Which path would you take to BSN?

  1. I already have a BS (and MS, shhh, lots of $$'s shelled out and now a career change!) and want to be a nurse. I just completed a CNA course and I KNOW now that this is the right decision.

    Now, how to get there!

    1) ADN at local community college, then bridge program to BSN. The ADN will take 2 years, can probably continue my part-time job, probably "softer" to my kids who would be 6 & 8 when I start and DH) The bridge should take a year.
    2) Accelerated BSN at state university (18 months straight, full time, more of a juggle for my kids and DH, but half the time)

    I am 35, will be 38 before I start the clinicals, and primarily a SAHM, I work part-time. We are willing to live on loans if I have to do school full-time. We currently are student loan free, but I have used up most of my federal allotment, would probably have to do private loans.

    Kids would be in school full-time when I start. Will begin to take the science pre-reqs a few at a time sooner.

    Sorry to ramble!
  2. Visit LovesDisney profile page

    About LovesDisney

    Joined: Sep '06; Posts: 12

    35 Comments

  3. by   fleur-de-lis
    I am currently in semester 2 of a 4 semester accelerated program. I have no kids yet, just a hubby and lots of critters, and I am fortunate enough not to have to work during the program. That said, if I could go back and do it all over, I would not be in the accelerated program. It is fantastic that in 15 total months you can be a nurse, but the program is so demanding. Many of my classmates have kids, and most say that either their family or their grades suffer. There is just not enough hours in the day to do both! Even for me, with no kids and a supportive husband, this program is kicking my butt! I have all A's so far, but at what price? I have had a knee injury, been sick several times, and the migraines I have not had for a couple of years have returned with avengence. Not to be down on accelerated programs, they are great, but you have to be willing to literally put your life on hold for the length of the program. Like I said, if I could go back and do it again, I would get an associates at the local community college then to a bridge program for RN-MSN. Good luck to you!!!!
  4. by   puresass
    why would you want to do a bridge program from an ADN to a BSN if you already have an BS? i have no idea how it works if you have a BS in another field & want your BSN to get into management, but if you're thinking about grad school later on down the line & THATs why you want your BSN, most grad schools will allow nurses with BSNs AND nurses with their ADN & a BA/BS in another field to apply.

    i don't have any experience with the accelerated programs, but i'd imagine it would be difficult to cram all of that knowledge into a 18 mos... but a lot of people absolutely LOVE accelerated programs.
  5. by   mvanz9999
    I'm in the midst of this mess myself. I have narrowed it down to either ADN or Masters (for non-nursing majors). I'd like to get my Masters, and obviously going directly there is the fastest solution, but I've got the problem of the Master's pre-reqs that will end up taking forever.

    What I'M going to do is apply to the ADN AND the Master's Programs, see who offers me what money, who can take me when (if I get wait-listed for 2-3 years on the ADN program, I'm probaby not going to wait).

    I guess I would say to apply to both programs, unless you know you won't be wait-listed for several years, and then decide after you get the offers.
  6. by   np_wannabe
    Hi LovesDisney. You must be my twin. I am also a SAHM with a BS and MS, but am STILL paying back my student loans. Until I came across an accelerated BSN thread here yesterday (I think in the Florida Nurses forum), I was planning to do accelerated. Now, I'm not so sure either. The thread I read was someone going to Barry University's Accelerated BSN. She dropped out half-way through and said the program started with 60 students and finished with 16. Scary, I know.

    My kids are only 3 and 1, would be 2 and 4 when I start. They're at home with me now full time, so it would be a HUGE transition.

    I posted a thread asking people about their accelerated BSN experiences somewhere--maybe the Florida Nursing forum. I don't think anyone has replied though.

    Good luck.
    Carla
  7. by   BSNtobe2009
    I have seen alot post what fleur has posted...accelerated programs sound like a good idea, but they suck the life out of you.

    I, personally, also have a BS...I'm doing a ASN and then I found a hospital that will pay my tuition for RN to BSN....so the entire degree will only cost me about $6K which will allow me to graduate with ZERO debt.

    The RN to BSN is a part-time weekend program...how cool is that?
  8. by   LovesDisney
    Okay, here is what I am thinking.

    If I do the accelerated, I would not work. If I do the ASN, I would work part-time. So, I think it would be the same level of crazy?! And, my train of thought is that 18 months of crazy is better than 3 years of crazy?

    The program I am looking at is Monday-Thursday 8-4. Now, I am guessing that there are some holes in here, as this includes classtime and clinical time.

    It's at IUPUI in Indianapolis if anyone is familiar with the program!

    The kicker with the BSN vs. ASN is that where would I do my pre-reqs? The nursing programs around here offer either the ASN or BSN, there is no crossover. And, if you don't do the pre-reqs there, you are less likely to get in.

    I am more confident that I can get into the Accel BSN program, the applicant pool is much smaller, and they are tripling the number of students they take a year.
  9. by   MEO82
    I am also going thru the same dilemma - I have a BA in psych & HR. I don't have kids though. What about doing a traditional BSN program...? Perhaps you have enough credits to be able to do the traditional BSN in four semesters? Then, you have the BSN in the same amount of time it takes to get the ADN but not as stressful as the accelerated program? You would obviously have to speak with an adivsor to see how your credits would transfer... Just a thought...
  10. by   doubleplay
    I do not know why anyone would go the BSN route instead of the ADN way. In two years you can start working (the ADN way), and start your career. I also think that most hospitals will pay for your schooling if you work there. So you can get your BSN with no more money coming out of your pocket.
  11. by   np_wannabe
    Quote from doubleplay
    I do not know why anyone would go the BSN route instead of the ADN way. In two years you can start working (the ADN way), and start your career. I also think that most hospitals will pay for your schooling if you work there. So you can get your BSN with no more money coming out of your pocket.

    Because:

    1--if you want to go the NP route, you need the BSN
    2--in my area, the ADN is 16 months and the accelerated BSN is 13 months
    3--I've called all 7 hospitals in my area. they don't pay for school. they offer tuition reimbursement if you're working your way through school, but I can't do that.

    Just my

    Carla
  12. by   mvanz9999
    Quote from np_wannabe
    Because:

    1--if you want to go the NP route, you need the BSN
    2--in my area, the ADN is 16 months and the accelerated BSN is 13 months
    3--I've called all 7 hospitals in my area. they don't pay for school. they offer tuition reimbursement if you're working your way through school, but I can't do that.

    Just my

    Carla
    I have learned this as well. I think there is a lot of mis-information or mis-communication. I do not know of any hospitals that will pay FOR your schooling. It's tuition re-imbursement (you pay first) and it's never 100%. This is true for BSN or Masters.
  13. by   SummerGarden
    Quote from mvanz9999
    I have learned this as well. I think there is a lot of mis-information or mis-communication.
    Good point. The local hospitals and facilities in my area will give you $2000.00 scholarship to complete your ADN or BSN (but you must work for them part-time) or a $3000.00 reimbursement to be given over a 3 year period for either your ADN or BSN. Not to mention the $1200-2000 sign on bonus for a 3 year commitment that you do not get if you take the scholarship.

    With all of the loans people take out ($40,000-60,000 for a Regular BSN or $20,000-40,000 Accelerated BSN, where people already have old student loans), such programs are a JOKE! If people were better with math they would realize that nurses do not make enough to not feel POOR/BROKE after taking out that much debt once he/she starts working as a Registered Nurse! Alas, our society is bad at math!

    This is why, despite having a BA and a MBA I am going the ADN then RN-BSN route. It is cheaper and more cost effective (i.e. the rate of return for my financial investment in my education is greater taking this route compared to other routes). I am paying cash so far and will continue to do so. I am also applying for scholarships and looking for a sponsor, but if I do not get any additional assistance, I am good to go. Unlike my counterparts in the Accelerated or Regular programs. :wink2:
  14. by   MEO82
    Quote from MBA2BRN
    Good point. The local hospitals and facilities in my area will give you $2000.00 scholarship to complete your ADN or BSN (but you must work for them part-time) or a $3000.00 reimbursement to be given over a 3 year period for either your ADN or BSN. Not to mention the $1200-2000 sign on bonus for a 3 year commitment that you do not get if you take the scholarship.

    With all of the loans people take out ($40,000-60,000 for a Regular BSN or $20,000-40,000 Accelerated BSN, where people already have old student loans), such programs are a JOKE! If people were better with math they would realize that nurses do not make enough to not feel POOR/BROKE after taking out that much debt once he/she starts working as a Registered Nurse! Alas, our society is bad at math!

    This is why, despite having a BA and a MBA I am going the ADN then RN-BSN route. It is cheaper and more cost effective (i.e. the rate of return for my financial investment in my education is greater taking this route compared to other routes). I am paying cash so far and will continue to do so. I am also applying for scholarships and looking for a sponsor, but if I do not get any additional assistance, I am good to go. Unlike my counterparts in the Accelerated or Regular programs. :wink2:
    Yes, you have it all figured out. Thanks for enlightening us.

close