Undecided between Nursing :(

  1. So i am 24 years old, i have my AA degree in criminal justice. I decided to switch my career choice because i felt that it will be way to risky. i switched to nursing. I am also considering Physical therapy assistant. The only thing is that i am not interested in bedside nursing. I am really interested in public health nursing. However im sure ill need some type of experience bed side nursing. I just dont know if i should just go for nursing because i see a lot of negative videos on youtube but then i hear that a lot of people love their jobs. Another thing i know about is that you can do a lot with a nursing degree so that also inspires me to do nursing. I'm 24 right now and planned out my nursing future and by 2021 i should be working as an RN with my adn. I am just so hesitant about it :/
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    About nick007

    Joined: Mar '18; Posts: 17; Likes: 3
    Specialty: 1 year(s) of experience

    33 Comments

  3. by   YUKONrn
    I would go with PTA. I've worked with numerous PTA's and they make slightly less than nurses, but it's not nearly as stressful and you essentially work "normal" hours. If I could travel back 11 years in time I would have gone the PTA or COTA route.
  4. by   YUKONrn
    Heck I would go for my NP but I honestly think I would make less as a new grad NP than I make as an RN with 11 years experience in the ICU of an LTACH. If I told you what I make an hour your jaw would hit the floor. But it takes its toll on you. You're family life, mental health, physical health. Choose wisely.
  5. by   YUKONrn
    And I'd hate to be the bearer of bad news, but chances are you won't be able to land a job as a public health nurse without bedside nursing experience. You need at least 2 years of bedside experience before you can do almost anything else.
  6. by   nick007
    You feel that the RN life is too taxing on family life, mental health, and physical health? Thats what i hear but what if i was to do bedside for a while until i can do public health nursing?? You said the PTA's make slightly less than nursing do you know roughly the amount?
  7. by   Been there,done that
    An ADN in nursing, opens many doors. Just be prepared to pay your dues at the bedside. You might just find your niche, while you are doing that.

    Best wishes.
  8. by   brownbook
    I cannot imagine anyone basing their career decisions on videos they see on You Tube! Come on folks.....am I just being an old fuddy duddy or is that just crazy?

    But now I am curious, what do I look for on You Tube? "I hate my job as a nurse!" "Nursing sucks!" These couldn't be hospital based videos of nurses at work, that would be a HIPAA violation. How would the poster, or anybody, know if real nurses were posting these videos?
  9. by   nick007
    I understand what you are saying. Im not entirely choosing my career based off of these videos but i am the type of person to leave no stone left unturned. I do not want to make a mistake and regret in the future. But that is the problem. I'm scared to fail and i cant be if i want to be successful. I will figure this out. Thank you for your information
  10. by   brownbook
    Quote from nick007
    I understand what you are saying. Im not entirely choosing my career based off of these videos but i am the type of person to leave no stone left unturned. I do not want to make a mistake and regret in the future. But that is the problem. I'm scared to fail and i cant be if i want to be successful. I will figure this out. Thank you for your information
    Your reply makes sense. Thank goodness computers weren't invented when I was a nursing student, we didn't even have electricity . When I plan to purchase some minor or major item I spend day on the Internet getting so much conflicting opinion on what to get it makes me crazy.

    As others have posted on Allnures many times. Nurse come her to vent and complain. But I have loved my 34 nursing career.

    I wasn't born to be a nurse, nursing school and the first few years were a struggle. Not the book learning part. The patient's scared me to death, or I am going to make a mistake and kill someone part!
  11. by   CrunchRN
    I have had my ADN for 25 years. I have never worked acute care although I have huge respect for those that do. If you are smart about it is an effective route.
  12. by   nick007
    Would you recommend i go for nursing instead of physical therapy assistant? If i am not interested in bedside nursing is nursing not for me? I want to care for patients just not the chaos that comes in a hospital as a nurse taking care of 10 + people. I really would like to do public health nursing.
  13. by   nick007
    I understand. If i am not interested in bedside nursing which means taking care of 10+ people and running around in a hospital for 12 + hours, is nursing not for me?
  14. by   turtlesRcool
    Quote from nick007
    I understand. If i am not interested in bedside nursing which means taking care of 10+ people and running around in a hospital for 12 + hours, is nursing not for me?
    I work 8-hour shifts (okay, they're more like 9 or 10 by the time I finish giving report and charting), and usually have 5 patients on a med-surg floor. Night shift nurses usually have slightly larger assignments, but not 10+ patients. If you have 10+ patients who are sick enough to be in the hospital, that is not a safe assignment.

    So, I'm wondering if your lack of interest in hospital floor nursing comes from unrealistic expectations based on social media horror stories. Have you talked to real live nurses (not people posting on YouTube or AllNurses)? Asked them about a typical day? Their patient ratio? Because I love bedside nursing, but if it meant taking care of 10+ patients and running around in a hospital for 12+ hours, nursing wouldn't be for me, either.

    And there are many nurses who don't work in hospitals, and never have. Nurses work in home health, nursing homes, doctor's offices, and health clinics. Now, some of those jobs might want you to have bedside experience under your belt before they hire you, but, honestly, YOU might want that experience, too, before you take that on.

    One of the benefits of starting in a hospital is that they usually make sure you know what you're doing before letting you out on your own. Typically, you have a preceptor for the first few months, and even after that, if you have a question about something, there's always someone around you to ask. If you go out on your own doing home visits fresh out of school, you are quite likely to find yourself wishing for someone to support and guide you.

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