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nursex23

nursex23 BSN, RN

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nursex23 has 2 years experience as a BSN, RN.

nursex23's Latest Activity

  1. nursex23

    How? Just, HOW?!

    I wouldn't mind as long as I'm not the one they're going to look at if it becomes infected. All you can do is educate and document.
  2. nursex23

    "do not rehire" list?

    Long story short I worked for a nursing home as as CNA when I was in college. I gave the ADON my availability which consisted of 6 different shifts throughout the week. I was part time so I had to work 3 shifts a week. I even indicated on my availability that I am open these 6 so pick any 3. The ADON scheduled me for all 6 shifts every week for the next few months. I even clarified with her that this is not what I meant but she said it's already in so I had to find coverage. This was 6 years ago and I now know how I should have handled it but instead I got coverage when I could, called off when I couldn't work and I found a new job. I could not get a hold of my DON so I told her over voicemail and then put my 2 weeks letter on her desk. Again, I know what I should have done differently. Anyway, that nursing home has since been bought by a larger system. I've applied to about 5 jobs since with no call back. I want to believe that it's because they are highly sought after roles and I meet the minimum qualifications but each time I applied, I had to indicate that I had previously worked for the health system that was bought out. I'm worried that I was put on a "do not rehire" list or that the new system sees that I would call in a lot or even worse, made it look like I was fired. Is there any way I would be able to know for sure?
  3. nursex23

    I hate to tell you I told you so........

    If another student comes in because their teacher said to "just get an ice pack" I'm going to freak out.
  4. nursex23

    Vent Sesh

    FF comes in this AM because he "fell" and "hurt" his wrist. Nothing wrong with it but he swears he can't flex it. Ok, ice it. He then comes in about an hour later asking me to take his temp because his stomach hurts. No fever, he then proceeds to tell me it's because the juices here give him a stomach ache and he drank 7. Welp there you go. He comes back about half an hour later asking for pepto because he feels like he's going to throw up. I told him to see if throwing up makes it feel better. He then asks me to call for someone to pick him up. No, we are not going to call. I just found out that he went home. I guess he called or texted for someone to come get him because he threw up. Why do parents feed into their kids nonsense and keep them home for any little ailment? Btw this is a 7th grader with poor attendance and grades and is always in the nurses office with make believe ailments.
  5. nursex23

    Vent Sesh

    Frustrating! Especially when they look shocked that there's nothing you can do for them. Maybe refer them to the social worker?
  6. nursex23

    nurse reviewer vs. school nurse

    Hi Amaezingrace, I did not go with the insurance job. I decided not to even apply. I haven't decided definitively how I'm liking the school job so I'm going to stick with it for now. Good luck!
  7. nursex23

    Parent with Borderline Personality Disorder

    Woah! Something similar to this happened last year when a student was at an elementary school in my district. Mom fought to get a 504 that the nurse felt was unnecessary but mom won because she kept going up the chain of command. I talked to that nurse and she's explained it exactly how you’re describing. Fast forward a year later, he's at my middle school and I'm the first one to realize that his condition hasn’t been followed by a doctor for almost 10 months. I've asked mom about this and she stopped communicating with me. The dean and social worker are involved and she's refusing to give us any updated medical documentation. She's also said she refuses to attend the 504 meeting we scheduled next week. Meanwhile, this poor kid has only been here 2 days since winter break. It's really sad that the kids are the ones who suffer. I’m a brand new school nurse and I don’t know what else I could do.
  8. That makes sense. I ran with the first line that said she got a text but it would make sense that the manager texted requesting a phone call. In that case OP I would see what the manager wants to discuss and make sure you are somewhere private when you're on the phone.
  9. Legally speaking, I would imagine this would be a huge hippa violation. I'll admit I've discussed a patient with my manager via text. She was asking about an incident and I did feel comfortable discussing it via text because I trusted her. But you're right, that would potentially open you up to trouble if she reported those messages. Maybe you would feel more comfortable via phone? Or just telling her you don't feel comfortable discussing it outside of work and you will talk to her the next day you see her. You would definitely be in the right to not discuss anything outside of work. Are you sure? Wouldn't that leave text messages on a nurse's phone about patient information? What if the phone got stolen or a spouse or a friend were looking through the phone for some reason?
  10. nursex23

    Really not appreciating the attitude today

    That sounds like a dream come true. We have 900 MS students and there's a lot of behavior issues here. The old nurse used to let anybody come and just hang out here. NOPE! Not me. I'm prioritizing my asthmatics, diabetics, ill, or injured students. The kids can hang out with the dean if they're so adamant about being out of class. I used to ALWAYS get students about to be late coming in with invisible ailments so they could get a pass. Nope to that too!
  11. nursex23

    Really not appreciating the attitude today

    For some reason, girls looking for pads always come in with a pass with too much information. The one thing that I never require a pass for..
  12. nursex23

    Really not appreciating the attitude today

    I've thought about that. My only problem with passes is that many students don't want to go to class and come to my office. Some especially come before gym and try to stay in my office to get out of PE.
  13. nursex23

    Really not appreciating the attitude today

    Oh I forgot to mention. A student was brought in this morning by a teacher for a small finger injury. Nothing major at all, small bruise that hurts when he touches it, no swelling, student can move it with no pain. Teacher says "it's swollen can we get some ice." Teacher left. Again not swollen but definitely might start to swell so I put ice. Then I told the student he can go back to class but just leave the ice on there and come back if it swells or if it starts hurting or you can't move it, yada yada. But then he said "oh the teacher said if you can tape it to this finger." What?? Why did they even hire a nurse if clearly all of their teachers are medical professionals.
  14. Too many kids were coming in without passes so I started enforcing this policy more after winter break as the principal said I should when I first started. Yesterday a student came without a pass and gave me his shirt tag and said his gym teacher told him to give me this as a pass. *eye roll* Today another student came in with no pass from gym for an ice pack for an invisible injury. When I told her she needed a pass she gave me a really hard time saying but she said to come here. I really don't know who is worse the students or the teachers who cannot be bothered to give them a piece of paper stating that they should be in the nurses office so that I know that the student is where they are supposed to be.
  15. nursex23

    Nurse vs respiratory

    I used to work at an LTACH and it was a big no no for nurses to do this. Technically, any breathing meds, even albuterol, fell on the RT and more often than not, they would document towards the end of the shift. Look up your policy and in the future, collaborate more with RT. I would have done my assessment on the patient and called the RT. If the assessment warranted more urgent treatment, I would call for any RT. At my facility, we would almost never call a respiratory related rapid response without consulting RT first because there is actually so much that they can do for the patients. I know everything has left a bad taste in your mouth but I would actually go back to that RT and apologize. Let them know that your only interest was on the patient and that you have learned that you can't do it all and that you will collaborate more with RT in the future.
  16. nursex23

    Tips for dealing with techs/pct’s as a new grad

    While I respect all of the work that aides do (I was a CNA once), you have to remember that your education and license is above theirs, therefore, they cannot look at what you're doing and make the determination that you need to be doing something else. Everything that they do is within our scope of practice so you have to look at it as though we can do everything they do plus a lot more that they can't. They are there to take the work that can be done under a certificate so that we, the RNs, can do the nursing stuff that they cannot. If you have a minute, yeah absolutely help out your aides and ultimately your patients, but if you do not have a minute, you cannot let them bully you into questioning your priorities. Ignore their comments but also stand firm that you are the RN. Remember, you went to school to learn how to prioritize nursing care. Between taking someone off the commode and prepping to transport a patient to OR, you as the RN can clearly see which one is the priority. Next time feel free to tell your aide yourself that their priority is not yours right now. Of COURSE be respectful about it; the better respect you and your aides have for each other, the better your lives at work will be. tldr; ignore their comments, help out when you can because it will be better for everyone, but don't let them bully you into forgoing your priorities as an RN.
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