How many hours did you study A&P and what grade did you get? - page 3

I start A&P in the fall and I was curious about how many hours you typically spent studying and what grade you got. I know everyone is different but I am just wanting the average. Thanks.... Read More

  1. by   choc0late
    JS408- I LMAO when I read your post! That is so true! I also got an A on A&P 2, and lived,breathed and slept it! I'm taking A&P 1 now over the summer and dream of bone and process names, lol! Yeah, I got an A by ignoring my hubby, kids, housework, phone calls, etc! Yup! Was it worth it? Oh yeah!
  2. by   CrunchyMama
    Quote from choc0late
    JS408- I LMAO when I read your post! That is so true! I also got an A on A&P 2, and lived,breathed and slept it! I'm taking A&P 1 now over the summer and dream of bone and process names, lol! Yeah, I got an A by ignoring my hubby, kids, housework, phone calls, etc! Yup! Was it worth it? Oh yeah!
    Your school allows you to take A&P2 first? I mean, obviously if you're doing it, lol...but that's weird, never heard of that being done.
  3. by   S.vincent
    I studied as much as I could maybe over 6 hrs a day ( 3 hrs before and 3 hrs after the class) I got A+ in A&P I and II. I studied until I could give a speech to myself. Good luck!!
  4. by   Christina08
    I really started to study for AP tests only several days to the due. I passed both AP with A's. I saw some people write some notes and do audio recording, but they still ended up with B's or lower.
    However, I really do not recommend to study just several days before the test day. It is a bad habit and everything in a hurry.

    I wanted to add that with AP2 I also took 3 more classes (microbiology, abnormal psychology, and religion as one of humanities).
  5. by   ZAR963
    I studied probably about 10 hrs a week. My college has one of the hardest science department in the country and I had the hardest Anatomy instructer at my school. The class started out with 50 people and ended up with 18, half of which were not passing. There was 1 A. I got a C, and I count myself lucky because I was also doing a 20hr a week CNA program, going to school full time, and working on 2 plays. I was very upset with my grade though because I am normally an A student, but in the end it is one grade, and there is nothing you can do once the class is over but try really hard to do better in your other prereqs and not overload yourself with other classes and activities outside of your prereqs.

    Good luck
  6. by   NurseLoveJoy88
    I studied about 10-15 hours a week. I got an A in AP 2 and this was a fast track course which means what I learned in 8 weeks what would usually take a full semester.
  7. by   dcgrrl
    I averaged an hour to two hours per day except Saturdays. I studied closer to 2 hours per day when it was a few days before a test. I took class once a week on Saturdays from 9-3p (lab and lecture combined). Saturdays were my ABSOLUTE "day off" from studying. It worked for me--- I got an A. But as other posters have mentioned - - - it's not about quantity but quality. Find out what your studying style is (if you haven't done so) and be consistent w/ reviewing your notes. You may be like some of the ladies in my class who studied half as much as I did and still busted As. Just don't wait to the last minute.
  8. by   bluechick112
    I see that a bazillion people have already replied, but I figured i'd toss my two cents in as well.

    My school offers A&P as separate classes. So I took Anatomy first (it's a prerequisite to Physio so you have to do it in that order). I decided to take Anatomy as an accelerated, short-term class over the summer. It was 9 weeks and we went to class M-F 9am-3pm (but we'd always get out of class early). We had what was called "open lab" on Saturdays and Sundays, which were basically review days and were completely optional, and had two tests (lab & lecture) every Monday. I did open lab every Saturday morning and studied the ENTIRE weekend (non-stop, morning til night) for the tests on Mondays. Therefore, I was basically in school 7 days a week. We also had field trips like autopsies which were optional for extra credit. Not to mention the hours we'd put in on our own time doing dissections on our cadaver. But anyway, after basically throwing my life away and dedicating it to my Anatomy class that summer, I got a 97% A.

    Then the next semester (last fall) I took my Physio class. I had an EXCELLENT teacher. Our tests were probably about once every 3 weeks...we had lab tests once every three weeks and then lecture tests which fell on the week after lab tests (also spaced about every 3 weeks). I studied my little butt off for all lecture and lab tests. However, this class was spaced out since it was the length of a full semester instead of a short-term summer class, so there were weeks when I didn't have any studying to do. We were also required to write a 12 page essay and give a ppt presentation as well as do a lab report which ranged from about 8-12 pages. For the most part, I only had to study about 2-3 days before each test (if I crammed), so most of my time was free time. I ended up getting a 98% in the class. HOWEVER, it's important to note that this class was EXTREMELY hard. Really. I'm just a crammer, so I didn't spend as much time as everyone else did studying.

    I'd also note that flashcards are completely not worth it in these kinds of classes. I live by flash cards normally, but honestly just reading over lecture notes and reading the book a bazillion times is the best way to study. if you made flash cards you'd literally have a million and will probably miss vital pieces of information on them.

    GOODLUCK
  9. by   js408
    I used flash cards a lot during the first month of class to help me memorize terms like body regions and one-word definitions. After the first month the flash cards weren't helping

    Quote from bluechick112

    I'd also note that flashcards are completely not worth it in these kinds of classes. I live by flash cards normally, but honestly just reading over lecture notes and reading the book a bazillion times is the best way to study. if you made flash cards you'd literally have a million and will probably miss vital pieces of information on them.

    GOODLUCK
  10. by   BreatheFree
    Thanks for all of the replies.
  11. by   GaMBA
    I just finished A&P I and got an A. Besides the class lecture itself, I studied about a 1 to 1.5 hr or so per chapter for each test (each test covered 3 chpts). It was a 10-wk course and we had an exam every other week. It's pitiful to say this, but I only tended to study during the weeks we had class. I work fulltime and have a child and did what worked for me. I will say it was a tough class, definitely one of the tougher ones I've probably taken, simply because of all the stuff I had to learn in such a short time period. But I think what helped me was to see the big picture about how everything worked and came together. Plus, I had taken an Intro to A&P course back in the fall (when I was contemplating the LPN program) and some of the info came back to me this quarter when I studied. The best advice I can give is to find study habits that work for you. For me, I find I retain info best when I read and reread my notes and refer to the book for concepts I'm not all that clear on and for diagrams that bring everything together. I'm a very visual learner. We have a pretty good book for my class (Hole's Anatomy). Also, I would use activities on the book's website as a supplement to my study materials, using the End of Chapter Answers (which were like a really thorough study guide) and the labeling exercises. That helped a lot. The more I saw stuff, the better it stuck in my mind.
  12. by   ashcovert77
    I'm not sure what school you are attending, but at PCC they break up A &P into three consecutive classes. I just finished my second section and all I can say is be prepared!!! My professor advised us to study at least 35-40 hours outside of the classroom each week, and most people thought she was joking. However, I can vouch that it really does that much time to study and memorize everything. I got a B in my first section and an A in my second sections. However, half of my class in the first section failed due to lab class alone. Our lab tests consisted of 30 microscopes set up with slides and we were given just a blank sheet of paper, in which we had two minutes to recognize each type of tissue and spell them correctly. Seriously, be prepared it's like learning a new language.[FONT="Georgia"]
  13. by   LisaWantsBSN
    Quote from ashcovert77
    I'm not sure what school you are attending, but at PCC they break up A &P into three consecutive classes. I just finished my second section and all I can say is be prepared!!! My professor advised us to study at least 35-40 hours outside of the classroom each week, and most people thought she was joking. However, I can vouch that it really does that much time to study and memorize everything. I got a B in my first section and an A in my second sections. However, half of my class in the first section failed due to lab class alone. Our lab tests consisted of 30 microscopes set up with slides and we were given just a blank sheet of paper, in which we had two minutes to recognize each type of tissue and spell them correctly. Seriously, be prepared it's like learning a new language.
    We had that too in lab for a couple quizzes but for our lab practical exam we just had 4 dead bodies and pins sticking in their muscles and had to figure out what was what spell those correctly. It was hard because 92 year old dead women don't usually have very defined muscles. It would have been like learning a new language for me except that I took biomedical terminology for fun. It is neat to hear a word and be able to figure it out by the suffix, prefix, and root. I would suggest that class for anyone because it will help you in anatomy and physiology.

    Lisa

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