Jump to content

Nursing shortage: 1 in 5 quits within first year, study says

News   (22,705 Views 88 Comments)

Ginger's Mom has 41 years experience as a MSN, RN.

1 Article; 22,360 Profile Views; 3,179 Posts

advertisement

You are reading page 7 of Nursing shortage: 1 in 5 quits within first year, study says. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

anc33 has 7 years experience and specializes in Oncology, Research.

327 Posts; 5,354 Profile Views

Curious I was reading through this thread and I see many people claiming that the clinical experience is lacking. As a medical student it really depends on the rotations but we have been told that we would follow the same schedule as the residents and cant leave unless dismissed by the attending or resident.

Now I understand clinicals are set up very differently for nursing students but does any school offer 12 hours clinicals that follow the same schedule as the nursing staff?

Our practicum consisted of an entire semester of following a staff nurse for all of their shifts. My preceptor worked 12hr night shifts and I was right there with her. If she picked up overtime so did I. By the time I graduated I was used to working 4 night shifts in a row. I was actually very well prepared for the floor after graduation as were most of my classmates. This was part of an accelerated BSN program. I just wanted to throw that in there since I know many people think we have less clinical hours than ASN or traditional BSN programs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hotflashion has 4 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Foot care.

280 Posts; 9,875 Profile Views

Now I understand clinicals are set up very differently for nursing students but does any school offer 12 hours clinicals that follow the same schedule as the nursing staff?

In my four year school (BSN), senior year, spring semester, nursing students spend 21 hours a week working one on one, with a nurse preceptor (we call it a practicum). The preceptor is a nurse who works at the hospital, and we had to fit our schedule to theirs. As it turned out, I did work two twelve hour shifts every other weekend and then some other 12 hour days on the alternate weeks. My preceptor was my supervisor. I also had a faculty supervisor (not sure what the exact title was) who visited me once a week on site, for about an hour; she usually conferred with me, but would also confer with my preceptor if time allowed. I and the other seniors in her group (I think there were 6 of us) also met once a week on campus for clinical discussions.

I thought this was standard at 4 year schools.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bubbles has 35 years experience and specializes in Hospice, Case Mgt., RN Consultant, ICU.

158 Posts; 4,999 Profile Views

I was hired immediately after graduation to a pediatrics unit. I had ZERO orientation. The nurse manager told me that I had to "count" immediately and being young and dumb, I listened to him. I am lucky I did not lose my license. I've told this story before but my one and only RN coworker was often in a diabetic crisis and she also had an MI at work during my first summer. I can remember calling the supervisor for emergency help, trying to get my coworker to the ER and two sets of angry parents standing at the desk while call lights and IVs were going off and three babies were screaming in their cribs without mothers.

Situations like this should not be happening!:mad: This is just nuts!!! And when this young nurse called the supervisor for help was she scolded because she needed help? When I was only two years out of nursing school and working as a Team Leader on an acute rehab floor in a well respected hospital in a major SW city we were always short of staff and having to work overtime. One day was so bad it was like where to start? I called the supervisor and all she did was write me up for asking for help! What the purpose of the supervisors in that hospital was I have not idea. Turnover was terrible. The longer one worked there the less money one made and of course, discussing salaries was grounds for termination. Within less than a year I was one of the oldies! The good news is I left for another hospital and went back to ICU/CCU where we had supportive supervisors and nurses stayed year after year. It is pitiful the conditions so many nurses are working under and these conditions are very dangerous for the patients as well. Question is - what can nurses do? Nursing can be a great profession with many opportunities, but something obviously needs to be done with some hospitals!! :lol2:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sunrock has 28 years experience and specializes in Medical surgical.

197 Posts; 5,675 Profile Views

:yeah:

While I'm still a student and haven't yet gotten to the employed stage I have given this alot of thought. School doesn't give you anywhere enough experience as you need to be comfortable and even though we are comfortable at clinicals a lot has to do with having your classmates aound and an instructor at your disposal.

Having gone through the thought process I would like my first job to be a medium pace where I can master the fundementals. As much as I would like to go into critical care once I'm an RN ( working on LVN now) I don't think I would do it straight out of school.

As one of my favorite always says "you new what do you know yet?"

I get the fact that nurses being overworked makes them less likely to want to mentor new nurses but if they don't then attrition will continue and they'll still be overworked.

No one came out of their mother.s womb a nurse. We all had to be preceptored,that is part of the problem, that corporate nursing, and the ones lobbying have to understand. Gone i believe are the days of caring, not all, BUT reading posts on several forum, God help us when we nurses need a nurse.............. :yawn:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1 Post; 728 Profile Views

I am in the BSN program at ucla and will be graduating in a year. We barely just started our clinicals, and its the end of the year...something wrong with this picture? I agree that we have little to no practical experience, and I feel like I am almost begging to learn more skills, because we waste an enormous amount of time on useless prereqs. Its gotten to a point where I made the decision to take on summer nursing internships right beside my fulltime summer school schedule just to be able to get ahead. Those internships are enormously competitive, so I can only imagine what its like right now in the economy, especially with this new and unfortunate health care bill. Hospitals must be gripping at straws wondering what to do about funding. And here we are praying that our hard earned education will land us a job rather than homeless and unemployed. Homeless registered nurses with a lot of knowledge to offer the world. Our teachers also act like becoming an RN is just a stepping stone of some kind or some inconvenience we need to get through. They say a lot of things like "when you're NP's you need to know how to assess for this disease and that." Shouldnt a physical assessment class like that be taught in the NP program? What about RNs and what do we need to focus on in order to build our skills in the position that we actually came to school for? I heard ucla didnt even want to reopen the BSN program because they didnt want to be training clinicians, but rather training people to go into graduate school and academia. And I guess that's what they are doing with us. Either way, Im not having it and will do whatever I can to build my skills elsewhere. Because I think that if things continue the way they are next year, I will need to be as competitive as possible because no matter what people say about new grads, we ARE entitled to those opportunities. We worked hard for it, at least for those of us who really want to become nurses and take all the challenges that come our way. If anything, we are underpaid for the types of things we are expected to deal with. But fine, as long as we get the big break we deserve. So please all you recruiters and managers, try to remember what it was like to be in our shoes before you dismiss us. You can criticize our attitudes or lack of skills, but the reality is that you were once in our shoes, and we know this. And we hope to be better than that when we are one day in your shoes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sunrock has 28 years experience and specializes in Medical surgical.

197 Posts; 5,675 Profile Views

BRAVO, i also want the recruiters to remember, that even with their clinicals, students would try to seek out opportunities to get skills, and when they have 7-8 students, they never watched you. That is whey i cannot understand also why they put down distance learning. I have been an lpn for years, and an hematology tech., yrs. of experience, then back in the 80's i was asked to help preceptor new RNs who then became out headnurses. The supvrs. never came on the floor to help those students. The nurses that have their MSN and has moved on to teaching, are now looking down on RN as entry level, and BSN also as entry level. What is a person to do. Hospitals do not have the funding like you stated to pay the hrs. for precepting, so with no monies left now you have to take all of the 'ACLS, BLS, CPR ETC. ETC., to get a job. New York now is flooded and i just heard that the unions will be farming out the old nurses from the hospitals that just closed to other states, OMG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sunrock has 28 years experience and specializes in Medical surgical.

197 Posts; 5,675 Profile Views

I met a bunch of BSN students about a month ago, who was doing a criticare rotation, and the older nurses were telling them that they were too slow, goodness they just got out of school, pushing them to read ekg, and they do not even know how to put in a foley one student told me, then they look down on lpns. i am an RN. Went thru the mill, and it is very dishardening when i hear this. Then they rotate them days and night with this new bridge program, the students are so glad to get a job, BUT WANT TO QUIT.?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sunrock has 28 years experience and specializes in Medical surgical.

197 Posts; 5,675 Profile Views

Things have changed, they leave you on your own now, and pop in and say "how YA doing" , can you believe that. Then sometimes they inform you that a certain procedure is going to be done by staff RN, you better get in there, this may be your only opportunity. ARGHH!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sunrock has 28 years experience and specializes in Medical surgical.

197 Posts; 5,675 Profile Views

I have seen some nursing programs with courses for returning nurses, may be the new nurses after graduation can sign up, just a thought.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hotflashion has 4 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Foot care.

280 Posts; 9,875 Profile Views

I have seen some nursing programs with courses for returning nurses, may be the new nurses after graduation can sign up, just a thought.

Actually, a year out and no job, I've just finished the Am. Red Cross phlebotomy class and I'm considering a "refresher course." One course I saw was advertised specifically for nurses who'd been out of the field for at least 10 years. The one I'm considering doesn't have that restriction, but I haven't talked to them yet; still considering my options.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

378 Posts; 4,661 Profile Views

At the beginning of fall semester I ran into a friend of mines in the library who was a first semester nursing student and she told me that they were supposed to be doing their clinicals but they could not find placements at the hospitals for all of them. What's up with that?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4,115 Posts; 40,277 Profile Views

At the beginning of fall semester I ran into a friend of mines in the library who was a first semester nursing student and she told me that they were supposed to be doing their clinicals but they could not find placements at the hospitals for all of them. What's up with that?

Could be a any of several reasons.The demand of student nurses exceeds the supply of hospital or other clinical settings ability to accomodate them.Patient census is not high enough to accomodate number of students requiring clinical time. Depending upon how the program's clinicals are set up, there may not be enough RNs to pair up with a student.And so forth and so on.With so many hospitals closing in some areas, it is not uncommon to find students from several programs all bunched into those that remain. There is also in this current economic climate many persons are putting off elective operations which means fewer admissions. Hospitals are reducing hours and or days for staff nurses due to low census

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing 0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×