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Nurses   (2,097 Views | 12 Replies)
by bunbao bunbao, BSN (New) New

bunbao has 4 years experience as a BSN and specializes in CVA.

908 Profile Views; 9 Posts

Hello, currently I'm working at a skilled nursing facility as a per diem. Today, I turn in my resignation letter because I don't think I'm fit for the job as a new grad (been there for about 6 weeks so far). The manager told me that it's too much paper work, so she'll just put me as not available on her schedule for work, and after 3 months the system will drop me.

She told me this does not mean that I get fired, it just means something like a separation between 2 parties (when I'm available for work, they don't need me and when they need me I'm not available).

I've never heard or seen anything like this happen, so please enlighten me. Thank you.

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klone has 14 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

6 Followers; 13,528 Posts; 118,433 Profile Views

Too much paperwork? That's ridiculous. Do you have an HR department?

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starmickey03 has 8 years experience as a MSN, RN.

619 Posts; 10,764 Profile Views

When has there ever been paperwork in order to resign? Sounds like she's up to no good. Maybe it looks bad in the company when there are too many resignations or something.

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Whispera is a MSN, RN and specializes in psych, addictions, hospice, education.

3,458 Posts; 28,462 Profile Views

Turn in you resignation letter to the HR department too, if you have one.

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107 Posts; 2,220 Profile Views

You can also ask to go prn (as needed). Is that what she means? If it's not then do NOT allow her to do this to you. It may interfere with future opportunities. Would be a good idea to get out the good ol' employee handbook.

The reason you are required to put in a notice ahead of time (whatever facility requirements are) is to be eligible for rehire.. should you ever want to return. Future employers will look at this. Someone is employed to do this paperwork. Go to HR. And if she keeps giving you the same story and refused to work with you it may be necessary to go up the chain of command.

I would talk to her again and just be sincere. Being prn you are asked to take shifts but you may refuse some shifts. For us the requirement was one shift every 6 weeks to STAY employed but every facility is different. Getting "dropped" does not look good on your resume. You don't want it to look like YOU decided to just stop showing up to work even though SHE is telling you you will just "fall off" the schedule and everything will be fine? Or that you weren't available when they needed you? Looks bad on you even if it's not your fault.

She is blowing you off. There is necessary paperwork for getting on AND off the job. You should definatley get to the bottom of this. I don't think she will lose sleep over how it may affect your career.

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107 Posts; 2,220 Profile Views

I would just hate for the to come back and bite you when you are trying to follow through as you are supposed to.

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107 Posts; 2,220 Profile Views

The hospital I worked out did have paperwork for when you leave the job. Some do and others may not.

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bunbao has 4 years experience as a BSN and specializes in CVA.

9 Posts; 908 Profile Views

Thanks everyone! I thought per diem means they call you when they need you (or at least that's what the DON/my manager told me), so it's the same as prn right? I have no schedule at all, I just come in for work when they call me, sometimes they need me right away and it was up to me to say yes or no. To be honest, I dont know if the DSD considered HR or not? When I got hired, I was doing the paper work with the DSD and the DON.

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TheCommuter has 14 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

4 Followers; 226 Articles; 27,607 Posts; 320,189 Profile Views

The manager told me that it's too much paper work, so she'll just put me as not available on her schedule for work, and after 3 months the system will drop me.
This is called 'auto-termination.' When a PRN/per diem nurse does not work his/her minimum number of shifts per pay period, the system automatically terminates their employment.

An auto-termination is neutral. It does not count as a negative mark against one's employment history since it is such a routine finding.

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bunbao has 4 years experience as a BSN and specializes in CVA.

9 Posts; 908 Profile Views

Thanks TheCommuter! This gives me peace of mind. The DON is really nice to me, so it's the least that I can do for her, just as long as it doesn't affect my future. But now, knowing that it will be neutral, I can live with that.

What would I put in future job application if they asked "the reason for leaving?" Is there like a specific term for it? Would I use "auto-termination?" Thanks.

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5 Followers; 37,448 Posts; 100,583 Profile Views

I think you would want a written record that you did, in fact, resign. Surprising, how the story can change once the ex-employee is out the door. You don't want this to come back at you when you seek another job.

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TheCommuter has 14 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

4 Followers; 226 Articles; 27,607 Posts; 320,189 Profile Views

What would I put in future job application if they asked "the reason for leaving?" Is there like a specific term for it? Would I use "auto-termination?" Thanks.
You can list a more general reason, such as 'scheduling conflict.'

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