Nursing or MD??

  1. I am a college senior waiting to hear back from a few nursing programs. However, a big part of me wants to drop nursing and go MD. I had originally chose to get my BSN because I didn't want to go to school for an additional 7+ years. I want to have a family and be a great mother, while enjoying a great career. However, the more I read about medicine, the more I want to go to medical school. I would love to be an OBGYN, but I know they have crazy schedules. A few female doctors have suggested family practice as it has better scheduling and I can deliver babies, work with women, and many more.
    I don't want to go into medical school blind and find out my 3rd year that I don't like it and wish I would have gotten my BSN. Does anyone have any suggestions or thoughts?? I only lack 3 courses to finish med school prereqs... Thanks.
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    About Queen_Nefertiri

    Joined: Jul '18; Posts: 4; Likes: 2

    11 Comments

  3. by   Sour Lemon
    You might want to check out student doctor network and see what they have to say.
  4. by   dianah
    Moved to Pre-Nursing Student forum.
  5. by   Luckyyou
    Have you taken the MCAT?
  6. by   Queen_Nefertiri
    I have not. I wanted to take ochem and physics first.
  7. by   forevernursem
    Nursing and medicine are both very different careers. I would do a TON of research before you make a decision. If you decide that your heart is with medicine, I would go in that direction, even if it's a few extra years. Also, to become an NP you would have to get a BSN (4 years) plus 2 years of NP school, so thats 6 years all together, if you go full time. That's not including if you take time off from school just to work or gain experience. So, thats still a lot of schooling.

    I know so many doctors and pre-med students who are married, or have children, and are balancing their lives just fine. I wouldn't let that hold you back.

    Best of luck.
  8. by   elkpark
    Quote from forevernursem
    Also, to become an NP you would have to get a BSN (4 years) plus 2 years of NP school, so thats 6 years all together, if you go full time. That's not including if you take time off from school just to work or gain experience. So, thats still a lot of schooling.
    The OP notes that s/he is currently a college senior. If s/he finishes out a degree in anything else, s/he could get into a direct entry NP program that would take only three years, or ABSN program followed by an MSN NP program that would also take only ~three years. It would not take six years for someone who already has a degree. Even without going through an accelerated BSN program, people who already have all their prerequisites done can, if they are willing to move to wherever they can get into a program, transfer into a traditional BSN program that is set up as two years of general ed and two years of nursing (as many are), and finish a traditional BSN in around two years (followed by a two-year MSN program to become an NP).
    Last edit by elkpark on Jul 3
  9. by   jalilly
    First of all, I totally see how this must be a stressful time for you. My best advice is to not make any decisions too fast, and whatever decision you end up making will be a good one. Both medicine and nursing are very rewarding careers. As a nurse I could spend lots of time convincing you to be a nurse because I love it! My best advice is to spend more time with doctors and nurses. If you have any friends who are doctors or nurses, ask them to get coffee with you, shadow nurses and doctors, get a job in healthcare, or volunteer at a hospital. Meet the doctors and nurses, ask them what they like and dislike about their careers and go from there. If you meet nurses and you connect with them, could see them as future friends, and relate to their passion I would recommend going for nursing (or vice versa). Make a pros and cons list. Remember that plenty of doctors get married and have families. Don't let that desire keep you from medicine. Also remember that you can be a leader, manager, educator, or nurse practitioner if you go the nursing route and there's lots of flexibility in the career. If you aren't 100% sure that nursing is the path for you, don't go to nursing school because you can always apply again. In the meantime, get volunteer experience and a job in healthcare (such as a CNA job). I hope this was helpful for you. Good luck!
  10. by   xxbeach
    MD > NP
  11. by   Queen_Nefertiri
    Quote from jalilly
    First of all, I totally see how this must be a stressful time for you. My best advice is to not make any decisions too fast, and whatever decision you end up making will be a good one. Both medicine and nursing are very rewarding careers. As a nurse I could spend lots of time convincing you to be a nurse because I love it!
    Thank you for your kind words and understanding! I will make sure to get more involved personally, in the hospital and healthcare settings to get a feel for what I want in my life. I worked as a CNA for a year and a half, but that was at an assistant living home so it wasn't very much of an exposure. Just out of curiosity, what nursing specialty do you enjoy the most??
  12. by   ProperlySeasoned
    Here's the elephant in the room - It is far, far, more difficult to get into medical school that a nursing program. Take an honest look at not just your desire to be a physician, but your academic reality. When you are in college, can you get A's in advanced science classes? Can you do well on your MCAT? Can you engage in other pursuits to show you are well rounded? Can you afford, emotionally and financially, to spend a year applying to medical schools, get rejected, and then decide to keep on applying? The simple truth is there are far more highly qualified medical school candidates than there are slots in American schools.
  13. by   maxrand
    Quote from xxbeach
    MD > NP
    If you look at it from one side, yes. Each profession has pros and cons. NP>MD in regards of initial earnings, tuition cost and associated loans, length and intensity of studies. Also it's much easier to get in.

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