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Profanity in the workplace

Nurses   (5,171 Views 60 Comments)
by Emergent Emergent (Member)

Emergent has 25 years experience and works as a Emergency Room RN.

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You are reading page 5 of Profanity in the workplace. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

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I got tired of hearing people say, 'I can't help it'... yes you can, you just rationalize it and give yourself permission to use it... it is a bad habit, no more...

I agree and there are times when I feel my foul language is getting excessive but as you point out I usually decide I'm fine with it and carry on status quo. I probably won't change my ways but it does give me pause when I realize there are those who are truly offended by it because that is never my intent.

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I work in a subacute rehab unit at a LTC and apparently our crew is known for our potty mouths.. were one of the busiest units in the building..

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NightOwl0624 has 6 years experience.

9,620 Visitors; 536 Posts

I worked in two hospitals within the same system. in the large, inner city hospital, I hardly ever heard profanity by the staff. But at the small, very upscale hospital the f bombs fly constantly by the staff. I don't care if they are behind closed doors, but lots of staff curse in patient areas, constantly. I can't believe there aren't complaints and that management doesn't care (surely they notice??)

While cursing can have its place in certain situations, and I am guilty of that as well, i think the constant swearing is unprofessional. I don't really care to hear it. If I was a patient and heard it, I would complain. I guess it's good that most patients are confused and hard of hearing, lol.

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martymoose works as a rn.

4 Likes; 20,736 Visitors; 1,849 Posts

I am not offended if I hear f -bombs, but I was actually quite surprised to hear as many f bombs as I did from my patient assignment corner.mind you, the minimum age of the offenders (pleural) was 80 + years old. And they were using it in the correct context also!we joked (amongst ourselves)that they were "sentence enhancers" as SpongeBob SquarePants would say ,lol

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NICUismylife is a ADN, BSN, RN and works as a NICU RN.

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There is a reason I work night shift! Potty mouth RN, reporting for duty!

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Depends on the environment! I am in the County Jail. Too much professional language is not always appreciated in the trenches. If you dont joke and you dont swear, you might be a robot or a snitch. We know the patient is being over the top behaviorally challenging when a medical provider starts cursing after rounds...thats like Christmas! Its hilarious! LOL.

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Tenebrae has 6 years experience and works as a Registered Nurse in Gerontology.

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F U ;)

Follow up?:cheeky:

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Floor I'm on is very toxic and negative. Cursing helps cope and let's out stress. Lol. Of course not in front of certain populations.

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BookishBelle works as a Nursing student; piano teacher.

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This post made me laugh since we had just been discussing this issue in my clinical. One of the students came back from her ER rotation asking the instructor if ER was known for their potty mouths. Up on the oncology floor we hadn't really encountered that. I didn't notice it on the PCU where I did a rotation either. Our instructor is very strict about it, since she says it doesn't say "professional" to be using curse words. I can see how a fast paced atmosphere may lend itself to expressions of concern though.

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I tend to see coworkers who swear constantly as those who are loose cannons/don't have good control over their emotions. I dread having to tell them something I know will set them off. That, or I really don't trust their judgment that something is truly urgent... because they swear like everything is the end of the world.

That said, I do appreciate it as a release... I just do it out of earshot.

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hppygr8ful has 15 years experience and works as a RN - Adolescent Psych.

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My wise and wonderful Irish Grandmother would say there's never an excuse for profanity! Because I work with adolescents we enforce a strict no cursing rule which includes staff. Our patients earn points for positive behavior so if they catch us cursing we have to give them points. It keeps all of us on our toes.

I generally don't curse except when I am alone in my car - but the closer I get to needing a vacation the more likely it is that a curse word will slip out.

Hppy

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Davey Do has 35 years experience and works as a Behavioral Health RN.

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I admire people who use euphemisms when they could easily resort to the use of profanity:

it just scares the code brown out of me .

Here's to you, Daisy!

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