I need help choosing courses!

  1. I am a high school student currently trying to plan out my future, post-secondary. I want to become a registered nurse, but since the courses I am taking in high school are college level, I am not qualified to apply for the BSN/BScN... I was thinking of applying for a practical nursing program (Humber, centennial, George brown, Seneca), then after the 2 year program, I move forward and apply for a bridging program (Centennial, George brown,ryerson)... Is this the right choice? Any other options I can take? If I do take this route, any school recommendations that provide the best in these courses?? Please I need all the help I can get...
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  2. Visit hn7201 profile page

    About hn7201

    Joined: Jun '18; Posts: 6
    from CA

    17 Comments

  3. by   meanmaryjean
    Quote from hn7201
    I am a high school student currently trying to plan out my future, post-secondary. I want to become a registered nurse, but since the courses I am taking in high school are college level, I am not qualified to apply for the BSN/BScN... I was thinking of applying for a practical nursing program (Humber, centennial, George brown, Seneca), then after the 2 year program, I move forward and apply for a bridging program (Centennial, George brown,ryerson)... Is this the right choice? Any other options I can take? If I do take this route, any school recommendations that provide the best in these courses?? Please I need all the help I can get...
    I do not understand this at all. Taking college courses in high school DISqualifies you for a BSN? In what way? Are you sure?
  4. by   PartyTheNightAway
    Speak with your counselor at school. You are really misinformed about this topic.
  5. by   hn7201
    When I say "College level courses" I mean that they are high school courses but applied level (courses only qualified for college)...
  6. by   hn7201
    OK thank you... Now what topic may i have been misinformed about?
  7. by   Glucagon
    You may need to explain more about what type of courses you are taking for people to better help? Because I've never heard of college-level courses that are taken in high school that also disqualify people from getting a BSN. I took college classes during high school via dual enrollment and have had no issue with those credit.
  8. by   hn7201
    Edited: I am thinking of taking a practical nursing program (college), than afterwards I move up to a nursing bridging program (university) to become a registered nurse... Is this a good plan? Any colleges/ universities do you recommend that provide these programs?
  9. by   KelRN215
    Quote from hn7201
    Edited: I am thinking of taking a practical nursing program (college), than afterwards I move up to a nursing bridging program (university) to become a registered nurse... Is this a good plan? Any colleges/ universities do you recommend that provide these programs?
    No, it isn't. It's going to take longer and cost you more money in the long run. In your situation, the best thing to do is go to a 4 year university for a BSN.

    As others have said, you are seriously misinformed about your eligibility for BSN programs. I took 5 AP classes in high school and I entered a pre-licensure BSN program directly out of high school.
  10. by   angel0309
    It seems as if something was lost in communication somewhere. I took enough AP and dual enrollment in high school to the point that I started college as a sophomore and I have had no problems with getting into the programs of my choice. If anything, having these credits helped me because I didn't have to take any of the typical gen ed courses (English, math, music, etc), I only had to take my specific nursing prerequisites, like Anatomy and Physiology, Microbiology, and Health Calculations. I suggest you speak to your school guidance counselor or call the admissions office of a BSN program you may want to get into.
  11. by   WanderingWilder
    As a high school student I recommend going straight for the BSN, I don't understand why taking college level courses would disqualify you from doing so. If anything this should help you get into a college. Don't take the long way at your age, you have the time to focus on school and just get it done in the four years.
  12. by   hn7201
    Yes I do understand that... Although isn't BSN a university level program, I am taking all applied/college level courses in high school
  13. by   angel0309
    Quote from hn7201
    Yes I do understand that... Although isn't BSN a university level program, I am taking all applied/college level courses in high school
    Yes, a BSN is a university level program, so taking some college courses in high school will look very good on your application to that university. If you go on College Board's website, they have a tool that you can search for schools you may want to go to and find out exactly what AP classes they take and what class they transfer as. That way, you can compare the classes you take in high school to the college's gen Eds and pre requisites and see how much of a "head start" you get at each school you may want to go to. A school guidance counsellor should be able to help you with this as well.
  14. by   KelRN215
    Quote from hn7201
    Yes I do understand that... Although isn't BSN a university level program, I am taking all applied/college level courses in high school
    You still have yet to explain why you think this renders you ineligible to apply for a BSN program. Traditional pre-licensure 4 year BSN programs are meant for students entering out of high school. The requirements for high school courses for my BSN program were the same as the requirements for any applicant to any major in the university- a certain number of courses in English, Math, Science, History and Foreign Language as well as either SAT or ACT and SAT 2.

    If you go the LPN route, you'll be back here in 2 years saying you can't find a job as an LPN and therefore can't afford the bridge program you want to complete for your RN. In your situation, it makes the most sense to go the 4 year BSN route.

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