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Nursing schools that are mostly or entirely at night?

Pre-Nursing   (225 Views 6 Comments)
by Yagyu55 Yagyu55 (New Member) New Member

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To make a long story short: I’m an aspiring nurse (currently doing pre-reqs for bsn), and I also have a sleep disorder (dspd). It’s a neurological disability like narcolepsy, it is not something psychological or something that sleep hygiene or any alarm can cure. Basically, I’m a super night owl, I’m essentially only functional from the afternoon through the night.

The nurses I’ve spoken to have said finding a job probably won’t be a big issue, since working a 3-3 or 7-7 is ideal for me anyway. The real issue is school. As my diagnosis has become more clear I now know morning classes are simply out of the question. At this point my only two options are to find a different career, or find a different school where classes are only in the evenings/night. The most ideal situation would be evening classes as well as evening clinicals.

So my question is, does anyone know of/ has gone to a school like that? My potentially becoming a nurse does hinge on whether or not something like that exists. Any specific school recommendations would be hugely helpful! I live in Colorado and have looked at the options here, but I’m likely willing to travel if there’s a school that meets what I’m looking for. Thanks 

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3 Followers; 96,591 Visitors; 36,686 Posts

Since nursing students are admonished not to work during nursing school, evening classes would be seen as accommodating those who work during the day. Occasionally one can have evening clinical placements, but that is very rare. The only evening nursing program I have seen mentioned here is at Mt. St. Mary’s University  in Los Angeles, not an inexpensive option.

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NICU Guy has 4 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in NICU.

1 Follower; 31,364 Visitors; 3,364 Posts

Have you tried Chronotherapy for your DSPD? I managed a Sleep Disorder Clinic for 14 yrs prior to nursing. Chronotherapy (advancing your sleep time 1-3 hrs later each day until the desired sleep time is achieved) seemed to help most people.

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I was in an evening program in a different state. Evening classes were usually 5pm-10pm or 4pm-9pm. Several of my classmates chose this schedule cause they worked night shift a few days a week others so could still work during the day, so schedule met their needs. Programs are out there if willing to relocate. However, my entire time there, they only had 2 evening clinical rotations and in very last semester. 

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6 hours ago, NICU Guy said:

Have you tried Chronotherapy for your DSPD? I managed a Sleep Disorder Clinic for 14 yrs prior to nursing. Chronotherapy (advancing your sleep time 1-3 hrs later each day until the desired sleep time is achieved) seemed to help most people.

The specialists I see (and in my understanding, most now in general) are not typically recommending chronotherapy because of the significant risk of it causing non-24 disorder for people, which would be much worse to live with. It's a roll of the dice, and has helped people I'm sure, but since I already teeter fairly close to having non-24 they're not recommending it. I appreciate the recommendation and thought though!

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myoglobin has 11 years experience as a ASN, BSN, MSN and specializes in ICU, trauma, neuro.

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Almost any program is going to have some day shift clinical if not classes. Also most RN jobs are going to make you do some orientation on days even if you are hired as night-shift. I've always been a night person and I got through it with extra sleep, black out curtains, sleep sound machine, melatonin, and valerian root tea (to help sleep) and lots of caffeine to stay awake during the day. However, you might need something like Provigil/Modafinil or Adderall to get through an RN program. Unless you are blind I wouldn't worry too much about permanent non 24. Also CBI-I has proven efficacy in treating primary or secondary insomnia.  You may also consider melatonin and light therapy to help with a day-shift schedule.  

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