Seeking Advice about ADN. Please Help!!

  1. Hi everyone.

    I am currently strongly considering going back to school for an Associates degree in Nursing.

    I am currently a Dialysis PCT, and I am going on my FOURTH year! The emphasis on the time is because I certainly didn't plan on being in this position for this long. When I first started this job, I was in the final year of my MBA program. My plan was two work as a PCT for 2 years and combine that experience with my MBA to become a Facility Administrator. Here it 4 years later and I am in the same position, and I can honestly admit that I am lost.

    The time I have spent in this job has not allowed me to gain much experience in another field. (B.S. in Economics, as well). But at this rate, it seems as though my experience in healthcare along with my MBA is STILL not enough to land me an opportunity in Healthcare Administration. I have NO idea what I have or am doing wrong. So now I look to get the ADN in hopes that it presents more opportunities so I can feel fulfilled as a professional and provide for my daughter.

    BSN seems to be the way to go for management jobs, but at this point I'm looking for the ADN to combine with my credentials and land me a CAREER, ASAP. I welcome any and all advice, knowledge, theories, and/or answers. Especially stories that are similar.

    God Bless!
  2. Visit brynryn17 profile page

    About brynryn17

    Joined: Jan '18; Posts: 7; Likes: 2
    from TX , US
    Specialty: 1 year(s) of experience

    15 Comments

  3. by   Here.I.Stand
    You really don't belong in a nursing management position without nursing experience anyway... I mean, how can one realistically expect to be an effective leader in a discipline that one has no knowledge of?

    Nursing administration is a fine goal, but first you need to learn to be a nurse. As long as there's a market for ADNs in your area, going that route can be a great plan. You can work as an RN while completing your BSN, providing for your daughter and gaining necessary experience.
  4. by   brynryn17
    Thanks for getting back to me. Well the Facility Administrator position is not actually a "nurse" management position. Its more of an operations position dealing with scheduling, budgeting, inventory, compliance, etc. I have experience doing all of that from previous jobs, and some in my current position as well.

    The thing is, about 75% of ALL management positions in healthcare require a nursing degree, mostly for salary purposes. It basically kills two with one. The other 25% usually goes too non-clinical professionals. Alot of times they hire nurses, and then train them in business operations.

    As far as the nurses in my field, for the most part, I know exactly what they know because I do exactly what they do. The title allows them perform things that I am not legally allowed to do, yet I still know how to do them.

    My capabilities are not my concern. I'm more concerned with the time and money that I have to invest in another degree. Just wondering if it's worth it or if there is a better option to get me where I want to be. Which is why I am seeking advice from nurses who may have some insight on scenario.
  5. by   idkmybffjill
    I'm not sure exactly what type of facility you work at, but a lot of the administrators of assisted living facilities I've met don't have any nursing or medical degrees. But that's probably because Florida state regulations don't require really anything other than a high school diploma, completion of a specific training course, and passing a test to be able to run an ALF. It might depend on your state, but ALFs could be an option for at least finding a higher up administrative role.

    However, if it's normal for facility administrator roles in your state to require some type of nursing degree, I'd imagine it'd be worth it to at least do an LPN or ADN program.
  6. by   Okami_CCRN
    Error in Reply
  7. by   brynryn17
    Thanks for the advice. I took the time to look up some administrator positions in ALF's, and like you said, most don't require a nursing degree, but they do require some experience. I would have to find a way to get them to accept my healthcare experience along with my education as a substitute. Still there are definitely possibilities there. Thanks! Also I was born and raised in Florida, and started out with the company I'm with now there!
  8. by   dianah
    Moved to Pre-Nursing Forum
  9. by   ItsThatJenGirl
    Quote from brynryn17
    Thanks for getting back to me. Well the Facility Administrator position is not actually a "nurse" management position. Its more of an operations position dealing with scheduling, budgeting, inventory, compliance, etc. I have experience doing all of that from previous jobs, and some in my current position as well.

    The thing is, about 75% of ALL management positions in healthcare require a nursing degree, mostly for salary purposes. It basically kills two with one. The other 25% usually goes too non-clinical professionals. Alot of times they hire nurses, and then train them in business operations.

    As far as the nurses in my field, for the most part, I know exactly what they know because I do exactly what they do. The title allows them perform things that I am not legally allowed to do, yet I still know how to do them.

    My capabilities are not my concern. I'm more concerned with the time and money that I have to invest in another degree. Just wondering if it's worth it or if there is a better option to get me where I want to be. Which is why I am seeking advice from nurses who may have some insight on scenario.
    That's a bold statement.

    I wouldn't get a nursing degree if you don't want to be a nurse. The degree path is unique and pretty intense.

    I just did a quick search for your area, and it looks like you need a degree in the health care field. Maybe something like Public Health or Health Information Management would suit you better.
  10. by   brynryn17
    Hello. Yeah it was a pretty bold statement lol. I hope it didn't come off arrogant. It's speaking solely on my personal experiences date, and not the nursing profession as a whole. Utmost respect to all nurses.

    To continue, years ago many people tried to steer me towards becoming a nurse and I would say exactly what you said, "why become a nurse, if I don't want to be one." After years in this position, I'm starting to feel like a nurse. So I'm really searching for the pros and cons of a decision like this.

    And yes, I've also looked into HIM and Health Service Management programs also. So we'll see. Thank you so much for the input !!
  11. by   RainbowSprinkles
    I have a bachelors in business management and I have never been in a managerial position, so I can understand your frustration. I don't think getting a degree is the answer. Getting out of your current position may help. I'm not sure where you live, but last year I worked at NYU Langone hospital in NY as a medical secretary for 6 months. I bust my butt and they was ready to promote me so fast, unfortunately I relocated for my partner. My girlfriend worked there as well as a secretary within 2 years she was promoted to manager. Granted, NYU is a huge company with many benefits and opportunities to move up. I think you need to focus on ways to get your foot in the right door.
  12. by   RainbowSprinkles
    Be willing to start low and climb
    Even with a master's degree, your first job is likely to be low on the ladder. You may start out as an administrative assistant in a financial department, or as an assistant administrator for a small facility, says Michael Hoff, health care manager of business development at Chicago-based Addison Group, which recruits nonclinical health care employees.

    Boroff says many health care employers are focused on cost, so they're willing to look at people straight out of college or grad school who are willing to commit for the long haul. "If you want to be in health care in that setting, find any door to get your foot into," he says. "Work hard and work your way up the ladder."

    At grad school, look for internships, residencies or fellowships that can help you get your foot in the door and establish a career history. If you're crossing over to health care management, highlight your stability in your previous roles. Networking may also come in handy in terms of breaking into the field. Many health care management employees once began their careers in public accounting or consulting, then moved into health care through client contacts, Samuel says.

    Above all else, employers that are hiring health care management candidates are looking for stability, even in entry-level positions, Boroff says. They want people who have been in jobs for several years or who have some kind of progressive work history, he says: "They don't want to hire someone who's been jumping around.

    How to Land Your First Health Care Management Job | Monster.com
  13. by   kbrn2002
    If you are talking about a long term care administrator position an MBA combined with nursing probably wouldn't get you there. The facility administrator position is not nursing related, so nursing education wouldn't be an asset. What you need is a nursing home administrator degree. It's not a degree offered on every university campus, the closest one to where I live is about 150 miles away. We have a student in his final year doing his internship with our ED so I know from him that an internship is part of the curriculum. The good news is an MBA is a great starting point for that degree, you should be able to finish a LTC administrator degree within 18-24 months if you already have the MBA. Search your state university system to see where it's offered in your state.
  14. by   Here.I.Stand
    Quote from brynryn17
    Hello. Yeah it was a pretty bold statement lol. I hope it didn't come off arrogant. It's speaking solely on my personal experiences date, and not the nursing profession as a whole. Utmost respect to all nurses.

    To continue, years ago many people tried to steer me towards becoming a nurse and I would say exactly what you said, "why become a nurse, if I don't want to be one." After years in this position, I'm starting to feel like a nurse. So I'm really searching for the pros and cons of a decision like this.

    And yes, I've also looked into HIM and Health Service Management programs also. So we'll see. Thank you so much for the input !!
    Arrogant? Maybe, maybe not... but definitely shows that you don't know what you don't know. Do the dialysis RNs and/or nephrologists concur that your knowledge as a dialysis tech is equivalent to that of a licensed RN?

    Just a piece of friendly advice; it's not helpful for you to present yourself this way... especially considering most people WOULD determine you to be arrogant as opposed to merely ignorant.

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