Repeating a course? - page 2

I was wondering if I should repeat my A&P 1 class because I know I'm going to get a B or at least between a 3.0 and 3.4 which is definitely not good in Washington state. People get 4.0's all the... Read More

  1. by   mrsb04
    Quote from swtstephy
    It's that i know there are a lot of factors but really the schools I am hoping for is Seattle Pacific University, Seattle University or Pacific Lutheran University. THe thing is that usually the cut off GPA is 3.7. And the programs in Washington State are top in the country basically, compared to the east coast. YOu can get into a nursing program with an average of 2.5 or above here it's about 3.5 or above. I basically slacked off and I'm thinking I'm going to get a 3.1 which is a B. I know I can do way better! I am just really wanting to get a higher grade!
    Have you thought about applying to community college ADN programs in the area. I know most of them are as strict as the universities, but some community colleges have a lottery program and a minimun GPA of only 3.0. Seattle Central CC has a prgrm, Bellevue CC, North Seattle CC, Shorline CC, if you are looking for schools in the northend. I am not sure what their minimun GPA's are...but you can look into it. Where about do you live? I live in Lake Tapps.
  2. by   js408
    The standard for California colleges is to only allow you to repeat a class if you get a failing grade or if there is a significant lapse of time (like 5 or 10 years). The standard of transfer acceptance for California State University nursing schools is to average together all grades. So if you took a class and got a C and then retake it and get an A, both grades will be averaged together and will have the effect of a B.

    My personal bias is that students should not be allowed to repeat a class if they got a passing grade. An A on your transcript means that you worked hard and got the job done in the time allotted, which is 16 weeks for a regular semester course. If you need to take the same class twice in order to get an A then your A isn't really equivalent to someone who took the class once and got an A. The student who took the class once was able to get the job done in 16 weeks whereas the student who took the class twice got the job done in 32 weeks. Big big difference. It's not really fair to those of us who worked our tails off to get the A in 16 weeks. Anyone can get an A after retaking the class and getting 32 weeks to learn what should be learnable in 16 weeks. But that's just my personal bias.

    Quote from gentylwind
    This is just plain incorrect. Most schools WILL allow you retake a course, though some do limit how many times. Getting a higher grade will always make you more competitive as many consider only the higher score. That is how it is at my school.
  3. by   ♪♫ in my ♥
    Quote from gentylwind
    Most schools WILL allow you retake a course...
    Careful with "most" unless you can back it up. The public schools in my neck of the woods accept retakes only for D's and F's. By the same token, when you do repeat a class, regardless of your score, both grades are still on your transcript.

    Perhaps your "most" is correct but it certainly doesn't apply around here.

    Call the school to find out how they handle a repeated course... You'll have a lot more powerful knowledge than generalized opinions given on the Internet from people who have no knowledge of the school you want to get into
    Very sage advice... I often wonder why people come to the internet rather than asking the people in A&R who actually know the real answer.
  4. by   js408
    Every school I've looked at publishes a yearly course catalog. The first chapter of the course catalog usually has the school's policies including the policy on retaking classes. No need to even contact the school, just read the course catalog.

    Quote from ♪♫ in my ♥
    Careful with "most" unless you can back it up. The public schools in my neck of the woods accept retakes only for D's and F's. By the same token, when you do repeat a class, regardless of your score, both grades are still on your transcript.

    Perhaps your "most" is correct but it certainly doesn't apply around here.



    Very sage advice... I often wonder why people come to the internet rather than asking the people in A&R who actually know the real answer.
  5. by   mrsb04
    Quote from js408
    The standard for California colleges is to only allow you to repeat a class if you get a failing grade or if there is a significant lapse of time (like 5 or 10 years). The standard of transfer acceptance for California State University nursing schools is to average together all grades. So if you took a class and got a C and then retake it and get an A, both grades will be averaged together and will have the effect of a B.

    My personal bias is that students should not be allowed to repeat a class if they got a passing grade. An A on your transcript means that you worked hard and got the job done in the time allotted, which is 16 weeks for a regular semester course. If you need to take the same class twice in order to get an A then your A isn't really equivalent to someone who took the class once and got an A. The student who took the class once was able to get the job done in 16 weeks whereas the student who took the class twice got the job done in 32 weeks. Big big difference. It's not really fair to those of us who worked our tails off to get the A in 16 weeks. Anyone can get an A after retaking the class and getting 32 weeks to learn what should be learnable in 16 weeks. But that's just my personal bias.
    I understand your bias but at the same time, LIFE HAPPENS...some people have unforntunate situations fall upon them and their school grades and success are affected. Why should somone be punished and not allowed to repeat a class for that? I believe everyone deserves a second chance, and if you blow that second chance, that is your own fault. I myself have to repeat a few classes, but you better believe that I will work my A$$ off to get the best darn grade I can get.
  6. by   js408
    If life happens then you need to deal with it or drop the course and retake it next semester. In California colleges you're allowed to drop a course up until 75% of class meetings are completed. So for a 16 week class you can drop the course until the end of week 12. If you go past week 12 and you need to drop the course because of a life event that causes you to be unable to continue the class, your school dean can allow you to drop the course with a W.

    Quote from mrsb04
    I understand your bias but at the same time, LIFE HAPPENS...some people have unforntunate situations fall upon them and their school grades and success are affected. Why should somone be punished and not allowed to repeat a class for that? I believe everyone deserves a second chance, and if you blow that second chance, that is your own fault. I myself have to repeat a few classes, but you better believe that I will work my A$$ off to get the best darn grade I can get.
  7. by   mrsb04
    Quote from js408
    If life happens then you need to deal with it or drop the course and retake it next semester. In California colleges you're allowed to drop a course up until 75% of class meetings are completed. So for a 16 week class you can drop the course until the end of week 12. If you go past week 12 and you need to drop the course because of a life event that causes you to be unable to continue the class, your school dean can allow you to drop the course with a W.
    All the school in WA are different, some programs allow repeats, some of them don't. You should be a little more sensitive to others out there. We are all working hard towards a common goal. You could be in one of our shoes at any time. It's tough, I know this, but you should try putting yourself in our shoes. We will all be nurses some day.
  8. by   js408
    I work full time and go to class at night and on weekends. Last year I had to miss a week of classes because my baby was born in the middle of the spring semester and I spent a whole week in the hospital. Stuff happens to all of us and you have to deal with it or drop the class. Sorry if I sound insensitive but if you believe you aren't going to get the grade you want then drop the class and retake it.

    Once you complete the class and get a grade, that's your grade and it's not really fair to just redo the class so you can get a better grade. It's not fair to the students who work double hard and take notes until their hands go numb and put their entire life on hold and make huge sacrifices to get the job done in the time allotted for a single semester.

    Quote from mrsb04
    All the school in WA are different, some programs allow repeats, some of them don't. You should be a little more sensitive to others out there. We are all working hard towards a common goal. You could be in one of our shoes at any time. It's tough, I know this, but you should try putting yourself in our shoes. We will all be nurses some day.
  9. by   Ms. Nurse Assistant
    Quote from js408
    The standard for California colleges is to only allow you to repeat a class if you get a failing grade or if there is a significant lapse of time (like 5 or 10 years). The standard of transfer acceptance for California State University nursing schools is to average together all grades. So if you took a class and got a C and then retake it and get an A, both grades will be averaged together and will have the effect of a B.

    My personal bias is that students should not be allowed to repeat a class if they got a passing grade. An A on your transcript means that you worked hard and got the job done in the time allotted, which is 16 weeks for a regular semester course. If you need to take the same class twice in order to get an A then your A isn't really equivalent to someone who took the class once and got an A. The student who took the class once was able to get the job done in 16 weeks whereas the student who took the class twice got the job done in 32 weeks. Big big difference. It's not really fair to those of us who worked our tails off to get the A in 16 weeks. Anyone can get an A after retaking the class and getting 32 weeks to learn what should be learnable in 16 weeks. But that's just my personal bias.
    That is really unrealisitic. Some ppl are just better at certain subjects than others and can grasp onto the concepts a lot quicker. That is just life, there are very few people who are geniuses and can pass any subject matter with an A no matter how complex the material is. I'd rather a person retake a subject that they are not that good at a second time around to get a better understanding than to remain ignorant about it and never know it.
  10. by   Ms. Nurse Assistant
    Quote from js408
    I work full time and go to class at night and on weekends. Last year I had to miss a week of classes because my baby was born in the middle of the spring semester and I spent a whole week in the hospital. Stuff happens to all of us and you have to deal with it or drop the class. Sorry if I sound insensitive but if you believe you aren't going to get the grade you want then drop the class and retake it.

    Once you complete the class and get a grade, that's your grade and it's not really fair to just redo the class so you can get a better grade. It's not fair to the students who work double hard and take notes until their hands go numb and put their entire life on hold and make huge sacrifices to get the job done in the time allotted for a single semester.
    I'm sorry but are you being for real? How is someone else retaking a class taking anything away from you?
  11. by   ♪♫ in my ♥
    Quote from js408
    In California colleges you're allowed to drop a course up until 75% of class meetings are completed.
    Careful with the generalizations... At Cal Poly one could drop through the first week (10%). After that one needed to petition to the Dean for withdrawal for "urgent and compelling reasons."
  12. by   caliotter3
    Quote from ♪♫ in my ♥
    Careful with the generalizations... At Cal Poly one could drop through the first week (10%). After that one needed to petition to the Dean for withdrawal for "urgent and compelling reasons."
    You also want to avoid a "W" on your transcipts if possible. Some schools will show nothing if you drop by a certain date, will record "W" later, and there is a date where the W becomes W-failing or W-passing, then the drop dead date, where you can't withdraw at all. W's, if too many over a period of time, can be detrimental.
  13. by   swtstephy
    Quote from mrsb04
    Have you thought about applying to community college ADN programs in the area. I know most of them are as strict as the universities, but some community colleges have a lottery program and a minimun GPA of only 3.0. Seattle Central CC has a prgrm, Bellevue CC, North Seattle CC, Shorline CC, if you are looking for schools in the northend. I am not sure what their minimun GPA's are...but you can look into it. Where about do you live? I live in Lake Tapps.
    The community colleges believe it or not are harder to get into than the private schools because of the tuition. When my friend got in to a private school her GPA was 3.6 and the lowest cut off was 3.3 I believe she said in 2006 the cut off for the community college in my area to a span of 2 hours away was a 3.8

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