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PRC negotiating mutual recognition deal for RP professionals

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August 29th, 2008 PRC negotiating mutual recognition deal for RP professionals MANILA - Officials of the Professional Regulation Commission (PRC) said Friday the Philippine government was negotiating with other countries for mutual recognition arrangements for engineers, architects, nurses and accountants.

“We have to be open to these negotiations for the exchange of knowledge and experience between our professionals and the those from other countries,” PRC Commissioner Ruth Padilla said in a press briefing. Padilla said the government was working out these arrangements with Australia, New Zealand and Canada.

“There are plenty of offers from other countries, but we have to be careful in making agreements because we have to protect our professionals,” Padilla added. On Monday, Southeast Asian economic ministers signed agreements allowing accountants, dentists and doctors to work in each other's countries. The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) has already signed similar arrangements covering architects, surveyors, engineers and nurses. Under the pacts, ASEAN states will mutually recognize qualifications and standards covering these professionals so they can practice in any ASEAN country. The accords will also ensure that professional standards in an ASEAN state are maintained, monitored and regulated. The measures to facilitate movement of professionals within the region are part of ASEAN’s efforts toward economic integration, which include easing the flow of goods and services as well as investments.

In December 2006, ASEAN economic ministers signed a mutual recognition agreement for nurses. The signing of the agreement was expected to pave the way for the deployment of more Filipino nurses in the region. (inquirer.net)

http://www.asianjournal.com/?c=186&a=29704

gemini_star, BSN, RN

Specializes in Oncology, Medical. Has 2 years experience.

This is good news! However, it failed to mention how many years of experience is required in order to work in any ASEAN country. I think they will still require 2 years of experience.

i think the 2 years is the usual minimum of requirments. goodluck for this goodnews.

This still does not change things for anyone, the same requirements that have been in effect for the countries that will employ RNs from other countries is still in effect.

Thailand requires that one pass their language exam as well as the Thai nursing exam in Thai. Japan does not even grant a license to Japanese nationals that trained in another country, so they are not going to issue a license to someone from the Philippines.

Singapore has a requirement of two years of experience. Australia and NZ both have specific requirements.

Malaysia also has their own requirements.

These requirements are not going to be changing. And these are the same requirements that have been in place for members of other ASEAN countries as well, and all along.

gemini_star, BSN, RN

Specializes in Oncology, Medical. Has 2 years experience.

Thanks Suzanne! That is what I am thinking also that the set of requirements to practice in a Southeast Asian country will still be in place despite of the agreement.

This is a small step towards full ASEAN integration. Their will be hiccups along the way for sure and it will be a long and an arduous process.

For those unaware, the countries comprising ASEAN are trying to duplicate the European Union model to be able to compete globally. The end goal is for ASEAN to be like EU and they are trying to fast track this at the soonest possible time because of the emergence of China and of course the EU.

Thailand requires that one pass their language exam as well as the Thai nursing exam in Thai. Japan does not even grant a license to Japanese nationals that trained in another country, so they are not going to issue a license to someone from the Philippines.

Singapore has a requirement of two years of experience. Australia and NZ both have specific requirements.

Malaysia also has their own requirements.

it seems that you very against flipino just let it be its our goverment effort just stick to your own regarding US imigartion as it claim your the expert on that. i believe our goverment are doing there best to have ASEAN members to alow its nationlity to work with other members too. please jsut let it be.

These requirements are not going to be changing. And these are the same requirements that have been in place for members of other ASEAN countries as well, and all along.

your always agains what filipinos are doing, its just they have starting negotiating as if your the one making the negotiating as respect suzane jsut let it be with respect to us. then react after the final negotiation. thank you

who knows after this asean discussion regarding th profesionals would be transparent,and allow like nurses to be on preceptor for training in the new facilities. the prblem with you there was no final determination as if you will be the one to decide just let it be. i realy observe your really against.

I have never been against Filipinos doing anything, but I do have issues when your government signs contracts for a four year BSN to go and work as a care-giver or maid in another country. That is what their agreements are for that they have signed but yet everyone states that this is the way that is needs to be and it does not.

The Philippines will not accept a foreign national that actually went to school in the Philippines to get licensed there first of all. Even an American if they attend there, cannot get licensed there to work as an RN there, nor if they are from any other country as well. Only if they are dual citizens or hold only a passport from the Philippines can they get licensed there.

So why should other countries have to accept graduates from there if your country will not accept them?

This is the point that I am trying to make, and if I did not like nurses from your country, why in the world would I help them pass exams or get jobs in other countries? That makes no sense to me at all.

All I did was list the requirements of other countries for licensure, and those requirements would need to be met; same as they are required now.

No country has unlimited visas for nurses, never has and never will. Your country will have to open its doors to others first, before they can expect to have the same rights in other countries as well. Nothing is ever one-sided.

Things always need to start at home first, changes need to be made first to the requirements for your country before they can expect others to want to agree to anything.

Instead of recognition, why don't they just do a mutual benefit and a same salary scheme or something. They should think of a way to make the nurses stay...

The Philippines has found a way to keep nurses here. They have put into law the minimum salary that nurses who work for the public govt are to be paid of no less than salary grade 15. Which is around 16,000 pesos/month. This is a decent wage for a new nurse.

RA 9173: Sec. 32. Salary.-In order to enhance the general welfare, commitment to service and professionalism of nurses, the minimum base pay of nurses working in the public health institutions shall not be lower than salary grade 15 prescribed under Republic Act No. 6758

The problem is they don't enforce it. :banghead:

So how in the world can your country make demands on others to do things when they do not and cannot enforce rules that they have in place.

Until they open their doors for licensure for nurses from other countries, that even trained in the Philippines and are unable to get licensed there, how in the world can they expect other countries that are in ASEAN to just accept nurses from PI with no questions asked?

Sorry, but does not work that way.

i reiterate my stance on those people holding a position in the Philippine government.. they are idiots! Making laws that they could not possibly enforce. Its like building a chair for burning. Its all bs especially now that the election is close by then again everybody is trying to be very hard to earn everybody's trust.

thats why there negotiating to discuss ways and means.

Greetings everybody!

It just seems to me Ms. Suzanne, that the reason why we don't have a reciprocity for foreign graduates to be licensed in our country is because there is actually no one that I know of who would rather work here. Why would they? The equivalent of $300 a MONTH is not exactly attractive (My brother who is a US nurse earns more than that in a day). Even for my colleagues in the Philippines, and even for that amount, there are still no jobs to be had. It doesn't make any sense for ANY foreign nurse to even want to be licensed and work in the Philippines. My country has always been there for America, and if American nurses would want to be licensed and actually work in my country, Im sure the Philippine government would be more than willing to oblige. It just wouldn't make sense at all......

oneproudigorot, MSN, RN

Specializes in ICU, Coronary ward. Has 11 years experience.

that's good news... it's a challenge to filipino nurses to excel more in both the clinical and theoretical aspect of nursing...

pass those exams just like eating cake... lol

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