So fed up:( Could use some help:( - page 2

Hi All:) I'm actually not a new poster, I've posted before but not for a while and cannot remember my old log in name so here I am again:) Anyway, I just really need some words of... Read More

  1. by   nursingis4me
    Dear nickelbee,
    Could you PLEASE tell us what is the name of this hospital (& where it is located) that puts lives in jeaporady? I want to make sure neither myself, my family, or my friends EVER go there-and if anyone I know has a PCP or specialist affliated this disgrace of a hospital, they change docs QUICK!!!!

    NURSINGIS4ME
  2. by   augigi
    It would probably be easier to call your board of nursing. Regardless of no patient ratio, there must be some mechanism for nurses to refuse to care for too many patients, or else they could give you 100. I would make sure before I left that I wrote a letter to your employer detailing in writing the concerns regarding patient safety and copied it to the BON.
  3. by   gitterbug
    Dear Nickelbee,
    You would be abandoning patients, you work 12 hour shifts, so you are picking up, not getting rid of patients. I know how overworked and stressful a situation like this one is. The only thing you can do is report unsafe working conditions to the DON, PBON, and other agencies involved.

    You have been fed a line of crap regarding the doctors c/o poor skin care and lack of RN involvement. I have never seen a doctor c/o this in over 25 years unless bugs are actually crawling on patients. I think your DON has decided to institute a new "Primary Nurse Care" role for RN's at your institution, she did not think the whole thing through. I have gone through this same thing 3 times, tell those CNA's that their jobs will be cut next, they cannot justify being on staff, earning a salary, and not doing productive tasks. The sad part of this whole mess is, patients lose by not getting care they need, nurses become too stressed and overworked and quit, and the institution has a big slide in reputation. After a while, someone in administration will be confronted by an angry family, law suit will start to fly, and heads will role.

    Do yourself a favor, look for a new position, hopefully one in a new area of nursing, a unit, a clinic, a office, for the Red Cross, or state. Never forget this experience. Never forget to always work where there are "real" CNA's.
    When you hand in your notice, smile, do not discuss your reasons, just say a change was necessary for health reasons. You are not required to explain further. Your health will surely suffer if you stay at this job.

    Good luck, let us know how all of this turns out.
  4. by   RNfromMN
    Utter insanity...I mean, that's just NUTS ! Nice CNAs - they just sit and watch?!? Have they heard of "work ethics?" I suppose they think they've "earned" this nice paid vacation, or something. I've worked with nurses that I didn't particularly cared for, nor did I respect, but I always gave them a hand when they needed it. Why? Not only because it's my job (hello!), but because I cared about my pts.

    I get (& respect:bowingpur ) that you're not a quitter, & it's very sad that ultimately it's the pts that are going to suffer, but you've gotta think about your license - which it sounds like you've done. You're not going to be able to advocate for anyone if that gets taken away. I know you were looking for support with your post, so forgive me, but I gotta say, it's stories like this that make me terrified of my impending graduation.

    Good luck - please keep us posted
  5. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    (((((Nikelbee)))))))

    No, it is not pt abandonment if you have not taken report and accepted the assignment. Congrats to you for looking elsewhere for a job and for speaking up about the situation at that hospital.
    I was worked in a med/surg unit where I got up to 13 pts by myself- no cnas, no unit clerk. I very nearly had a nervous breakdown and should have quit long before i did.
    I salute you for speaking up. This helps nurses and pts everywhere.

    Here's an old thread here re: abandonment laws.


    https://allnurses.com/forums/f8/fyi-...fing-1857.html
    Last edit by Hellllllo Nurse on Dec 2, '06
  6. by   adamsmom
    Not all CNA's are like that in fact i know a few nurses who are too good to answer bells when all they are doing at the time is sitting and talking about going to a bar. I work night shift and we only have 3 NA's at nite to cover about 70 beds. One nite the one NA got sick the nurse got worried and called and ambulance. As we were only 2 we did rounds did some of there treatments and answered bells while they sat and joked around. I was so upset I was going to talk to the DON but what would that do. It just shows me what kind of nurse I will not be. Any one of those bells could have been a fall or something urgent.
  7. by   NRSKarenRN
    everyone talking amongst themselves, but not will to take a stand is what i perceive as keeping nursing back from advancing as true professional in driver seat of workplace issues. written feedback to management is important to document unsafe staffing issues using professional objective data.

    it's due to issues such as this that nursing unions often enter a workplace.... and why pasnap as a nursing union is growing in pa.

    great tool to help nurses find a a voice is book: from silence to voice : a must read for every nurse.
    it has certainly help me find my voice.
  8. by   gitterbug
    Once again something was missed on this board. This nurse was finishing the last 4 hours of a 12 hour shift, she already had a patient assignment, she was picking up patients, in no way did she say she was changing assignments, This nurse had a right to refuse more patients but she could not leave the patients she had been assigned to for the previous 8 hours. This nurse did not indiciate she gave report to any other nurse on her previous patients. There was no one to give report, so how in blazes could she not be abandoning patients?
    Sometimes I think I practice on another planet, in a weird facility, that has a door marked "problems" that only my work mates and myself see. I applaud this nurse in attempting to get the help and staffing she needed, I hope she looks for and finds another job with better conditions, but if she would have left she would have abandoned patients. Her license would have been in trouble. Someone, please explain this to me if I have the problem wrong.
  9. by   miracle1986
    Turn the hospital in to any agency you can possibly find. It will be shut down. Restraints are illegal in any state.
    If you are not in charge of the whole facility....it is not abandonment. But, I would quit immediately- that is if I were to walk out. In fact, I worked skilled nursing..... Ready for this? On afternoons, I had 32 patients and 2 aids. On midnights, I had only 1 aid with the 32 patients. ALL skilled nursing, not personal care. When the union was voted in and mandation began -- I started getting mandated....On my mandated overtime, I then had 2 halls (64 patients) and 2 aids. I lasted 2 days. If I ever had 10 patients I would jump for joy.
  10. by   miracle1986
    Unless you are the supervisor in charge of the entire hospital / facility it is not considered abandonment. But, it is a good idea to quit if you are just plain walking out. Into my mandated third shift after and afternoon shift I had previously worked ---I was given 2 halls, 64 patients and 2 aids...I nearly ended up in the E.R. I quit at 4 a.m. with a blood pressure of 160 / 110. never had blood pressure issues before that night. But it nearly killed me to do the work. I was RUNNING to the rooms with no shoes on, my feet hurt so bad. (A dead nurse is of no use to patients). And honestly--it nearly killed me that night. I have been a nurse since 1980. No write ups or med errors ever. And I still have my license. I turned the facility into the state. It is on probation to date.
  11. by   RN BSN 2009
    That is awful! NOBODY should have to put up with that treatment!
  12. by   CarVsTree
    Quote from gitterbug
    Once again something was missed on this board. This nurse was finishing the last 4 hours of a 12 hour shift, she already had a patient assignment, she was picking up patients, in no way did she say she was changing assignments, This nurse had a right to refuse more patients but she could not leave the patients she had been assigned to for the previous 8 hours.

    Actually, this board didn't miss it, you did :smilecoffeecup:

    You would have not been abandoning your patients by refusing additional patients. Just continue to care for the ones you have and refuse additional.
    See my post on the 2nd page of this thread.
    Last edit by CarVsTree on Dec 12, '06
  13. by   CarVsTree
    Quote from miracle1986
    Unless you are the supervisor in charge of the entire hospital / facility it is not considered abandonment. But, it is a good idea to quit if you are just plain walking out. Into my mandated third shift after and afternoon shift I had previously worked ---I was given 2 halls, 64 patients and 2 aids...I nearly ended up in the E.R. I quit at 4 a.m. with a blood pressure of 160 / 110. never had blood pressure issues before that night. But it nearly killed me to do the work. I was RUNNING to the rooms with no shoes on, my feet hurt so bad. (A dead nurse is of no use to patients). And honestly--it nearly killed me that night. I have been a nurse since 1980. No write ups or med errors ever. And I still have my license. I turned the facility into the state. It is on probation to date.
    Wow! How awful....

    For clarification, you are right that only the facility can be held responsible after the following, per the PA State Board of nursing.

    (b) A registered nurse may not:

    (6) Leave a nursing assignment prior to the proper reporting and notification to the appropriate department head or personnel of such an action.

    (7) Knowingly abandon a patient in need of nursing care. Abandonment is defined as the intentional deserting of a patient for whom the nurse is responsible.


    049 Pa. Code §21.18.Standards of nursing conduct.

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