JCAHO and bedside medications...

  1. We recently received notification from our manager that all bedside meds needed to be kept locked up. This includes the Tucks pads, Dermoplast, lanolin ointment and All Purpose Nipple Ointment. So now our new mom's have to call us for every trip to the bathroom and anytime they need to apply ointment. It seems very taxing on nursing staffs time. Anyone else facing these issues and how do you cope? I can understand the Tucks and Dermaplast, but the ointments on a postpartum floor really seems to be pushing it.

    ETA: Darn...I do know its JCAHO...transposed the letters...sorry!!
    Last edit by RN*mommy on Apr 17, '09
  2. Visit RN*mommy profile page

    About RN*mommy

    Joined: Apr '08; Posts: 143; Likes: 78

    33 Comments

  3. by   Whispera
    I'd be racing to the cabinet to get Tucks, squeezing them into a glass, because they are ever so refreshing to DRINK! Is my opinion clear?

  4. by   RN*mommy
    Crystal...thanks.
  5. by   CaLLaCoDe
    I think there is a positive advantage in keeping meds locked up that would otherwise be used for toothpaste.

    For example, I was working as a CNA when I had mistakenly washed the patient's dentures with what I supposed was toothpaste since it was with his belongings in his bedside drawer. Well, was I surprised when the registered nurse came into the room perplexed as to where his debridement cream was. "Why it was in this drawer earlier!" She insisted. I rushed into the restroom cleaned off the dentures with soap and water and handed her the "Crest." I hated this nurse for this, putting a patient at risk for her convenience. Profoundly scary practice!!!

    I also find it terribly stressful to spend minutes in a room hunting for things that come in tubes misplaced somewhere in a patient's room, usually under the bed LOL!! Why can't we be of equal understanding and keep all prescribed meds locked up as in Joint commissions standards of practice, it's common sense to me!!!

    Besides, this wise joint commission policy saves money IMHO.
    Last edit by CaLLaCoDe on Apr 19, '09
  6. by   TuTonka
    Yeah but have you ever been the shift coming on and the shift went off with the tube of med. in their pocket? Have you ever tried to get a tube of ointment on the night shift in a small hospital when the supervisor has 3 admits, and arrest, and pts on the floor and Dr.s calling to find out why something was not done? you see there are two sides to every story. Sometimes you can only do the best with what you have and pray it is enough.

    TuTonka
  7. by   TuTonka
    Actually RN*mommy it is good see that others hit the wrong key also...LOL There is still hope for me and typing LOL
  8. by   Soon2BNurse3
    You do know it's medications and not medUcations right?? I believe I saw another one of your posts w/ the same spelling error....
  9. by   ElvishDNP
    Let's cut spelling issues some slack, shall we?
  10. by   Soon2BNurse3
    Just trying to help really....not trying to be a smarta$$! I'd hate to be making spelling errors such as that one in the hospital......like I said, I thought I saw the same error in another post so thought she really might not know! You never know these days...
  11. by   TuTonka
    Quote from Soon2BNurse3
    Just trying to help really....not trying to be a smarta$$! I'd hate to be making spelling errors such as that one in the hospital......like I said, I thought I saw the same error in another post so thought she really might not know! You never know these days...

    Oh H#$L I make spelling errors all the time . I am not charting here so I do not worry about it. But I think it was nice of you to give her a heads up.
  12. by   RN*mommy
    LOL, I really do know how to spell, I swear!! I was trying to type with my little guy sleeping on me. One handed typing and I don't get along. I apologize for the meducations...silly "I" and "U" are too close on the keyboard. I should have proofed before hitting the magic post button. When I tried to go back it wouldn't let me edit the title. Lesson learned. LOL

    Thanks for the replies though. I know there are two sides to every story, I just feel bad for our mothers not even being able to have their lanolin bedside. Are your patient's good about asking for it? My biggest concern is the mom's who don't ask for it and suffer with painful nipples...I don't want to see the cascade effect being they shorten their time breastfeeding or give up entirely. I guess all I can do is encourage my mom's to call me when they need it.
  13. by   LauraLiz
    *I'd be the mom that doesn't ask for it*
    Actually...didn't have any ointment available when I had my son, my nipples were killing me, she did end up giving be a nipple shield though, thank god for that or I wouldn't have even made it out of the hospital still beastfeeding.
  14. by   McBx3
    Quote from LauraLiz
    I wouldn't have even made it out of the hospital still beastfeeding.
    Hahaha... sorry, but the typo on breastfeeding cracked me up because that is soooo how I would describe my first few days of breastfeeding both of my kids.. BEASTfeeding LMAO

close