How do I break down all this info?

  1. Hi,

    Can someone please give me some advice. I am having trouble breaking down all the info that you get in class, in the books and notes. What is a good rule of thumb for was is the most important to know.

    Thank you,
    T
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    About RNFinally12

    Joined: Mar '08; Posts: 242; Likes: 43
    from US

    4 Comments

  3. by   BradleyRN
  4. by   abz24ecu
    I think we've all been there at some point. I recently graduated from my BSN program in December and the last semester was the biggest struggle of them all--mainly bc of the topics at hand (cardiac, resp, endocrine). It was time consuming nonetheless. I'm sure you have an area you're strong in, and ones not so much like everyone else.

    If you're solid in certain areas, just keep up on it and move on bc you'll NEVER know everything (learned that with nclex preparation haha)

    As for everything else, take each topic one at a time and keep it all general. If you know the foundation of each topic, you can slowly and surely apply it to a more complex/detailed scenerio--ie: ABCs and knowing how the body functions as a whole.

    If you're in a time crunch (and who isnt?) I strongly recommend NCSBN Learning extension for quick and easy to comprehend break-downs on subjects-plus you get Q&A banks (which I personally find more mlike NCLEX than Kaplan--I did both). Even if you only sign up for the 3wk or 5 wk program, it's a great way to learn the systems and get to the juicy stuff thats really important.

    I took my boards March 4, 09 and failed using Kaplan (good class/website, but it really only helped me eliminate options) I also did the Learning Extension and using all the parts of that site are what helped me pass my boards last week. I did about 300 questions a day and even if you're still in nursing school, give yourself that edge with all the practice.

    I hope some of this has helped--good luck to you!!!
  5. by   vashtee
    I don't know what you are studying, but I'd break it down into categories like this:

    Disease & etiology
    Most common symptoms
    how is it diagnosed (include the most obvious abnormal labs)
    most common treatment(s)
    potential complications/what you should be worried about

    I divided a piece of paper into 4 boxes with a circle in the middle. the disease and etiology went in the circle, and the four boxes were for the other categories. Also, I tried to be very brief. You will never be able to memorize every little detail.
  6. by   Daytonite
    for diseases, their treatment and nursing care, use the critical thinking flow sheet for nursing students

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