School Accreditation: Important?

  1. Does NLNAC or AACE/CCNE accreditation have any weight on which school you will attend? Why or why not? Does it determine the quality of the school? There are a couple of schools in Metro Detroit area that do not have any of the above affiliations - I'm considering applying to one. This school said they didn't want to pay the money to be accredited but I'm not sure if it should be minimized to a money or status thing. Any insight will be appreciated.

    Thanks
  2. Visit Just_An_Illusion profile page

    About Just_An_Illusion

    Joined: Aug '06; Posts: 143; Likes: 28

    10 Comments

  3. by   EricJRN
    For most people, the biggest determinant is whether or not the program is approved by your state board of nursing. If it is, you'll be able to take the NCLEX and receive licensure. Accreditation may come into play when you're applying to graduate school.
  4. by   2bNurseNik
    The school that I was considering getting my BSN from says:

    In addition to the Undergraduate Admission Criteria outlined previously, the following criteria are considered when reviewing an application to the BSN program:
    1. Graduation from a nursing program accredited by NLNAC. Applicants who have graduated from non-NLNAC accredited programs will be required to successfully complete selected NLN Mobility Achievement Tests.
    2. Current Missouri licensure as a registered nurse or license-eligible.*
    *The admission status of license-eligible applicants is conditional pending proof of licensure.

    1. RNs entering the BSN program from NLNAC-accredited diploma programs will be awarded up to 36 credits in recognition of prior knowledge. Following payment of posting fees, credits will be entered on the transcript.
    2. RNs who graduated from non-NLNAC-accredited programs must successfully complete three NLN Mobility Profile Achievement Tests (Medical-Surgical Nursing, Maternal-Child Nursing and Psychiatric Nursing). Thirty-six credits will be awarded following payment of posting fees.
    Hope this helps!
  5. by   Just_An_Illusion
    Quote from NikNik
    The school that I was considering getting my BSN from says:

    In addition to the Undergraduate Admission Criteria outlined previously, the following criteria are considered when reviewing an application to the BSN program:
    1. Graduation from a nursing program accredited by NLNAC. Applicants who have graduated from non-NLNAC accredited programs will be required to successfully complete selected NLN Mobility Achievement Tests.
    2. Current Missouri licensure as a registered nurse or license-eligible.*
    *The admission status of license-eligible applicants is conditional pending proof of licensure.

    1. RNs entering the BSN program from NLNAC-accredited diploma programs will be awarded up to 36 credits in recognition of prior knowledge. Following payment of posting fees, credits will be entered on the transcript.
    2. RNs who graduated from non-NLNAC-accredited programs must successfully complete three NLN Mobility Profile Achievement Tests (Medical-Surgical Nursing, Maternal-Child Nursing and Psychiatric Nursing). Thirty-six credits will be awarded following payment of posting fees.
    Hope this helps!
    Wow, very interesting. I do plan on getting my BSN after completing my ASN in 2009 or just going for my BSN if I don't get into the program for winter '08. I better start doing a little digging into my preferred institutions to see if these stipulations exits with them. Thanks for the info.
  6. by   2bNurseNik
    Quote from Just_An_Illusion
    Wow, very interesting. I do plan on getting my BSN after completing my ASN in 2009 or just going for my BSN if I don't get into the program for winter '08. I better start doing a little digging into my preferred institutions to see if these stipulations exits with them. Thanks for the info.
    What sucks is...the school I was accepted to has "conditional approval" by the state boards. I need to do more digging as well!!
  7. by   Just_An_Illusion
    Quote from NikNik
    What sucks is...the school I was accepted to has "conditional approval" by the state boards. I need to do more digging as well!!
    What do they mean by 'conditional approval'? Sounds like this school is having some licensing issues. Are you still considering to go to this school?
  8. by   2bNurseNik
    Quote from Just_An_Illusion
    What do they mean by 'conditional approval'? Sounds like this school is having some licensing issues. Are you still considering to go to this school?
    Well, the state requires a minimum pass rate of 80%. They currenty have a 70% and previously had 47%. They're supposed to be making some changes to "improve" things but who knows how long that will take.

    No, I don't think I will attend even though I was accepted .
  9. by   Wsmith16
    Wow! I had the same question over the weekend and did some research. I learned that if the school you are appplying to is a two year program and is approved by your state and you are allowed to sit for the NCLEX exam then it is ok. Because that means your program is accredidated by your state.

    The only time I found that a problem occurred is if you pursue a bachelors degree from a non-NLN/CCNE school, it will be edifficult to go for a MSN so that is not a good idea.

    So, If you get an associates be sure that the BSN comes from a NLN/CCNE college.

    If there are further doubts just check the BSN programs in your area and see if they have preferential treatment for acceptance of students who come from non-NLN 2 yr schools. The BSN programs in my area just wanted RNs to have their state license. The schools seem to urge RNs to pursue their BSN so I haven't found too many restrictions.

    Also the school that you are applying to may even have an articulation agreement with some BSN your programs in your area and if that is the case then you are all set.
  10. by   Just_An_Illusion
    Quote from NikNik
    Well, the state requires a minimum pass rate of 80%. They currenty have a 70% and previously had 47%. They're supposed to be making some changes to "improve" things but who knows how long that will take.

    No, I don't think I will attend even though I was accepted .
    47% pass rate??? OMG !!!!!! I don't blame you for passing up that offer. Something is very very wrong if more than half of their students can't pass boards. Did you apply anywhere else?

    Good luck to you.
  11. by   2bNurseNik
    Quote from Just_An_Illusion
    47% pass rate??? OMG !!!!!! I don't blame you for passing up that offer. Something is very very wrong if more than half of their students can't pass boards. Did you apply anywhere else?

    Good luck to you.

    I did but I probably won't get in until 2009. I'm going to also try the community college.
  12. by   Just_An_Illusion
    Quote from Wsmith16
    Wow! I had the same question over the weekend and did some research. I learned that if the school you are appplying to is a two year program and is approved by your state and you are allowed to sit for the NCLEX exam then it is ok. Because that means your program is accredidated by your state.

    The only time I found that a problem occurred is if you pursue a bachelors degree from a non-NLN/CCNE school, it will be edifficult to go for a MSN so that is not a good idea.

    So, If you get an associates be sure that the BSN comes from a NLN/CCNE college.

    If there are further doubts just check the BSN programs in your area and see if they have preferential treatment for acceptance of students who come from non-NLN 2 yr schools. The BSN programs in my area just wanted RNs to have their state license. The schools seem to urge RNs to pursue their BSN so I haven't found too many restrictions.

    Also the school that you are applying to may even have an articulation agreement with some BSN your programs in your area and if that is the case then you are all set.
    Thanks for the info. I'm going to do some investigating tonight. Just to be on the safe side, I think I should go with my other two options that do have NLNAC or CCNE acceditations. It's safer that way.

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