accredited vs. unaccredited

  1. okay I have heard that if you go to a school that is unaccredited then you will not be able to sit for the NCLEX. however I know a nurse at my local hospital that went to an unaccredited school, took the test and got a job. If you go to a school that is not accredited does that mean you can only work in the state you got your license??? i am so confused!! can anyone help me out??? thanks!!!
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  2. Visit 3KittiesRN profile page

    About 3KittiesRN

    Joined: Sep '04; Posts: 111; Likes: 16
    Registered Nurse
    Specialty: 8 year(s) of experience in Medical/Surgical, L&D, Postpartum

    13 Comments

  3. by   NurseLatteDNP
    Most of the hospitals here in north Texas will not hire a nurse that went to a unaccredited school. Your state may be different. I know that because my dear friend has to work in south Oklahoma with a 2 hour drive, because she graduated from an unaccredited school and no hospital here wanted to hire her.
  4. by   KatieBell
    Yes, agree with the above poster. Una ccredited schools do not have to have the same standards that accedited schools have, and may cut corners on important things like clinical hours etc...
  5. by   sjt9721
    Quote from kiyatylese
    Most of the hospitals here in north Texas will not hire a nurse that went to a unaccredited school. Your state may be different. I know that because my dear friend has to work in south Oklahoma with a 2 hour drive, because she graduated from an unaccredited school and no hospital here wanted to hire her.
    I'm curious...where did she go to school?
  6. by   NurseLatteDNP
    Quote from sjt9721
    I'm curious...where did she go to school?
    She has moved here from south Texas, so I know that she went to school in that area. I am really not sure where exactly, but I will find out.
  7. by   VeryPlainJane
    I always wonder about those schools...did they at one time lose their accredition..or never bothered to get it? Must unaccredited school cost out the wazzu, and they don't get FAFSA loans or grants. Who would want to chance it?
  8. by   Daytonite
    The safest thing to do is check the website of the Board of Nursing for the state in which you live for their list of approved nursing programs. Anyone attending one of those approved nursing programs can take the NCLEX exam upon completion of their program of study. Accreditation is something you have to check with each individual nursing school about. In general, the nursing programs in most colleges are accredited, but that is only a generalization.

    You are in the bay area? Is that, like, up around San Francisco? If you are in California you can find the list of approved schools very easily on the web site of the California Board of Nursing for both RN and LVN schools.
  9. by   3KittiesRN
    I didnt even think to look on the California Board of Nursing website!! Thanks Daytonite!! I have mostly been using the website allnursingschools.com and that website shows all the schools that are NLANC accredited. I looked on the California Board of Nursing website and found out I can apply to many other schools in my area!!! So next fall I am applying to 6 ADN programs in my area and hope that I at least get into one of them!!!
  10. by   Jessy_RN
    The major problem is the possibility of not being able to transfer credits if you ever want to further your education. It's better to play it safe and go the accredited route.
  11. by   Daytonite
    Well, you go girl! You will also find that all the California community colleges have websites where you can find more specific information about their nursing programs. Good luck!

    The California community colleges, Cal State colleges and University of California colleges have been working to standardize the classes needed to go from your ADN to RN. If that is one of your desires, the counselors at the community colleges that have nursing programs will be able to tell you about this bridging.
    Last edit by Daytonite on Dec 5, '05
  12. by   rhp123
    I know a school that lost their accreditation. They are certified by the state board so no problem for geting license in any state in the US.

    The only problems are:
    1) graduates cannot work in VA hospitals or any hospital that ask for accrediateted RN graudates.

    2) Lots of BSN / MSN programs require RNs to graduate from accreditated schools.

    However, there are ways around, if one graduate from an accreditated ADN program, he/she can go to a accreditate RN-BSN program, and it will be easy to find such a program and get in. After getting the BSN, one can apply for any MSN programs or work at any hospital.
  13. by   KatieBell
    You know, I've applied for many jobs (traveler) and for many nursing licenses. While I am sure there are hospitals that do not require graduation from an accredited program, I've never applied for a job that did not require graduation from an accredited nursing program. Each time I have applied for a license in a new state they also ask if my program was accredited...

    I really would only go with the ones that are accredited, I know its tough to get in and wait lists are long, but the accreditation should theoretically ensure that you are getting a comparable education. Reality shows this isn't always true, but at least with accreditation, some sort of basic standards have been officially demonstrated...
  14. by   VeryPlainJane
    Quote from rhp123
    I know a school that lost their accreditation. They are certified by the state board so no problem for geting license in any state in the US.

    The only problems are:
    1) graduates cannot work in VA hospitals or any hospital that ask for accrediateted RN graudates.

    2) Lots of BSN / MSN programs require RNs to graduate from accreditated schools.

    However, there are ways around, if one graduate from an accreditated ADN program, he/she can go to a accreditate RN-BSN program, and it will be easy to find such a program and get in. After getting the BSN, one can apply for any MSN programs or work at any hospital.
    In my city we have something like that for ADN's it's a BSN/MSN you work on both at the same time. Many people are going that route.

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