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CFnDogs

CFnDogs

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  1. CFnDogs

    Already failed three exams in one class! Help!

    The dreaded SATA. Look at them as true/false. Ignore the other answers, and take them ONE AT A TIME!
  2. CFnDogs

    Nursing Student and Working Fulltime

    Honestly, I only see this being possible in maybe some ADN programs. It would be physically impossible in my ABSN program. There are quite literally not enough hours in the day. Anyway, I would recommend continuing to see how it works for you, OP. I WISH I could work, but my classes are 10 hours twice a week and clinicals are 3 times per week 6:30am-5:30pm. Weekends are for studying, because it's pretty hard doing it after clinical and class when my commute is an hour +. Godspeed!
  3. CFnDogs

    VERY First Clinical

    I remember my first clinical, I too had a positive experience. Remember that not EVERY day will live up to your "expectations". Some days you will feel like a rockstar, others might leave you feeling a little (or a lot!) clueless. Be open to the experience. Be humble and willing to help EVERYONE on the floor. The more you make yourself open to the opportunities, the more opportunities you get, and the better your experience will be. Sometimes you get a crappy day (I got put with an RN once who HID from any student she got!), but I firmly believe clinical is as good as you make it. Many people get themselves SO worked up, nervous, and disappointed. Roll with the punches. TIP: Be nice to the CNA's. Help them when you can, tell them you are available to help. You will learn a lot about basic patient care from them.
  4. CFnDogs

    I'm having doubts about nursing... :(

    I spent my first 3 clinicals with a CNA. I found the experience to be extremely valuable. CNA skills are also nursing responsibilities. It is extremely important that students learn these skills and are ready to perform them when they become RN's. Not all floors have CNA's all the time. CNA's don't always have time. I think it is very important to work "in their shoes" before becoming an RN. When you are good to the CNA's/empathize, they will remember you and be more willing to help you. I have formed a really great relationship with 2-3 CNA's on my floor, even though I am exclusively now with RN's. When they have an interesting patient, they grab me to help. If they need help, I make myself available to them. I see every opportunity as an opportunity to learn. Some of the aides have shared some amazing techniques with me over the past semester, and will make me a better nurse for it. They show a LOT of compassion, and are often the ones left "holding the hand" of the sick patients. I didn't learn a lot of basic needs in my fundies class, and I am SO thankful for the kickbutt aides that I have worked with that have shown me the way. I know a lot of people are upset they have to work with CNA's, I really don't understand why. Their duties are YOUR duties. Your patient is still your patient. You will have the rest of your nursing education and career to develop skills. The best nurses I work with take it upon themselves to make their pt's comfortable whether or not the aide is available. Remember: CNA work IS nurse work. You need to build from the basics. I think every program should start students with a CNA, tbh.
  5. CFnDogs

    Expensive stethoscope for student?

    I have a master cardiology and nobody had "judged" me for it. I had no idea what it "was", my father bought it for me as a gift BEFORE I started my program. My husband has the same stethoscope (he's been a PA for several years, and when HE got it, he actually had it sent to him on accident and the company let him keep it, and of course he had no regrets!), and loves it, so my dad got it for me. I have personally been able to pick up on "odd" noises much more quickly than my classmates, but that could just be luck. I haven't had anyone treat me any differently because of it (that I can notice anyways). I usually have it in my pocket anyways. It's engraved with my (very unique, thanks dad!) last name, which I highly recommend. Judging someone by their stetho seems just as ridiculous to me as judging someone by something like their wedding jewelry, or $140 danskos vs. $20 walmart clogs. Would I notice? Yes. Would I care? no.
  6. CFnDogs

    Tips on makeup during clinicals?

    What an extremely offensive/unprofessional request. Was the instructor joking? We were advised to keep a "neat" appearance: shoes clean, scrubs not wrinkled, hair clean and tied out of our faces, tattoos covered, no jewelry except for wedding rings (if you really must), nails short and clean, no fragrance. Rules were applied equally to males and females, and no mention of makeup. I USED to use Makeup Forever "Aqua Brow" back in the day. It's a liquid, waterproof eyebrow gel that is amazing when you have the time/patience. It hardly EVER moved. I wonder if the person who told you that you might "scare" the patients has ever even worked with patients. Unless you're unhygienic, a patient isn't going to care about your makeup routine. Personally, I find that I need to "check" my makeup throughout the day, and it would just distract me in the hospital. I keep it simple.
  7. I have the Saunders book, and as a first semester ABSN student, I have to say it's a great tool! It wasn't super relevant until about halfway through this semester, but I use it as a supplement to my instructors ppt's. It's condensed into what you need to know, and the practice questions in the back of the sections have really prepared me for those NCLEX style questions. Even if you don't fully understand all of the information in the chapters yet (chances are you won't), it's still extremely helpful. I find my Saunders book especially helpful in subjects where my professor just doesn't teach/blasts through the ppt and tells us to "read the book", or when the teacher isn't the best at creating ppt's.
  8. In my program, an A is a 94-100, A- is 91-93. A 78 is failing.
  9. I don't personally have kids, but many of my cohort do. Several of them have mentioned a weekly cleaning service (or bi weekly even) to get the "bulk" of the cleaning done, and the rest is manageable for them and their spouse to do on weekends/during the week. Kudos to you. I only have a husband and two dogs and I struggled to find time. Luckily, my husband loves to cook and meal prep so I hardly ever have to worry about food to bring to school. Good luck!
  10. I wouldn't recommend studying too far ahead/reading too much into it, you won't have the context and you might end up spinning your wheels. Enjoy your time off. Take care of your health (get your eyes checked, teeth cleaned, anything else you need to do). Learn how to pre-cook healthy meals and get into a good exercise routine. It'll be here soon enough.
  11. CFnDogs

    How many hours would you work taking 14 credits?

    It's really going to depend on you. When I was in my first degree taking similar courses, I tended to work 30-50 hours a week between my paid work and unpaid internships.
  12. CFnDogs

    Should I take A&P to prepare for TEAS test?

    This is going to vary by person. The best way to "test" yourself is to purchase a TEAS practice test and see how you do. Take the test as you would exactly (you can look up the TEAS testing procedure online) with the same amount of time, breaks etc. If you do well on the practice test, chances are you can do well on the TEAS. I personally had just taken my pre reqs the year before, so I did quite well. I believe I scored a 90 or so on the actual TEAS, and in the 80's on my practice tests. I took a month to "review" but only because I had the time to burn. For me, my human bio class was actually better at preparing me than A&P. I had an awful A&P experience. Good luck. I would take the practice tests and see how you do before you retake a class. I would really hesitate to do that. If you have a good baseline, you shouldn't need to, unless it's been many years.
  13. It depends on the class/subject matter. I wasn't expecting this, but I actually find it useful to read my Pharmacology chapters. I'm not sure if it's because I enjoy pharm, or because the book is good, but I find that reading the chapters through at least once was pretty helpful. So, for that, I do make the time to read the book and compare with my teachers notes. My pharm book is to the point, so the chapters are short and informative. I find a lot of textbooks have a LOT of extra fluff. Patho? Hopeless. We have also covered 30 chapters and I am only 1.5 months in to my first semester. I'm in an ABSN, if that makes any difference. Maybe it's the book, but I don't have time to read it word for word. I DO, however, go back and re read any concepts that I am very unclear on. My prof is a godsend in that he gives us wonderful notes. We have to complete weekly discussion boards that require us to read through important topics in the book, so I DO have to do it then. Fundies? Sometimes. The book is enormous and often has a lot of fluff. Again, this is one where I go back and re read if I am having issues. A lot of times our prof for this doesn't teach on a topic that will be on the test, so it doesn't leave me a choice. It depends. You might find that you will have different ways of studying for different classes and different subject matter within the same class. In pharm, I have used a different method for quite literally every module. I guess my preferences just change! Edit: If I were to read ALL readings every single week, it would be over 10 chapters of DENSE material. I think I tried this my first week, but I found that it just took too much time. FWIW, I am a speed reader and if anyone could find time, it would have been me. Do I want to? Yes. It just can't be my priority because my priority is completing assignments on time. Thankfully, my professors are pretty realistic, but one or two of them isn't and that's kind of a bummer, but I learn who those profs are early on and how to do well in their classes.
  14. Oof, doesn't seem like there is really a "right" or "wrong" answer here. How long ago did you graduate, and how much time have you spent teaching? Do you believe that your debt load is contributing to your disenchantment with your career choice? Is teaching (not sure if this is a dumb question, I'm not the right person to ask) the only thing that you are eligible to do with your various degrees? Have you seen a career counselor (perhaps at your university that you graduated from) to explore options? Surely you aren't the only graduate that has felt this way. There could be possibilities out there that you just aren't aware of. I don't think you sound "directionless", I think you sound like you love helping people, but you just don't know HOW you want that to look like. I'm not saying nursing ISN'T for you, but I'm thinking you should take a step back and see what's in your toolbox and what you have to offer the world before you put yourself through more debt and a few more years of education. Depending on how much debt you have, I would recommend getting that debt load down/saving up before you jump into a program. I am going to say right now that you are NOT old to enter nursing. I'm 28 and just beginning my program. Many in my cohort are younger, but most are my age and older, up into mid 40's. You aren't late to the game. We will be here! Career change students bring a LOT of experience with them that can be helpful in their education. Don't worry about that. FWIW, a lot of nurses I shadow on the floor share their experience of their education with me, and many of them went back to school as a second career/went for the first time after children grew, etc.
  15. CFnDogs

    Path as a prereq/no pharm

    You're right, most of us feel that way! I have never heard of patho as a prerequisite. Are you in the US? I have seen some schools allow some students take patho early if they have the grades and are already admitted, but never as a pre req! Is there any sort of additional patho being offered at the beginning of the program? I have also never heard of pharm being included with patho. Pharm is one of my classes this semester, and I have also NEVER seen this as prerequisite. We do sometimes talk about drugs in patho, but I would never say that it is it's own class. Is this an ASN or BSN program? I've never heard of this before. In terms of feeling prepared, none of us do. You're going to school to LEARN. Believe me, I feel lost every time my patho professor says "This is just A&P or high school science review..." and then I glaze over! I wouldn't worry about it too much. If you did well, you likely retained more than you think. Patho is just to give you a baseline of knowledge so that you can see things down the road, and go "hey! I've heard that word!", or "Hey, I kind of remember that, but not really. Let me go over it again". Trust the process. I have to admit that I was a bit short changed with some online pre reqs, but so far I am very successful in my classes and scoring well on all my exams. Don't worry, you'll be taught what you need to know.
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