Associates or BSN???

  1. Hi Everyone, I need some advice. I am a prior college graduate with a BS in Communications, and am going back to school to become an RN. I have been accepted to both an Associates program and a BSN program. The Associates program is MUCH less expensive, and I would be able to complete it without any loans. Is it really worth it to go for the BSN? I do want to go on to get my masters in nursing, but would prefer to start working first. Any advice would be appreciated!
    Thanks!
  2. Visit chichi9 profile page

    About chichi9

    Joined: Feb '09; Posts: 17
    from US

    8 Comments

  3. by   PacoUSA
    I am in the same boat you are and I posed a similar question on another forum here some time ago. I've decided to pursue an accelerated BSN as it would be the shortest route towards my goals (RN and opportunity for a master's degree later on). An ADN in fact would take me longer to complete (2 academic years) than a BSN in accelerated mode (13 continuous months). Best bet is to look into an accelerated BSN program at a public state university as it would be comparably as inexpensive as the ADN. By pursuing your ADN first, you will still have to then pursue coursework to earn your BSN later. Many employers are also giving preference to nurses that have BSNs over ADNs, that's the trend in certain parts of the country.

    I understand your need to work as soon as possible (believe me I do), but there is also the additional hurdle of our economy and how questionable the purported nursing shortage is. There is no longer a guarantee of a job in many areas of the country, so in the long run I think the accelerated BSN is your best bet since you already have a BS.

    Good luck to you!
  4. by   js408
    If you want a masters then you need to get your BSN
  5. by   glamorousgirl07
    Ive spent so much time on this question......
    It comes down to time and money of course... The way i look at it is i already owe student loans for my first B.S. and instead making that debt even bigger ill go the Community college route and pay for my BSN out of pocket.....

    I would also look into a BSN/MSN bridge program

    Good Luck
  6. by   guiltysins
    If you want to get your Master's, you should go straight to your bachelor's because if you do Associate's first, you'd still have to go an extra two years for your bachelor's. Where if you get into an accelerated program, it will only take 2 1/2 to 3 years and you have to work before you can get a MSN anyway because most require experience. Plus unless you have all of your pre-reqs an associate's will take you about three years.
  7. by   mariposabella
    Go for the BSN if you want more job opportunities and if you want to pursue a graduate degree. It really depends on what your career goals are. Go for the ADN if finances are more of a concern. You can always apply for an accelerated RN TO BSN program later and find work at a hospital so you can get tuition reimbursement.
  8. by   MotivatedOne
    First I'd like to say that I wish I were in your predicament. Unfortunately I can't get accepted into an ADN or BSN program. Depending on what you want to do as soon as you graduate if it doesn't require a BSN degree I would go for the ADN program. Their are online RN-MSN degree programs out there. UNC-Chapel Hill a great school is one of the many in NC that offers that program. Even if you were to get your BSN because you plan to get your master's someday...You still have to have at least a year's experience as a nurse for most MSN programs. So regardless, you have to wait.

    Good luck with your decision!!!
  9. by   UVA Grad Nursing
    I would encourage you to go for the BSN now. Not only are job opportunities at many employers better for BSNs now (more and more Magnet hospitals are hiring BSNs as new graduates only), but it puts you further on the pathway for a MSN degree.

    Also, Advanced practice preparation (NP, CNS, CRNA, CNM) may be changing in the next few years requiring the Doctor of Nursing Practice as the entry into practice. There are BSN-DNP programs, but I am not aware of any Associate Degree - Doctorate programs. So depending on what type of advanced nursing degree you are seeking, you may have to get a BSN anyways.
  10. by   tiffini24
    Quote from chichi9
    Hi Everyone, I need some advice. I am a prior college graduate with a BS in Communications, and am going back to school to become an RN. I have been accepted to both an Associates program and a BSN program. The Associates program is MUCH less expensive, and I would be able to complete it without any loans. Is it really worth it to go for the BSN? I do want to go on to get my masters in nursing, but would prefer to start working first. Any advice would be appreciated!
    Thanks!
    I have both in my family an Associates degree and a BSN. I was told that the difference is .50cents to a 1.00. Especially with there now being a nursing shortage you have to decide which is best for you. Do you have family, mortgage, etc. Are you willing to start out repaying debt.

    I personally would if I was single without a family would go the associates route and bridge right away to the bachelors in order to eventually obtain the masters. This way after obtaining the associates you can get started working and I believe that most hospitals help pay for you to further your education and you cut down the amount of debt you start out with. These excelerated programs are cool but they can be pretty expensive I guess because they are excelerated.


    Let me know what you decide and the best of luck!


    Tiffini

close