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Out to a stressful start.

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I graduated LPN school not long ago, and had a much more difficult time finding a job than I expected with the nursing shortage. People seem to want RNs.

I eventually found myself out of money and desperate. I found an add for correctional nursing. They were as desperate as I was, and offered a good sign on bonus. I took it. I had never thought of working in a prison, but once I applied, I became excited about it. I am proud of being able to handle the most difficult patients that no one else can (or wants to). They more I learned about it, the more excited I became.

I have now been there almost two months, and I am having a blast. I love all the opportunities for a new nurse, it's like working in a bunch of different settings at once. I didn't feel uncomfortable at all.

But management sucks. They do not have my back, they can barely keep it together. No one charts like they should, and throughout my orientation they have told me that there just is not enough time to do it right. I have not been thrown out there by myself yet, but I worry about my license.

I also worry about how it would look if I quit now. Would other employers think there is something wrong with me because I was unemployed for several months, and then quit my first job before I could start? Would that be reason enough to be passed by?

I know I am a great nurse (for a new grad). I had high scores. I have lots of experience as an aide. I have high standards. I wouldn't be quitting because I couldn't make it, I would be quitting because I think poor management in a prison could be a dangerous thing.

Any advice? Thanks.

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I have now been there almost two months, and I am having a blast. I love all the opportunities for a new nurse, it's like working in a bunch of different settings at once. I didn't feel uncomfortable at all.

But management sucks. They do not have my back, they can barely keep it together. No one charts like they should, and throughout my orientation they have told me that there just is not enough time to do it right. I have not been thrown out there by myself yet, but I worry about my license.

I also worry about how it would look if I quit now.

If you're having a blast, TUF, love the opportunities, then enjoy the ride.

I believe management sucks just about everywhere, and they really suck at the government level.

If you are acting as a prudent nurse, following doctor's orders and documenting, don't worry about your license.

As an LPN, I quit my first job after about two months and have worked steadily for 35 years. I even quit once during orientation as an RN about 28 years ago.

The best to you, TIF!

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Yeah... if you are having a blast, you have more than won half the battle. :)

I worked in a psychiatric facility for a year that was quite disorganized, yet

I loved the work and the patients and I thrived there. I had to leave there

because of the schedule and the driving distance. But, like Davey Do said,

unfortunately many facilities aren't managed all that well. Do your job the

best you can, follow orders, assess your patients... document... you'll be

fine.

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I think the most important part is do YOU have time to document correctly? You will find nurses who don't in any place you work. If you feel good about the safety of what you're doing, I'd try to stick it out a year.

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Thank you all.

I am trying my best to document correctly, but like I said, I haven't been thrown out by myself yet. The nurses I am with keep saying the days are slow and I am lucky. The days have seemed rather busy to me. I'm afraid that once I'm by myself, I'll find that they are right, and there isn't enough time.

I also just found out that they haven't been passing surveys - another red flag?

I read somewhere on here that in corrections, if they inmate sense a breakdown in they system and realize no one is working together, they take advantage of it. No one follows the system. No one does the same thing. Everyone does what they feel like.

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I also just found out that they haven't been passing surveys - another red flag?

I know next to nothing about the prison system, TUF, but I wonder this: Prisons are a necessary evil and are subject to surveys and investigations, so the whole process could be a formality. One hand scratching the other's back, so to speak.

I say this based on the fact that Wrongway regional Medical Center has achieved a "best in the state" status. I can't understand this when it's been involved in some heavy duty lawsuits that have received national attention, but it's been recognized by surveying entities?

It just don't fit.

Anyway, I do my job to a relatively high standard, patients receive adequate care, and I get a paycheck. That's all that matters to me.

In summary, I don't put too much stock in surveying entities.

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I know next to nothing about the prison system,

In summary, I don't put too much stock in surveying entities.

I have worked surveying many facility types, but never prisons. As far as I know, CMS does not have the authority to do so because of the issue of medicare/medicaid coverage. Good question. as far as I know they could survey themselves!

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I'm a bit confused about it myself. My first day, I was given a tour, taken to the med room, and shown how they were pre-popping. Speaking before thinking, I said "Is State okay with that?". The DON looked at me confused for a minute, then said "we're state.". I have sense been told that they do have someone come to do surveys, though, which they are not passing.

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I've worked in both a prison and a jail and what are describing is pretty typical. At least it's not a contract medical company. Those are even worse with staffing and admin. The prison didn't do prepopping but the jail did and they were told by state that they couldn't and they changed. I'm not sure if it varies by state with the prepopping. Because med passes are so extensive, people find prepopping more convenient but it is definitely not best practice. I would stick with it for now and at least get your year experience, especially if you are liking the actual job. It will make you a dang good nurse because are being exposed to almost every disease process, including mental illness and addiction. It definitely made me a better, well-rounded, confident nurse, and my bullcrap meter is always on alert. I was terrified at first because it was only down to me to make medical decisions for 700-2000 patients. The most important thing to remember is to not let the patients manipulate you. You want to read an article titled, "Downing a Duck." You can search it online. It is very insightful on how little manipulations can spiral. If you need any other insight or help, feel free to message me.

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I worked in a prison for four years, and I loved the job itself. Management sucked but that was OK because they left me alone. What made me quit is the caliber of fellow employees. We had nurses who were obvious druggies, incapacitated at work, stole meds, and nothing was done by nursing management. The nurse I worked closest with had huge mental health issues, texted to the DON that other nurse were trying to kill her by poisoning her food and nothing was done; same nurse stole personal property from me, caught on camera, nothing was done. The list goes on. I stayed as long as I did because I did love correctional nursing. I loved the autonomy. I loved that I heard "thank you ma'm, appreciate you ma'm" more from the inmates than I EVER heard from any of the patients and families I took care of in ICU. The surveyors come and go, but it's not you that's going to get in trouble if there's issues, it's management. As long as you do your job correctly, you're OK. As far as the inmates go, I'm sure you were given orientation by security as to how to deal with the inmates. As long as you're by the book, never make exceptions or play favorites, you'll be OK. If you like your job, I would stick with it. More and more nurses are miserable in their jobs especially in the hospital setting. Good luck.

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It sounds like you like your job, you learn a lot and you are happy over all, but you see potential issues. That's a keeper for now.

If you get miserable at some point it might be time to leave, but for now just keep on learning and growing the best you can.

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Thanks, you all have really good advice.

I am having a lot of fun, don't know if that will change. The only down side is how I miss being more personable like I could be with my nursing home residents.

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