study methods of A&P?

  1. If anyone has any idea of studying methods of A&P, please direct me.
    My questions are posted below.
    1. What should I do when I disagree with a teacher's answer in a test? What I did was to argue, but no result.

    2. Which way do you think is the most effective way to memorize exactly and quickly?
    When I try to memorize words of A&P, what I do just repeats and repeats.


    3. Do you think the teacher's notebook is as important as the textbook or more important than the textbook? How to use both of them effectively? When I studied A&P, I mainly read the textbook instead of the teacher's notebook.

    4. Do you have any tip of dividing a heavy task, such as reading a chapter of the textbook? I spent five hours on reading the chapter, and always had little time to read the notebook after that.

    Any direction will be appreciated!!!!!!!

    Grace
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    About neurontin

    Joined: May '09; Posts: 76; Likes: 5

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  3. by   neurontin
    5. How to read the textbook of A&P? Each time I wrote the new words down when I read, and then I tried to memorize the important words. However, it seemed ineffective to me. When I had a test, there was always something I could not remember.
    Thanks!!!

    Grace
  4. by   CeilingCat
    The best approach for your situation may depend alot on your teacher, the curriculum, his/her testing style, and your own personal learning style.

    Here is what worked for me, but it may or may not apply to you:

    Quote from grace0804
    1. What should I do when I disagree with a teacher's answer in a test? What I did was to argue, but no result.
    I'd suggest not arguing. I'd approach it as a question : "I thought in class such-and-such did X and that's what I tried to explain, but you took points off. Do you have a moment to explain the detail of X?"

    Never confront a prof in front of other students. It can make them feel defensive. Wait until class is over or catch them in office hours.

    I also have the outlook that even the best students can misunderstand a questions sometimes. I aim for a 100% on my A&P exams, but I know even when I memorize everything perfectly, there's sure to be some little thing I misunderstood. In other words, just be really solid on all your studying, so one little misunderstanding won't knock you down a letter grade.

    2. Which way do you think is the most effective way to memorize exactly and quickly? When I try to memorize words of A&P, what I do just repeats and repeats.
    Depends on your personal learning style. I try to be as awake and attentive in class as I can, so I can get a start on absorbing things in class. Then I will re-write the notes. If it's a particularly confusing lecture, I'll put away those notes for a moment & I'll listen to my lecture tape, making all new notes. Then I'll compare the two to see where the misunderstanding might be.

    In our A&P class, the prof only tested on lecture material. I used the book only to clarify things. I also picked up a A-and-P made simple book which almost completely followed my professor's content.

    Study groups are so helpful!

    Flashcards and re-writing lists were helpful for me just for straight memorization.

    Definitely study a little each day. NEVER try to cram it in the day or two before an exam.

    3. Do you think the teacher's notebook is as important as the textbook or more important than the textbook? How to use both of them effectively? When I studied A&P, I mainly read the textbook instead of the teacher's notebook.
    Depends on the class and what you're tested on. Also depends on your textbook: some are good and some will just drown you in trivia. You can't learn everything about everything in 1 or 2 semesters, so try to find out what the professor finds is important.

    4. Do you have any tip of dividing a heavy task, such as reading a chapter of the textbook? I spent five hours on reading the chapter, and always had little time to read the notebook after that.
    Does she test on both lecture AND textbook? I'd try to figure out what she's looking for in exams, and I focus on that.

    If it's a really long painful chapter, I'd break reading it into subsections. I'd read and outline only that subsection, and then I'd review it until I understand. Only then would I move on. I'd budget my time so that I'd be done this whole process many days before an exam. This way I can re-read (a little more quickly) and work on filling gaps in my notes. Throughout the whole thing I am always asking myself: what is the key concept? Why is this important? Does this item have anything special about it? I try to make connections (oh wow, this is just like the epithelial tissue in such-and-such organ) or I try to look for patterns (it makes sense now why we need cilliated tissues here but not there).

    I do end of chapter textbook questions. I also did all the questions in that Barrons A-and-P made easy book. Anything I got wrong, I added to a 'fuzzy' list (things I was still unsure of). I'd put the books away for a few hours, then return to focus on the 'fuzzy' list. If there were a lot of words, such as the muscle system, I put the whole bunch of flashcards.

    I also liked to make counts of things (the # of items on any given list), so I'd always know if I knew a list or not. If I couldn't quickly summarize the __ functions of such-and-such, I KNEW that was an item to re-study.


    I think a big problem students have is knowing when to keep (or stop) studying. Then they're never sure if they're confident in the material, and nerves cause them to make silly mistakes on an exam. Between my self-testing and my study groups, I know I am ready when I can recite every concept or list the professor covered. Even better, when I help the struggling classmates, it helps me get better. I know I've mastered it when I can go through and explain it all to someone else. Sometimes we'd borrow an empty classroom, and we'd work on drawing systems on the whiteboard, correcting each other when mistakes were spotted.


    One last thing: on items I am still unsure about, I definitely get clarification from the professor before the exam. Be aware some texts, study guides, and online resources may disagree on some details or names, depending on when it was written. If you're unsure which is the more accurate answer, ask the prof, and go with whatever he/she says. Office hours are there for a reason! Don't expect tons of free tutoring, but any good prof will be happy to answer a list of questions you bring them. Some are great about replying via email, which means not having to wait for office hours. A bonus of talking to them one-on-one is that they see you're trying hard, and sometimes they'll throw you tidbits of advice to give you an edge.

    Good luck to you! I am just finishing my A&P Part 2 now, and I was able to hold a high A average in both Part 1 and 2. I believe anyone can get an A in A&P, if they're willing to put in the time (lots of time!). Just expect not to have much of a social life until it's over.
  5. by   neurontin
    Hi, CeilingCat, I appreciate your reply. It helps me a lot.
    Thank you very very much!!!
    hope you keep the best grades in all courses!!

    Grace
  6. by   The Dreamer
    Quote from CeilingCat
    I try to be as awake and attentive in class as I can, so I can get a start on absorbing things in class. Then I will re-write the notes. If it's a particularly confusing lecture, I'll put away those notes for a moment & I'll listen to my lecture tape, making all new notes. Then I'll compare the two to see where the misunderstanding might be.
    This is how I have aced all of my prerequisite classes so far - I record all of the lectures (make sure you get permission from the professor first, some of them really don't mind, and others don't allow it at all) and take notes during the lecture. Then, I go back after class or the next day and play the lecture back while I rewrite my notes....it helps to do this for two reasons, you are hearing/seeing the same information a second time which helps make it "stick" and you can catch something in the lecture a second time around that you might have missed and not written down the first time.

    Grace - that's the only advice I can give as far as memorization goes. There really is no "quick" way to memorize stuff. It is the repetitiveness of reading and hearing it over and over that makes it stick.....at least for me. Cramming before an exam does nothing for me except cause definitions, functions, names, etc. to get all mixed up in my head. If I have taken the time to study a few hours every day, then the night before an exam I just go over everything to make sure I have a good grasp on it. Anything that is questionable I will spend a bit more time on.
  7. by   onefrndlyghst
    Quote from grace0804
    If anyone has any idea of studying methods of A&P, please direct me.
    My questions are posted below.
    1. What should I do when I disagree with a teacher's answer in a test? What I did was to argue, but no result.

    I would suggest being prepared to show why you disagree with the answer. ie. The book shows X, but you said that the answer is Y. I would suggest strongly against arguing. Find a way to calmly state what you want to say, but don't argue with the teacher, especially in front of others (not saying you did this).

    2. Which way do you think is the most effective way to memorize exactly and quickly?
    When I try to memorize words of A&P, what I do just repeats and repeats.

    I am a hands on learner and I loved the coloring book that is available for A & P. It helped me tons with memorization. I also found a model of a skeleton at a school supply store and used that to help with memorization. Try to find something fun to help you learn it. There are tons of online resources with games and stuff for learning A & P. I would also suggest doing ALL of the review questions that are in the book, in each chapter. I usually found some of those on tests.

    3. Do you think the teacher's notebook is as important as the textbook or more important than the textbook? How to use both of them effectively? When I studied A&P, I mainly read the textbook instead of the teacher's notebook.

    I don't know what you mean about the teachers notebook. Is this something that the teacher put together? If so, I would study that and cross-reference it with the book.


    4. Do you have any tip of dividing a heavy task, such as reading a chapter of the textbook? I spent five hours on reading the chapter, and always had little time to read the notebook after that.

    Reading an A & P textbook can be difficult. Make sure you break it up into manageable time frames. Say, read for 20-30 minutes and then do something else. Come back in about 10 minutes and do some more. Trying to read it straight through probably causes you to lose focus on what you are reading.

    Any direction will be appreciated!!!!!!!

    Grace

    Good luck!!!
  8. by   neurontin
    CeilingCat, The Dreamer, and onefrndlyghst, thank you very much for the great words of wisdom!!
    I learn a lot from you.
    Thanks again!!!


    Grace
  9. by   onefrndlyghst
    You are welcome. Good luck in your class!
  10. by   Brighten
    I think it depends on how quick you can learn. I seen people cram and ace tests. For my anatomy class- what I did was learn the conceptual stuff from the chapter first and then started memorizing the stuff we needed to know. its easier when you know for example, about the basic pathway of a upper motor neuron before you start memorizing like all of the plexuses, nerves and what not.
  11. by   lightsnoise
    I agree with Brighten, I think the most pertinent thing in these kind of classes is to first get a hold of the conceptual material, then start memorizing. The best way to memorization is repetition--whatever strategy you may use cramming, chunking, etc. Remember you want this material to be ingrained into your short term memory so keep repeating the activity until you master the subject; and hopefully, you will also commit some of the things you learn in A&P into long term memory because that stuff is suppppppper legit.
  12. by   Cee_Lee_78
    1. What should I do when I disagree with a teacher's answer in a test? What I did was to argue, but no result.

    Schedule an appointment with them in their office, because confronting him/her in front of students is not well like of teachers or professors. Make sure you “understand” the question and what is being asked. Also, be prepared to reference what you disagree on and how it contradicts notes or textbook material. Keep in mind, some teachers will choose their own “verbiage”, as in lecture notes, as supposed to the textbooks “verbiage” when creating answers for exams, so you need to ask questions before exams to validate which is going to be the “correct” answer, the textbook or the lecture notes.

    2. Which way do you think is the most effective way to memorize exactly and quickly?
    When I try to memorize words of A&P, what I do just repeats and repeats.

    If you are planning on being a Registered Nurse, then I don’t fully suggest memorizing; you have a greater chance of forgetting the material needed for the future. The material you learn is all related to how your body functions, which is all helpful when you work as a Nurse. Use someone like a friend, relative, or significant other to point to certain body organs and explain a little of what you know about it to them. Also, if the teacher permits, take photos of the Anatomy models or any lab posters/materials that you can review on your computer in conjunction with your notes and textbook. You will better understand what you are learning and it will automatically process in your brain. If you need to learn definitions then rewriting it over a few times for a few days could help as well.

    3. Do you think the teacher's notebook is as important as the textbook or more important than the textbook? How to use both of them effectively? When I studied A&P, I mainly read the textbook instead of the teacher's notebook.

    I would take the teacher’s notebook and use it as a reference guide for the textbook. If the notebook has a page focused just on the brain stem then focus your attention on what the textbook teaches about the brain stem along with what the teacher is trying to teach you about the brain stem, using both as information for your exams; some information will overlap. Keep in mind that it all depends on the teacher’s style of teaching. One teacher I had was redundant of the textbook material, another gave a whole new perspective on the subject-never using the textbook except for images, while my most recent teacher used both lecture notes and textbook material but exam questions were in the teacher’s “verbiage”.


    4. Do you have any tip of dividing a heavy task, such as reading a chapter of the textbook? I spent five hours on reading the chapter, and always had little time to read the notebook after that.

    Do not read it word for word. Skip areas that are hard to grasp and go back to it later in the day. If there are images or figures to explain a process then read a few steps, look back at the image, then read a few more steps. I never read a chapter word for word and still I was able to Ace my A&P courses.

    All in all get to know your teacher’s style of teaching and expectations with exams and do not be afraid to ask questions to not just the teacher but to students who are doing great in the class. And this is nursing prereq courses so give yourself time to grasp the material, last minute cramming will not help, I know from own experience. To a certain extent animated videos on YouTube helped as well, but not all information can be a dependable reference.
  13. by   neurontin
    Hi, Cee Lee 78, I greatly appreciate your direction!

    Sincerely,
    Grace

  14. by   neurontin
    Brighten and SabreVision,
    thank you as well. I appreciate your suggestions.

    Sincerely,
    Grace

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