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NYS Producing Record Numbers Of Nursing Degrees

ALBANY – The number of registered nurses graduating each year from New York colleges has more than doubled since the height of a nursing shortage in 2002, according to a new report.

The survey of in-state colleges by the University at Albany's Center for Health Workforce Studies showed the number of nursing graduations has increased in each of the past 13 years, from a low of 5,128 in 2002 to 11,141 last year.

From 2013 to 2014, the number of annual nursing graduations increased 6 percent, according to the report, which was released late last month.

Report: Nursing degrees on rise in NY=

Rose_Queen, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in OR, education. Has 15 years experience.

"What we've been seeing is the demand for nurses now may not be as great as supply of nurses, so the new-nurse job market is becoming very competitive."

Finally! Nursing is doing itself a great disservice by producing far more grads than available jobs. It's no wonder wages have stagnated and working conditions are worse. Instead of hospitals needing us, they've got a line of those who don't know any better waiting to take our places.

MunoRN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care. Has 10 years experience.

The lead in of the news story is a bit deceptive. NY state's nursing programs are not producing twice as many nurses as they were in 2002, what they survey found that the number of nurses graduating from nursing programs has doubled, but the report stated that the majority of these graduates are "BSN completers", who were already nurses before entering their program. In other words, if a state has 5000 nurses and then 1000 nurses graduate from nursing programs, if those were all "BSN completers" then you still have 5000 nurses, not 6000.

The lead in of the news story is a bit deceptive. NY state's nursing programs are not producing twice as many nurses as they were in 2002, what they survey found that the number of nurses graduating from nursing programs has doubled, but the report stated that the majority of these graduates are "BSN completers", who were already nurses before entering their program. In other words, if a state has 5000 nurses and then 1000 nurses graduate from nursing programs, if those were all "BSN completers" then you still have 5000 nurses, not 6000.

Unless one is reading both the article and report incorrectly completers are not a "majority" of BSN graduates.

(page 10) of the report states that 36% of all BSN graduates in NYS were completers and made up 19% of RNs for 2014. Those numbers were expected to increase by one percent in 2015.

http://chws.albany.edu/archive/uploads/2015/06/Nursing_Education_Trends_2005-2015.pdf

That would leave a bit under three-quarters of BSN graduates as "new" nurses.

Information contained in the report is very interesting and worth a read with a coffee or beverage of choice.

For instance in 2014 RN program directors reported "many job" openings for new grads in nursing homes, ambulatory care and home health respectively. Hospitals OTOH reached only around 37%.

One assumes this varies by region but it does echo what is being said over in the NYS forum; hospital jobs for new grads are *very* hard to find.

I wonder if directors of nursing programs are telling potential and or current students about this harsh reality. Yes, acute care settings aren't for everyone, but one suspects many entering nursing school assume they will at least start out working in hospital.

MunoRN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care. Has 10 years experience.

Unless one is reading both the article and report incorrectly completers are not a "majority" of BSN graduates.

(page 10) of the report states that 36% of all BSN graduates in NYS were completers and made up 19% of RNs for 2014. Those numbers were expected to increase by one percent in 2015.

http://chws.albany.edu/archive/uploads/2015/06/Nursing_Education_Trends_2005-2015.pdf

That would leave a bit under three-quarters of BSN graduates as "new" nurses.

Information contained in the report is very interesting and worth a read with a coffee or beverage of choice.

For instance in 2014 RN program directors reported "many job" openings for new grads in nursing homes, ambulatory care and home health respectively. Hospitals OTOH reached only around 37%.

One assumes this varies by region but it does echo what is being said over in the NYS forum; hospital jobs for new grads are *very* hard to find.

I wonder if directors of nursing programs are telling potential and or current students about this harsh reality. Yes, acute care settings aren't for everyone, but one suspects many entering nursing school assume they will at least start out working in hospital.

The news article was referring to growth in RN graduates and according to the survey the majority of that growth (60% in the last year) was due to BSN completers, not additional new RNs.

DoGoodThenGo what do you think is a good way differentiate yourself as a new graduate from a BSN nursing program?

smartnurse1982

Has 7 years experience.

So,how many actually passed the boards?

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 14 years experience.

So,how many actually passed the boards?
I would assume that the vast majority passed their boards. Statistically, about 85 percent of all US-educated test takers pass on the first attempt.