FAINTING...what made you drop?

  1. I'm a pre-nursing student waiting for my acceptance letter this July. I've been known to faint from time to time. So, here's my question, what made you faint during your time at nursing school?

    I wanted to be a nurse (since I was a little girl), but I stayed away from the field because I listened to my family who thought I wouldn't be able to keep my knees from wabbling. Only after my best friend's daughter graduated as a surgical tech that I revisited my goal. This young lady was known to pass out during class and was laughed at by her peers, but her instructor kept the faith. He told her she could get through it. He said simply, "You have to stay focused. The patient needs you more than the floor does."

    She ended up graduating at the top of her class!

    I would love to be further inspired by another story. So, now that I'm seated, let me know what I'm up against!
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    Joined: Dec '08; Posts: 49; Likes: 2
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    47 Comments

  3. by   CrufflerJJ
    People are affected by different things. For some, it's the gore of a messy OR scene, for others, it may be the smells.

    I ran as an EMT & Paramedic for umpteen years before going to nursing school. I had run as an EMT for a couple years before starting medic school, and had never really been bothered by the blood & whatnot of messy scene responses.

    When I was doing clinical time in a local ER for my medics class, I nearly passed out while watching somebody have an arm cast removed. No blood, no pain, no weird smells - it just happened. Luckily, a nurse noticed my pale skin color & had me sit down before I crashed.

    WHY that caused me to nearly faint, I have no idea. Strange, but true.
  4. by   swirlything
    I nearly passed out in the OR a couple of times. They told me they were used to students hitting the floor in there. One of my classmates did pass out in the OR... before they had made the first cut!
  5. by   oramar
    I have never actually fainted but I remember being a student in the OR during a particular bloody orthopedic surgery and feeling pretty woosie.
  6. by   rachelgeorgina
    We've been told time and time again that it's okay to just step away from the situation when there are other people there and sit down, breathe, take a sip of water and keep cool. It's really been emphasized that it's okay to take a break and no one will judge you for it.
  7. by   mommyonamission
    Wow I never fainted before (well almost when I locked my knees during a hot summer day of band camp...yes, I'm a former band geek..proud and true), BUT I will say that I emphasize with your worries because I CERTAINLY have some of my own. #1 concern would be my fear of needles. Although I will say that after going through two pregnancies, one of which being a natural birth roller coaster of hell, I have become a bit more friendly with the whole needle stick experience.

    From the responses of others here I have to say it's quite comforting to know that instructors may be understanding of the "overwhelming" situations we may have to confront as a nurse; particularly if these are first time experiences!

    I'm a big believer in mind over matter, so if you're determined for the end result (to become a nurse) then you can do it!!!!
  8. by   Music_Box_Dancer
    Quote from mommyonamission

    I'm a big believer in mind over matter, so if you're determined for the end result (to become a nurse) then you can do it!!!!
    Thank you for these encouraging words!
  9. by   hope4thebest
    If nursing is truly something that you really want don't let anything stop you from achieving your goal (even yourself)

    There is always going to be that little voice of doubt in your mind, the key is NOT to let it overpower you. If any doubt ever starts creeping into your mind just simply say to your self "I can do this" or "take a minute to BREATH and COLLECT your thoughs; refocus your mind set "Nursing is NOT about you, it's about the patient"

    Trust me nursing is hard (no doubt) but for every problem there is a way around it (only a matter of figuring out the solution)

    The thing about nursing is after awhile you build a tolerance (the more you are exposed to the enviroment, you will learn tricks that work and those that don't)

    I mean I just recently graduated from nursing school. I remember I had/have alot of bad days (but those bad days are what teaches you and make you a STRONGER individual)

    1# I remember I had an elderly pt vomit clotted blood all over the floor (If I had been a few seconds slower it would have been on me.)

    The only true advice I can give you is you need to prepare yourself MENTALLY everytime you enter the patients room (expect the unexpected and anticipate what may or could happen)

    Wish you nothing but the best
  10. by   swirlything
    Hope4thebest wrote:"If nursing is truly something that you really want don't let anything stop you from achieving your goal (even yourself)"

    I REALLY agree with that statement. When I started nursing school I was seriously afraid of needles. I had some really bad experiences with IV starts in the hospital; I passed out when I got my ears pierced; I refuse to give blood, etc.

    Now, I graduate this week. I give shots without a second thought. I've done blood draws and started an IV or two as well. I still cringe a bit when the needle's headed for me... but I have come a long way to conquering that fear. All beause I wasn't going to let it stop me from becoming a nurse!
  11. by   Music_Box_Dancer
    Dear Hope4theBest, every now and then you come across a story, thread, or posting that hits home...this is the case with what you wrote. A sincere thank you for taking the time to inspire me, and I'm sure other soon-to-be-students. It always makes me smile when I realize a complete stranger cares enough to step forward.

    Time is our most precious commodity...thank you for spending some of yours on me.
  12. by   Music_Box_Dancer
    Quote from swirlything
    ... but I have come a long way to conquering that fear. All beause I wasn't going to let it stop me from becoming a nurse!
    That is so awesome! Now I cannot wait for my acceptance letter AND for my dreadful nickname "Rubber Legs" to get dropped!
  13. by   zsbaby
    Had a pt. at a LTC who had diabetes and neuropathy in his feet. He had a wound on his heel, with necrotic tissue, tunneling, and pus. As nursing students we had to take turns cleaning it. It wasn't cleaning it that got me, it was watching the other students clean it. I started getting very sweaty, nauseated, and light headed...had to spend a few minutes standing out in the snow.
  14. by   Music_Box_Dancer
    Zsbaby, do you think it was because you were concentrating on the pt when it was your turn and let your mind wonder when it wasn't? Mind over matter is what we've been discussing on a few of these threads. Just wanted to know your thoughts on that?

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