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Nursing shortages, Baby boomers and the immigrant nurse Part 2

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madwife2002 has 26 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in RN, BSN, CHDN.

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It has been a couple of weeks since we reviewed the ongoing poll about foreign trained nurses in the USA and the trend towards blaming immigrant nurses for taking the jobs which should or should not belong to American Nurses.

Nursing shortages, Baby boomers and the immigrant nurse Part 2

Update on Nursing shortages, Baby boomers and the immigrant nurse

The opinion is almost equally divided between the main two options - please review poll thread for further information.

Now what we really should investigate is when we say 'foreign nurses' who are we really referring to? Are we referring to Green Card holder? Or are we referring to foreign born and trained RN's? Is there a difference I hear you contemplating? Well I could predict that this would alter the opinions because those who are finger pointing may well have Green Cards themselves, even though they have probably lived for most of their lives in the USA, or have parents who remain legal Aliens and not US citizens.

Nobody complains about legal Aliens who are not RN's in the same way yet the majority and I say majority loosely because it is my opinion that almost 100% of nurses in the US are either 'legal aliens' or are already 'US Citizens, the exception these days are some Canadians who are still on working visas.

I am pretty sure somebody will prove me wrong, but hey that is the fun of these blog's and hopefully initiates some good conversation in a safe environment.

It is also my belief that the ones who criticize have no to little complaints against British, Canadian, Australian, and any other English as a first language speaking RN? The main complaints seem to be against Filipinos, Indian, and any RN who has an accent. Ok now I will bow my head and wait!

So I leave you with a thought If you are a Green Card Holder who trains in the US to be a RN, are you taking the jobs from the American Nurses or is this acceptable????

RN with 26 years of experience many of those years spent in dialysis. I have worked in acute care, home, ICHD as a CN, FA, and currently a director.

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Now what we really should investigate is when we say ‘foreign nurses’ who are we really referring to? Are we referring to Green Card holder? Or are we referring to foreign born and trained RN’s? Is there a difference I hear you contemplating?

Mainly, from what I see is that no one has a problem with non-US citizen nurses already here. They just don't want OTHERS being imported.

Is also my belief that the ones who criticize have no to little complaints against British, Canadian, Australian, and any other English as a first language speaking RN? The main complaints seem to be against Filipinos, Indian, and any RN who has an accent.
This is not quite as it appears. I imagine it is not so much that people have problems with Filipinos or Indians so much. I think that people SEE people from these countries most often. In 9 years of nursing I've met Africans from every African country. I've met Indians that are Hindus and also Sikhs. Indians from all over India. I've also met hundreds of Filipinos. I have NEVER met a foreign nurse from a country in Europe other than one that was from Germany.

I think it is like this everywhere. European countries just don't export that many people. So while it may seem that someone is picking on a group like Filipinos, it may just be that the person giving the opinion has only dealt with people from the Philippines or whichever country the mention.

Before I moved to DC all the foreign nursing staff I ever met were Filipinos. When I moved to DC it was more mixed. My entire night shift except 2 people are Filipino. 75% of the entire staff are African and there are 3 Indian nurses.

There IS an Irish private duty CNA though.

Just my :twocents:

Edited by Atheos

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madwife2002 has 26 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in RN, BSN, CHDN.

1 Follower; 74 Articles; 4,777 Posts; 121,165 Profile Views

Thanks Atheos for opening the debate I love playing devils advocat and enjoy a good debate

Edited by madwife2002

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nurseforlife specializes in telemetry, medsurg, homecare, psychiatry.

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Ok, my question is why are they complaining about foreign nurses taking all the nursing jobs, while a nursing shortage is still evident? That really makes no sense.

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2,098 Posts; 16,238 Profile Views

Nursing shortage?

Really?

Are you not seeing all the threads about nurses that can't get a job?

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nurseforlife specializes in telemetry, medsurg, homecare, psychiatry.

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The question is...is there really a nursing shortage? YES. I think there is... and it is not Isolated in the US only. Do i think that there just happens to be more nurses that are picking up shifts, or going back to work because their spouse was laid off....YES. But this is temporary, and once the recession is over then there will be a lot more nurses retiring,or cutting back hours. Do i think that the nursing shortage will be greatest in the next five years...ABSOLUTELY When all the baby boomers retire. Do i think that that the US should try to hire there own nurses first... Sure. My question is, how many nurses who take a shift are working short staffed as we speak?

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madwife2002 has 26 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in RN, BSN, CHDN.

1 Follower; 74 Articles; 4,777 Posts; 121,165 Profile Views

I agree there is still a nursing shortage but due to the financial crisis hospitals are tightening their belts before the crunch really hits, as I doubt we have really seen the highest point yet. Many hospitals are making their staff spread further, not employing staff when employees leave but still expecting the same high quality and not understanding that staff are stretched to the limit. The management dont care at the moment how staff are treated because In Phoenix the management has the upper hand again and nurses are 10 a penny. So basically you lose one there are a lot to take their place. The attitude where I work is you dont like the way it is, there is the door, I have even heard us told that we are very lucky to have a job. These kind of statements make staff feel vunerable and employees toe the line.

Many staff at my work have been their long term and dont want to find other employment starting all over again in their career. So again the management know this and have the upper hand.

I have noticed that staff are complaining less out loud, but mumbling in corners. A very negative erosive environment

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although an immigrant nurse, i dont see myself as one. i see big differences between the way american nurses think and act and talk, but feel part of the working team. but other immigrant nurses who come from other countries certainly act and speak in a different way to me, the problem with the area that i live in, is not just the economy which is hurting the hospitals, but there are many nursing schools which are churning out loads of new grads who are all looking to get jobs in this area. this is hurting the area's economy as nurses are finding more and more difficulty getting new jobs if they want to move. so its not just immigrant nurses who are hurting the job situation.

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That is very true, professors and school are telling them to go ahead down this career path and that there is a shortage.

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Well I was not born in the United States, but I am a naturalized US Citizen, my country is now the United States, where I live, where my family lives, where my friends and fellow Americans live, and the same is for the permanent residents of the United States (Green card Holders) who will live and work all their lives in the US.

I have worked hard and earned my position with lots of tears, if I hadn't become a nurse I would still be living in the United States regardless, still working here. Working as what ? Maybe I would frying nuggets at McDonalds, sweeping the floors of a local mall (Nothing wrong with people who this, we need them too) ? Is this what I deserve because I have an accent or a tanned skin ? Should I be a second class american citizen ? Is not America that land of opportunity for everybody, the land that has attracted people from all over the world for centuries ?. It is Immigration that has made America stronger, since its early beginnings with the pelgrims.

So in my personal battle, I had to decide to stay at MC D's frying nuggets or become a nurse ? So I became an RN, then recently became a Doctor, now in the process to apply for a residency in Surgery. I will live in the States no matter what I work, I've decided to give america my best and serve its people, and also make a better life for me and my family. Think about this ? If you are an US born american having the job of hiring nurses, would you hire me ? Or would you hire an RN who is your cousin or your bother in law ? You'd definitely be very tempted to hire him over me, unless you need me. I don't think this foreigners are taking anyone's job, the country itself need this input of foreign nurses as well as the american nurses. But I may be wrong.... This is just my humble thoughts.

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nurseforlife specializes in telemetry, medsurg, homecare, psychiatry.

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Very well put Danger S! Well i guess from reading prior posts even from different areas it seems that many nurse grads are experiencing difficulty with finding work. I am reading about this all the time. It was not easy for me when i graduated in 1995 in Canada. There was no work for new grads and i remember many lay offs during that time. I worked as a sitter in an retirement home because i couldn't find work as an RN. I took a job in TEXAS because i wanted to start to get experience as an RN. It was very difficult for me even coming from Canada. I had to learn how to function as an independent nurse, and understand my patients who many of them only spoke Spanish. My advice for new grads is to get the experience they need even if it means moving out of your own town. I can't emphasize the importance of getting the experience, and being able to relocate if you have to. It will put you one step ahead of the competition.

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bosnanurse has 6 years experience and specializes in Cardiac care/Ortho/LTC/Education/Psych.

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Thanks Danger. All with you in this thought process. I wish if I could put a little bit of my accent to this post but you said it same I would said it. I am going for my MSN and hopefully later for PhD and I do not think I took anybodies job:)))

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