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One in four RNs wants a new job

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chicookie has 8 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Peds Hem, Onc, Med/Surg.

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You are reading page 4 of One in four RNs wants a new job. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

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The thing is most people out there don't like their jobs. We can't all have perfect jobs, a perfect job is an oxymoron. It is a matter of what can you put up with.

The nice thing about nursing is that there is such a variety of jobs! Anything from Life Flight nurse to prisons to Dr office and insurance company jobs. You can specialize in peds, geriatrics, give allergy shots, teach. Nursing is not just one thing like teaching is. An English teacher can teach- she can teach in a big or small school or can tutor. That is pretty much it. We can work in a million different settings- ER, OR, Psych, LTC, ICU, floor nurse, specialty floor nurse, private duty, drug and alcohol, many others. Days, nights, weekends only, 12 hours, 10 hours, 8 hours. Hospice and Home Health if you like to be on the road. Travel nurse if you have the guts to try new things. You can work for an agency and try out all the local facilities. You can work for a pharmaceutical company and sell their products (I mean market their products LOL) to docs if you are a go-getter with style. All in all if you want to help people and work with health care you can find some niche in nursing.

I have worked in LTC, Ortho, telemetry, MR, Home health, hospice, school nursing, teaching, QI, Case Management. Did a little private duty in a hospital when I first graduated to supplement my pay.

LTC- ok. I like the elderly. A lot of regulations that are impossible to follow. Never enough help. The workers were a team though and I enjoyed their companionship. I just did this on a casual basis.

Private duty- hated it! Never again. Good pay- boring beyond belief. I felt trapped.

Ortho- stimulating! I learned a lot. Would have stayed but it was a miserable floor with lots of backbiting, turnover and misery.

Telemetry- I was put there after being promised oncology by the HR manager. I learned a lot, we were well staffed but I did not like the work at all. Got pulled to CCU and ER sometimes. Almost transferred to CCU but left.

MR- I was bored. The patients were great, the staff was great, the job was fun, but I thought I would lose my skills so I left.

School nursing- love the kids! Love the independence! But the work- impossible to keep up with the paperwork. The staff treats me poorly. I am utterly alone and lonely for other nurses to talk to.

Home health- my great love. Love the independence and you still use your skills. IVs, central lines, complex wounds, chest tubes. New things all the time. The government has ruined it by making it more paperwork than patient care. Hard to meet the regulations. Hate the on call.

Hospice- love it, but it can be draining. Dying, dying, dying. No one gets better. Lots of call-outs. I liked it when I had some home health and some hospice patients. Better balanced.

Case management- enjoyable yet stressful. A lot of financial pressure is on you. You can't just do what the patient needs anymore. You have to balance the finances of it. It can be stressful.

Teaching- I liked going to work every day. None of that dread you feel sometimes. Lots of time off- spring break, semester break, summer break. The students were fun but sometimes they seemed to just want to prove me wrong and argue with me. They did not seem to share my joy of learning and of nursing. They made me feel like they were just jumping through hoops so they could get a job and money! If I did anything they did not like they complained to my boss. Much bolder than in my day. It was stressful but the work itself was enjoyable. I don't want to teach again.

QI - not many job opportunities and I have found that employers have QI only in name to look good. They don't really want to improve because it costs money. I love doing QI projects, but finding the right employer is not easy. This is what I want to do with my career if I can ever find a job at a place that takes it seriously.

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lockheart678 has 3 years experience and specializes in OR.

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I love the type of job I have, but I absolutely hate the hospital I work at. The newer nurses at my hospital are seriously underpaid, but at the same time, it's not possible to find a job outside of nursing that pays the kind of money that we make. If it were, I'd run far away and never look back. Based on my experience, I would never recommend nursing to anyone. I don't think it's worth the trouble. If I had known this 5-6 years ago, I would have found a different major that has the potential to bring in decent money.

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gobiprincess specializes in Home Health.

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Haven't we all considered Beauty College?! I know I have.

But I love being a nurse. I went straight from nursing school to Home Health. Working a 12hr shift in a hospital didn't fit my personality. I love the freedom and flexibility. I'm also bossy, OCD, and a control freak (when you say it out loud it You're not in denial anymore)...with a sprinkle of love and compassion. I think people that have been taken care of by a nurse and see how hard we work is wonderful, but is not a reason to go to nursing school. I think it takes a little more than, "i love working with people." Because the first time a patient pees on you or the family has been letting their father sit in his own feces for 5 hours and they didn't change him because they knew the RN was coming (and after all, that's what we went to nursing school for....) or when you see a bipolar/borderline patient that thinks their house is infested with bugs and itches the entire visit, in turn making you start to believe there are bugs crawling on you......I would think twice about becoming a nurse. But one of the perks is getting that one loving patient that so appreciates you that, they tell you they Love You and give you a cup of coffee for the road and if you get 2 patients like that BONUS. Because the first time I realized that this was the job for me was when I was doing wound care on a Butt and thought to myself "I am up to my eyes in bum and I am completly unphased, *** is wrong with me!?"

I think I'm blending 2 different articles here in this post but anyhow.... I love my job but wish there was less paperwork.

Be Love, Nicole

(A.D.D. Alert: sorry if I posted in wrong forum)

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I have a job as a Nursing Supervisor in a Long term Care Facility. It's getting stressful because of the decrease in staff and the multiple tasks the Supervisors have to tackle. We dont have any autonomy at all to give input to help the company become successful.It seems like that the company is telling us to make the following choice:stay in this present job and put up with the abuse or find another job.My plan is to find a different nursing job that isnt so stressful and further my education to receive my Bachelor's Degree in Nursing to receive a certification in Parish Nursing.

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"While I respect you all that say that nursing isn't making you happy, and read into everything you all are saying, it prepares me to not only to find a job, but to find the right hospital as well; interview that hospital I go into and see what they have to offer ME! I will go in with a BSN, being a member of the honors society and not a stitch of experience working in healthcare. They will offer me this or that, but I will be better prepared to interview the hospital and see what kinds of things they will offer me to be the best nurse I can be. I will be sure to look for training and development opportunities, as well as asking other nurses at that hospital how happy they are with their employer".

Response to Purplcav:

It sounds like a well thought-out plan. One problem, everyone in my nursing school class was an honor student too when we started. No one is now. Nursing school is not like anything you have ever done before. Our class age range is 20-51. Educational backrounds range from rural high school diploma to MBA and everything in between.

Also, as soon as you start in your clinical experience, you will see the challenges facing people in the healthcare profession are complex, 3 dimensional and have no clear cut solutions.

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nerdtonurse? is a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU, Telemetry.

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I think we get burned out at a higher rate than other positions -- we're front line life and death in some settings, and boringly repetitive "Mr. Jones is here with DKA...AGAIN" in others. I've been a lot of different things in my life, and I think it would really help if hospitals encourages rotation between floors and units -- not only would that break up the cliques, but it would keep people learning and foster understanding about what's going on with the floor tells the ER, "No, I can't take them right this minute" or the ER's thinking, "If I don't get them to a bed then we have to redo X, Y, and Z."

The most dangerous nurse in the world is the one who thinks they know it all....so keep folks from getting hidebound.

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HA HA HA. All the nurses I know wish they were teachers.

I have done some teaching- at high school and college level. In some ways it is harder, but the working conditions- well there is no comparison. We have crappy benefits and get written up for calling off. We are abused by EVERYONE. No principal to have your back. We work all year long. No nice little spring breaks, few holidays off. Long hours- longer than teaching. Many places don't even let you have a lunch break- except on paper because it is the law.

But, we punch in and out for the most part and unless you are on call you are off. Teachers are never really free except when school is out. Meetings, inservices, taking work home, open house. A lot of behind the scenes things. Nursing is very different. No fancy retirement plans in nursing. We work until we are 70 quite often. We work very hard all our years. Sometimes nursing is rewarding. Sometimes it is just stressful. A mistake could cost a life, your job, your future. We get so tired. Be sure you want this before you give up that teaching license.

My opinion- I would rather be a nurse. Having done both I would still rather be a nurse. Maybe at the elementary level it is better but high school kids are tough! Give me a psych patient any day over a defiant teenager showing off to her friends. Sheesh. High school takes a tough person these days! Still if you are in it I hope you worked long enough to get some good years into the retirement system because nursing won't give you much to look forward to.

You're the first person to actually figure that out - our job as teachers does not end at the end of a shift or day of work. I would put in an additional 3-4 hours per night grading papers and planning lessons - and paperwork? Wow, what they have done to teaching, as well, with the paperwork is insane. And summers off are pretty much in the past as now you have to do so many in-services, certifications, workshops that you pay for and are mandatory. They don't even help you pay for them! Now our pay is going to be based on merit! Tell me something, who is going to want to work with remedial or low skills students if they will be judged on student performance? There is no plan to judge those teachers any differently than the rest. How can that be. I did teach skills kids, kids who were not english speakers, kids who were "emotionally handicapped," and had just been released from jail,....will those kids do as well on a standardized test as the "general" population? And my pay and advancement is based on that? I did teach them for many years and though really difficult, I felt it was a calling and have many good memories of those special kids that make it worth it. But, now I cannot literally afford to even do that :crying2:

Now money is not everything. Absolutely not! But, if I'm going to be put through hell, I would like the possibility of at least making a little bit more - and have the choice of where I go depending on what I study - I have a Masters degree in education and I got a whole $2,000 more per year for that with no hope of advancement. That doesn't even cover my student loans at all! So practicality is part of my decision.

And there are so many branches of nursing. I have always loved medicine, health etc. I originally began studying to be a pediatrician, but married, got pregnant, and couldn't afford it. So, at my age, like many others, I'm taking the risk and going back to school. I can only work hard and pray that not only will I make it through, but eventually find a job that at least satisfies parts of me, if not the whole of me. That's more than I had in teaching there at the end. I loved my early years as a teacher, and loved many a student later on (they still write and call me), but this country has been destroying the educational system and it's going to get a whole lot worse before there is even a chance of getting better. I know many people say it's the same in nursing, but I've already mentioned the important differences. And benefits? What benefits? Those benefits some people have mentioned are long since passed and existed many years ago - I know, I began teaching in the early 80's when there were benefits. That's in the past.

I thank everyone for sharing their thoughts and experiences - they give me a different perspective, open my eyes. Like I said, I can only do my best and try to find the niche that fits me, or at least close to it. I still have my teaching license for the next five years, so I am trying to keep a backup plan as many people here suggested. Who knows, maybe I will go into Nursing education :)

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Zombi RN has 6 years experience and specializes in thoracic ICU, ortho/neuro, med/surg.

122 Posts; 6,918 Profile Views

Have always been of the opinion nursing, especially at the bedside requires a sabbatical or retreat period every now and then.

Nurses need sometime to "declench" and step back to refuel and recharge themselves professionally. This period could be a year or so back in school, or just a few months away clearing one's head and or meeting with other nurses exchanging ideas and networking. It is so helpful to know one is not alone and see how other professionals cope and deal with the problems and situations you have.

This is so true! I really think that we can get worn down so easily, because bedside care is enormously straining -- physically, emotionally, psychologically. A sabbatical every now and then is an excellent idea. Just a few days off during the week is not enough, and over time I think it's easy to get burned out.

A co-worker and I were talking about this last night. She has had a run of awfully combative patients lately, and it's really starting to get to her. It's so easy to get burned out, and it doesn't take long!

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You're the first person to actually figure that out - our job as teachers does not end at the end of a shift or day of work. I would put in an additional 3-4 hours per night grading papers and planning lessons - and paperwork? Wow, what they have done to teaching, as well, with the paperwork is insane. And summers off are pretty much in the past as now you have to do so many in-services, certifications, workshops that you pay for and are mandatory. They don't even help you pay for them! Now our pay is going to be based on merit! Tell me something, who is going to want to work with remedial or low skills students if they will be judged on student performance? There is no plan to judge those teachers any differently than the rest. How can that be. I did teach skills kids, kids who were not english speakers, kids who were "emotionally handicapped," and had just been released from jail,....will those kids do as well on a standardized test as the "general" population? And my pay and advancement is based on that? I did teach them for many years and though really difficult, I felt it was a calling and have many good memories of those special kids that make it worth it. But, now I cannot literally afford to even do that :crying2:

Now money is not everything. Absolutely not! But, if I'm going to be put through hell, I would like the possibility of at least making a little bit more - and have the choice of where I go depending on what I study - I have a Masters degree in education and I got a whole $2,000 more per year for that with no hope of advancement. That doesn't even cover my student loans at all! So practicality is part of my decision.

And there are so many branches of nursing. I have always loved medicine, health etc. I originally began studying to be a pediatrician, but married, got pregnant, and couldn't afford it. So, at my age, like many others, I'm taking the risk and going back to school. I can only work hard and pray that not only will I make it through, but eventually find a job that at least satisfies parts of me, if not the whole of me. That's more than I had in teaching there at the end. I loved my early years as a teacher, and loved many a student later on (they still write and call me), but this country has been destroying the educational system and it's going to get a whole lot worse before there is even a chance of getting better. I know many people say it's the same in nursing, but I've already mentioned the important differences. And benefits? What benefits? Those benefits some people have mentioned are long since passed and existed many years ago - I know, I began teaching in the early 80's when there were benefits. That's in the past.

I thank everyone for sharing their thoughts and experiences - they give me a different perspective, open my eyes. Like I said, I can only do my best and try to find the niche that fits me, or at least close to it. I still have my teaching license for the next five years, so I am trying to keep a backup plan as many people here suggested. Who knows, maybe I will go into Nursing education :)

I wish you luck. Nursing education may be a good fit. I know teaching is no picnic and the pressures on schools to perform (No child left alive LOL) are enormous. Testing, testing, testing, preparing for testing, pre-testing, review test results, meetings, training for testing, writing improvement plans for your low test scores, kids who HATE school and testing and do not care or try. OMG. Who has time for school? I am sure that it is a very stressful career these days. The whole thing is going to self-destruct. You are right on that- it cannot go on this way.

Still, I also know about the benefits and they are WAY better than most hospitals. Health care workers usually have crappy benefits and it is ironic that this is so. You will see what I mean soon enough. I am not trying to discourage you, like I said I would still rather be a nurse than teach. Those moments when it is me and my patient, I am teaching him something and he is truly interested, or I am helping him learn to give his insulin or change his colostomy bag, or I am relieving his pain, or just being there while he cries and tells me his fears and I calm him. Those are the moments that mean the world. Those are what make it all worthwhile. The patients don't know the behind the scenes stuff that we deal with. They don't need to know. They depend on us and it is a great feeling when you help someone or save someone. Beyond words.

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172 Posts; 1,682 Profile Views

I wish you luck. Nursing education may be a good fit. I know teaching is no picnic and the pressures on schools to perform (No child left alive LOL) are enormous. Testing, testing, testing, preparing for testing, pre-testing, review test results, meetings, training for testing, writing improvement plans for your low test scores, kids who HATE school and testing and do not care or try. OMG. Who has time for school? I am sure that it is a very stressful career these days. The whole thing is going to self-destruct. You are right on that- it cannot go on this way.

Still, I also know about the benefits and they are WAY better than most hospitals. Health care workers usually have crappy benefits and it is ironic that this is so. You will see what I mean soon enough. I am not trying to discourage you, like I said I would still rather be a nurse than teach. Those moments when it is me and my patient, I am teaching him something and he is truly interested, or I am helping him learn to give his insulin or change his colostomy bag, or I am relieving his pain, or just being there while he cries and tells me his fears and I calm him. Those are the moments that mean the world. Those are what make it all worthwhile. The patients don't know the behind the scenes stuff that we deal with. They don't need to know. They depend on us and it is a great feeling when you help someone or save someone. Beyond words.

Yes, those are the moments that make it worthwhile. Those are the moments that I look forward to. Do you at least have medical coverage?

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3 Articles; 915 Posts; 13,645 Profile Views

Yes, those are the moments that make it worthwhile. Those are the moments that I look forward to. Do you at least have medical coverage?

It varies but full-timers normally have medical, sometimes dental and eye coverage. Sometimes there are huge deductibles and co-pays, or you have to use your own hospital for complete coverage. Often they are PPO plans (preferred provider) or sometimes an HMO. You can sometimes choose various coverages depending on your own needs. You often pay a premium out of pocket. Most hospitals have PTO days that you cannot save. Some still have traditional sick time, but that is kind of out of vogue now. Some offer tuition reimbursement- not so many anymore. A lot depends on where you work. Usually they offer a 401K or 403B plan- you pay into it- they may or may not contribute. There are worse places as far as benefits, but in general it is a lot more out of your own pocket for much less coverage than teachers usually have.

Forgot vacation- usually two weeks to start if you have a traditional plan -sick, vacation, personal day(s).

I have worked for four hospitals in my career.

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nerdtonurse? is a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU, Telemetry.

3 Articles; 2,043 Posts; 32,115 Profile Views

Then again, the 1 nurse in 4 looking for a new job may be looking because of the other 3 nurses....

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