Double Major with Nursing / Nursing with Spanish Minor?

  1. Hello, I'm a High school junior who wants to do nursing in College. I have been reading that having another bachelors like Spanish/minor can increase your chances of being hired/higher raise? Now the question is would I be better of getting a minor or another Bachelors in Spanish? I have taken AP Spanish Language in HS which means I would start off with 14/17 credits depending the school I choose, and for a minor I would need to have 9/15 more credits depending on the school & for a bachelors it would be 29/24 more credits depending on the school.
  2. Visit Carlos03558 profile page

    About Carlos03558

    Joined: May '18; Posts: 7; Likes: 2
    from TX , US

    16 Comments

  3. by   Sour Lemon
    Quote from Carlos03558
    Hello, I'm a High school junior who wants to do nursing in College. I have been reading that having another bachelors like Spanish/minor can increase your chances of being hired/higher raise? Now the question is would I be better of getting a minor or another Bachelors in Spanish? I have taken AP Spanish Language in HS which means I would start off with 14/17 credits depending the school I choose, and for a minor I would need to have 9/15 more credits depending on the school & for a bachelors it would be 29/24 more credits depending on the school.
    I haven't heard of speaking Spanish resulting in higher wages. I suppose a second language could make you a more attractive candidate for a job, but on the other hand, places with high populations of Spanish speaking patients tend to naturally have high populations of Spanish speaking nurses. So you might be special, but not that special, if that makes sense.
  4. by   Carlos03558
    Interesting,I was just wondering if the need for a minor is needed to prove your fluent in another language?And to increase competitiveness
  5. by   Sour Lemon
    Quote from Carlos03558
    Interesting,I was just wondering if the need for a minor is needed to prove your fluent in another language?And to increase competitiveness
    I haven't observed that it makes much of a difference. I'm from south Texas and live in Southern California now. There were many Spanish speaking nurses in Texas and people in California speak all kinds of languages, some of which I'd never even heard of until I moved here. It's s plus, but not something I'd spend extra time or money on without a very specific goal in mind.
  6. by   Rose_Queen
    Quote from Carlos03558
    Interesting,I was just wondering if the need for a minor is needed to prove your fluent in another language?And to increase competitiveness
    Even if you were to minor in Spanish, that likely won't make you fluent and definitely isn't going to concentrate on healthcare Spanish. I minored in Spanish and I am definitely far from fluent and certainly not qualified to translate. Can I have a basic conversation related to do you have pain and other common phrases? Sure. But a patient history or patient teaching? Absolutely not.
  7. by   Carlos03558
    Im in San Antonio, and just interested to know if it mattered with the huge spanish population here
  8. by   Carlos03558
    I'am fluent in Spanish, but now that I think about it your probably right since they dont teach Spanish medical terminology.
  9. by   inthecosmos
    There have been a handful of job postings I've seen where being bilingual was a preference or requirement for nurses. Public health clinics may need that more than the hospital. Most organizations have invested in translating services and don't need their nurses to do it as well.
  10. by   verene
    Quote from Carlos03558
    I'am fluent in Spanish, but now that I think about it your probably right since they dont teach Spanish medical terminology.
    If you are fluent in Spanish now and want tot use it for work, then I would recommend looking to classes specifically for medical Spanish, and/or getting a medical interpreter's certificate rather than majoring/minoring in Spanish in college.
  11. by   Carlos03558
    Would that look better than a minor in Spanish?
  12. by   Carlos03558
    I looked it up at a local college here and this is what it says.

    HEALTH CARE SPANISH
    Designed to help in the development of practical
    Spanish communication skills for the health care
    employee. Topics covered will include medical
    terminology, greetings, common expressions,
    commands, and phrases normally used within a
    hospital or a physician's office. This course is open
    to healthcare employees and nursing students.
    (24 hours).
  13. by   Ruixi13
    Definitely no chance for a raise.. but it might make you more appealing and sound more interesting/more likely to get an interview. Perhaps certain urban centers with large immigrant populations speaking those languages may be more inclined to hire you if you truly are fluent, but if only a slightly proficient (minor) level language proficiency I'm not sure how much of an edge the degree would get you. That being said, I think language study is incredible and I have studied plenty and it has enriched my life so much, so would encourage it!!
  14. by   FolksBtrippin
    Quote from Carlos03558
    I'am fluent in Spanish, but now that I think about it your probably right since they dont teach Spanish medical terminology.
    Being fluent in Spanish will give you an edge. You don't need to major or minor in Spanish on top of that.

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