Pointers for Success in Nursing School - page 4

The most important thing is to maintain a positive outlook. One of the definitions of courage is being aware of personal weaknesses, fears and uncertainty, yet forging ahead anyway. Believe in... Read More

  1. by   AZ_LPN_8_26_13
    Quote from psychonaut
    Great tips, and allow me to add one of my own: seek out clinical opportunities, especially ones that involve more "doing", and less "observing."

    You may be told by faculty "you'll learn to do _____ in your first year of nursing, focus on critical thinking for now."

    I am the very last person to discount the value of "critical thinking" in nursing practice. However, I felt some aspects of my nursing education were deficient, especially in the area of clinical skills. I also realize that I bear a great share of the responsibility for not being more proactive in seeking out clinical activities.

    Hopefully, you will find staff nurses in your clinical areas who love students. Except for psych, I can remember at least one staff nurse in each of my clinical rotations who eagerly took students (who had the positive attitude Vicky describes). These types of nurses truly "made" my clinical experience, and my only regret is allowing my own nervousness and fear of looking foolish hold me back.

    OK, so I just wrote out the tale of my first (and only) IV start in school, but I've rambled enough already, so I'll skip it. Take home point: this is a profession that takes brains and guts, but it is first and foremost a *clinical* profession. Seek out every clinical opportunity you can get!
    I'm taking your advice - I've just been accepted into a ten-week CNA training program at the hospital where I work while I'm waiting for my placement in nursing school, which will probably happen in the fall of 2010. By then I hope to have a great deal of hands-on clinical experience as a CNA before I start nursing classes. I've heard from many others that having actual hospital experience as a CNA, HUS, or med tech will give you a "leg up" when you are taking nursing classes and doing clinicals.
  2. by   VickyRN
    Quote from PCstudent2009
    I'm taking your advice - I've just been accepted into a ten-week CNA training program at the hospital where I work while I'm waiting for my placement in nursing school, which will probably happen in the fall of 2010. By then I hope to have a great deal of hands-on clinical experience as a CNA before I start nursing classes. I've heard from many others that having actual hospital experience as a CNA, HUS, or med tech will give you a "leg up" when you are taking nursing classes and doing clinicals.
    Excellent. You won't regret this decision. Students with prior CNA experience do have an advantage. Best wishes to you
  3. by   daisyt83
    I'm not a nursing student yet, but I think recording lectures is a really good idea. Could you recommend a good recorder? Thanks!
  4. by   3ast3rnst4r
    I start nursing school on August 17th. I am sooo very very excited. I love reading about nursing school tips and talking to nurses who have been in my shoes before. It is so inspiring to read these blogs. I have been brushing up on my math particularly fractions and equations in preparation for the pharmacology class that I will be taking this first semester. I am so happy to be a part of this wonderful nursing community!
  5. by   DolceVita
    Do you know if there is about to be a new edition of the Saunders Comprehensive Review book you recommend?
  6. by   nevertooold:o)
    I truly appreciate your encouragement! I AM so excited and will begin my courses this coming Monday. I did have a basic question for you...As I stood in line at Pre-Registration (I am attending a community college's 2-year RN program) I heard multiple answers to the same degree questions. I have BA in Biology, and will receive my RN upon completion of this program. Are there any notable restrictions to who may hire me or what I will be permitted to do as an RN b/c I don't actually have a BSN? My original understanding is that an RN is an RN...but does that include higher level positions as an RN?

    Your help is greatly appreciated!!!
  7. by   VickyRN
    Quote from nevertooold:o)
    I truly appreciate your encouragement! I AM so excited and will begin my courses this coming Monday. I did have a basic question for you...As I stood in line at Pre-Registration (I am attending a community college's 2-year RN program) I heard multiple answers to the same degree questions. I have BA in Biology, and will receive my RN upon completion of this program. Are there any notable restrictions to who may hire me or what I will be permitted to do as an RN b/c I don't actually have a BSN? My original understanding is that an RN is an RN...but does that include higher level positions as an RN?

    Your help is greatly appreciated!!!
    Congratulations on your acceptance into nursing school! I address this issue in these blog entries:

    Entry into RN Practice: Associate-Degree Nursing

    Entry into Practice: Baccalaureate Degrees in Nursing

    Best wishes to you

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