will tend to make less money because these companies are taking a much larger margin of your contract compared to small/mid sized companies. Also factor that often times recruiters at agencies like this have anywhere between 40-100 nurses at any given time which means you may not always have the same relationship you would with a smaller company. On the flip side a smaller company will tend to pay more, but have less benefits and possibly less jobs. Decide what's most important to you and start your research from there. If you go to Gypsy Nurse you can get a pretty good idea of the general temperature of certain companies and i believe there is a nurse only group that rates each company on different criteria.
    2) We generally recommend that you start working 6 weeks before your desired start date so you are given adequate time to find a contract and complete the credentialing process. You can have your paperwork done far in advance, but jobs are only posted so far in the future.
    3) It is in your best interest to work with multiple companies because some of the reasons previously stated in the last question. You never know what you need at what time, being able to have multiple offers from different companies helps make sure that you are always well taken care of. It is also important to note that working with multiple companies adds a sense of stability which allows you t work year round. To your second part of this question refer to the answer above.
    4) Not a nurse, but I've listed challenges that my nurses experienced or have been discussed in travel groups.
    -Housing (finding adequate and safe housing can be difficult at times).
    -Pay Packages (Understanding pay packages and the breakdown can be confusing when companies do them so differently, it's very important to understand this part to make sure you are being paid properly and legally).
    -Being away from home (Traveling away from your family and friends can be difficult at times and many nurses go through that burnout. There are dedicated travel nursing groups for meeting other travelers at your current travel assignment).
    -Adjusting to the facility (Not all facilities are going to treat travelers the same some will love having you there and integrate you into the fold very quickly. Others will see you as an outsider and give you the unwanted/difficult assignments. It is something that travelers will have to get use too as it is part of the industry).
    5) I would 100% recommend that you do because once you start signing up or working with certain websites or agencies you will get bombarded with emails. Not to mention that your information can/will be sold to travel agencies based on which websites you use and you can receive dozens of calls/text/emails in a single day.
    Best of luck to you on your travel journey! If you have any further questions please let me know.
  8. Like
    Gary Mendoza reacted to baschaff, RN in Expect hardest assignment, no CNAs, no lunch break?   
    Gary thank you for the honest assessment...that's about what I figured. I'm in Louisiana so I'm thinking that the work environment can't possibly be too much worse than here...🙄
  9. Like
    Gary Mendoza reacted to NedRN in Expect hardest assignment, no CNAs, no lunch break?   
    You might even find that travel assignments will be easier/better than your current staff job in many ways. Stay away from the South and HSA and Tenet hospitals (for-profit) hospitals for best results. California has the nation's only mandated staffing law, but many union hospitals in say the NE have similar rules (typically not as strictly followed as California's though as it is a contractual rule verses a legal rule with the force of law). Lots of travelers love California and they use a lot of travelers. If you are interested in travel assignments there at any point in the future, apply now for licensure, it can take a while.
  10. Like
    Gary Mendoza got a reaction from baschaff, RN in Expect hardest assignment, no CNAs, no lunch break?   
    mtnNurse, IV skills are always nice to have, but most places I've worked the Med/Surg nurses weren't very good with IV's nor were they expected to be. Most of them would call ICU or ER for hard sticks unless they had an IV team. I wouldn't fret if your IV skills aren't up to snuff. I've been traveling for many years and it's hit or miss with the CNAs / Techs. Some assignments you have no techs at all, some assignments you have one tech for the entire floor and a few assignments I had plenty of techs. That's always a good question to ask in your interview with the facility, but sometimes they aren't going to be honest with their answer so try to 'read between the lines'.
    baschaff , I have to say that most places I've worked at were fair with patient assignments, but there have been a few where the travelers got the worse of the worst and those were usually the smaller rural hospitals. I think the reason is two-fold. 1. rural nurses and doctors aren't as experienced as a seasoned travel nurse (usually) so they give the "scary" patients to the travelers 2. small rural hospitals are very 'clicky' and they rather shit on you than their neighbor, you're leaving eventually so if they piss you off, no big deal really.
    Overall, travel is very challenging, you have to be able to take some abuse (a lot in some rare cases) , but you also have to be able to put your foot down and say "NO" when things are dangerous and/or jeopardize your license. Only you know what you can handle and if it's getting to be too much you have to be comfortable speaking up because they don't know your limits.
     
  11. Like
    Gary Mendoza got a reaction from baschaff, RN in Expect hardest assignment, no CNAs, no lunch break?   
    mtnNurse, IV skills are always nice to have, but most places I've worked the Med/Surg nurses weren't very good with IV's nor were they expected to be. Most of them would call ICU or ER for hard sticks unless they had an IV team. I wouldn't fret if your IV skills aren't up to snuff. I've been traveling for many years and it's hit or miss with the CNAs / Techs. Some assignments you have no techs at all, some assignments you have one tech for the entire floor and a few assignments I had plenty of techs. That's always a good question to ask in your interview with the facility, but sometimes they aren't going to be honest with their answer so try to 'read between the lines'.
    baschaff , I have to say that most places I've worked at were fair with patient assignments, but there have been a few where the travelers got the worse of the worst and those were usually the smaller rural hospitals. I think the reason is two-fold. 1. rural nurses and doctors aren't as experienced as a seasoned travel nurse (usually) so they give the "scary" patients to the travelers 2. small rural hospitals are very 'clicky' and they rather shit on you than their neighbor, you're leaving eventually so if they piss you off, no big deal really.
    Overall, travel is very challenging, you have to be able to take some abuse (a lot in some rare cases) , but you also have to be able to put your foot down and say "NO" when things are dangerous and/or jeopardize your license. Only you know what you can handle and if it's getting to be too much you have to be comfortable speaking up because they don't know your limits.
     
  12. Like
    Gary Mendoza got a reaction from baschaff, RN in Expect hardest assignment, no CNAs, no lunch break?   
    mtnNurse, IV skills are always nice to have, but most places I've worked the Med/Surg nurses weren't very good with IV's nor were they expected to be. Most of them would call ICU or ER for hard sticks unless they had an IV team. I wouldn't fret if your IV skills aren't up to snuff. I've been traveling for many years and it's hit or miss with the CNAs / Techs. Some assignments you have no techs at all, some assignments you have one tech for the entire floor and a few assignments I had plenty of techs. That's always a good question to ask in your interview with the facility, but sometimes they aren't going to be honest with their answer so try to 'read between the lines'.
    baschaff , I have to say that most places I've worked at were fair with patient assignments, but there have been a few where the travelers got the worse of the worst and those were usually the smaller rural hospitals. I think the reason is two-fold. 1. rural nurses and doctors aren't as experienced as a seasoned travel nurse (usually) so they give the "scary" patients to the travelers 2. small rural hospitals are very 'clicky' and they rather shit on you than their neighbor, you're leaving eventually so if they piss you off, no big deal really.
    Overall, travel is very challenging, you have to be able to take some abuse (a lot in some rare cases) , but you also have to be able to put your foot down and say "NO" when things are dangerous and/or jeopardize your license. Only you know what you can handle and if it's getting to be too much you have to be comfortable speaking up because they don't know your limits.
     
  13. Like
    Gary Mendoza reacted to NedRN in Too soon to travel?   
    You might be confident, but why would a manager pick you over someone with more proven experience, especially as a traveler? Not competitive with the field. If you are willing to start travel on crappy low paying jobs, then sure, it will work. Keep your staff job until you have been confirmed, and have a Plan B (sign up with several agencies) if that falls through after you have resigned. If possible, take a leave of absence or see if you can shift to limited PRN requirement.
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