World's Smallest Baby Heads Home From S. FL Hopsital

  1. http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,252878,00.html

    Baby weighed 10oz and was 9.5 inches long, born at 22 weeks gestation.
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    About BabyRN2Be

    Joined: Feb '04; Posts: 2,574; Likes: 322
    SAHM, for now.; from WI , US

    16 Comments

  3. by   BabyRN2Be
    I've just read that this baby is not being discharged today, no details have been given.

    FoxNews Website

    Born at just under 22 weeks gestation on Oct. 24, Amillia Sonja Taylor is the world's youngest surviving premature baby.



    MIAMI- The world's smallest premature baby will remain in the hospital a few more days as a precaution, hospital officials said Tuesday.
    Barbara Moore, spokeswoman for Baptist Children's Hospital, said she did not have further details on why the doctors changed their mind about sending Amillia Sonja Taylor home Tuesday.
    Doctors say Amillia is the first baby known to survive after a gestation period of fewer than 23 weeks. She was just 9 1/2 inches long and weighed less than 10 ounces when she was born Oct. 24. She was delivered after just under 22 weeks of pregnancy; full-term births come after 37 to 40 weeks.
    The baby has suffered respiratory and digestive problems, as well as a mild brain hemorrhage, but doctors believe the health concerns will not have major long-term effects.
    "Her prognosis is excellent," said Dr. Paul Fassbach, who has cared for Amillia since her second day.
    Amillia was conceived in vitro and has been in an incubator since birth. She has received oxygen and will continue to get a small amount even after she goes home.
    (Story continues below)
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    She is the first child for Eddie and Sonja Taylor of Homestead. She was delivered by Caesarean section and now weighs about 4 1/2 pounds and is just over 15 1/2 inches long. Previously doctors stated she was about 25 inches long.
  4. by   Spidey's mom
    I heard the news that she was being discharged but it was early early this morning while I was driving home.

    I wondered at the time what her "injuries" were . .being born that soon.

    Thanks for the link.

    steph
  5. by   jjjoy
    Boy - the first time I read this thread's title I had to do a double take because I intially read it like this....

    World's Smallest Baby Heads - Home From S. FL Hopsital

    baby heads???? No! baby heads home... Doh...:smackingf

    :roll :roll :roll
    Last edit by jjjoy on Feb 20, '07
  6. by   BabyRN2Be
    Joy, :trout: Blame FoxNews because I took the intro directly from their website. And you are right, when you read it that way... um yeah, it sounds funny.

    Now I'm just waiting for all parents who want to induce labor to end their pregnancies early, because they hate being pregnant. They'll point to this story and say, "If that baby born at 22 weeks can do it, my little jr can because I'm dying to get back into a size six dress" or another stupid, asinine remark.

    They really should at least TRY to put a disclaimer on there that this is a one in a million baby, if she truly has an "excellent" prognosis. Just my
  7. by   Quickbeam
    They really should at least TRY to put a disclaimer on there that this is a one in a million baby
    I heard an interview with the baby's neonatologist last night on NPR and he said this same thing. He indicated he's fearing that everyone will think they'll get a good outcome with such a tiny baby. Also talked about resources needed being so astronomical.

    I never worked neonatal but did work pediatric brain injury for over a decade. I used to dread the stories the papers got a hold of because they would always say "Little Jimmy's Good as New!" when we all knew Jimmy was facing a lifetime of cognitive deficits. The next near drowning would come in and the parents would already be talking about Little Jimmy.
  8. by   Humbled_Nurse
    There is a thread in the NICU forum about this baby. They brought up a good and relevant point that the baby may actually be 23weeks + 6days which would make a big difference. Saving babies at that gestational age is fairly common and not necessarily "miraculous and record breaking" Apparently they are basing the age of the baby on the conceptual date and not mom's last period hence the 2 week difference. Although the baby's size is not consistent with a 23 + 6 week baby, the baby was likely IUGR.

    I really don't see how a 21+ 6 week baby could survive, not that I don't believe in miracles. I think her survival is still miraculous because of her very small size.
  9. by   GardenDove
    Quote from Quickbeam
    I heard an interview with the baby's neonatologist last night on NPR and he said this same thing. He indicated he's fearing that everyone will think they'll get a good outcome with such a tiny baby. Also talked about resources needed being so astronomical.

    I never worked neonatal but did work pediatric brain injury for over a decade. I used to dread the stories the papers got a hold of because they would always say "Little Jimmy's Good as New!" when we all knew Jimmy was facing a lifetime of cognitive deficits. The next near drowning would come in and the parents would already be talking about Little Jimmy.
    I personally think medicine has gone too far in saving young babies. I think it's a poor use of limited medical resources. I'm pro-life, but I do think there should be an age limit, just my opinion.
  10. by   Leilah75_RN
    we had a premature baby smaller than that and 21 weeks +?days in Saudi Arabia hospital. he survived in our NICCU for more than 6 months before he died of sepsis. not a respiratory failure or so, it is bec of the ulcer on both knees. he is too fragile and too small to hold.
  11. by   tofutti
    From the Foxnews article:

    "The baby has suffered respiratory and digestive problems, as well as a mild brain hemorrhage, but doctors believe the health concerns will not have major long-term effects."

    I'm no expert, but I've been working for 2 months on a research paper on how preterm birth affects long term development. As an extremely low birthweight baby: depending on other factors she has a 50% chance of severe cognitive and motor impairments, and about 10% chance of cerebral palsy. Likelihood of needing special ed, repeating grades in school, behavior problems, and below normal IQ: about 70%.

    The outcomes improve greatly for every extra week they spend in utero, of course.

    Magazine type sources have consistently painted a rosier picture than medical journals, from what I've seen.

    Tofutti
  12. by   Jo Dirt
    Quote from GardenDove
    I personally think medicine has gone too far in saving young babies. I think it's a poor use of limited medical resources. I'm pro-life, but I do think there should be an age limit, just my opinion.
    I don't know, I strongly think it is a poor use of medical resources on a lot of things they do with the elderly.

    It may be easy to say let nature take its course with babies but as I sit here at 23 weeks pregnant and having just seen the ultrasound yesterday with the baby scratching his head and pulling on his ear and moving all around (they even saw his little dinkie plain as day on the ultrasound) if I were to go into premature labor I would want them to do what they could to save him. They even estimated him at a pound and a half already.
  13. by   GardenDove
    Quote from motorcycle mama
    I don't know, I strongly think it is a poor use of medical resources on a lot of things they do with the elderly.

    It may be easy to say let nature take its course with babies but as I sit here at 23 weeks pregnant and having just seen the ultrasound yesterday with the baby scratching his head and pulling on his ear and moving all around (they even saw his little dinkie plain as day on the ultrasound) if I were to go into premature labor I would want them to do what they could to save him. They even estimated him at a pound and a half already.
    I agree, medicine overstep it's bounds in many futile cases. I'm totally anti-abortion, btw, but I do believe it's become almost a competition to save ultra tiny babies whose outcomes are oftentimes not rosy. Meanwhile, we abort how many babies a year? In my opinion something is out of whack with that picture.
  14. by   Jo Dirt
    Quote from GardenDove
    I agree, medicine overstep it's bounds in many futile cases. I'm totally anti-abortion, btw, but I do believe it's become almost a competition to save ultra tiny babies whose outcomes are oftentimes not rosy. Meanwhile, we abort how many babies a year? In my opinion something is out of whack with that picture.
    That's right. It's called the cycle of life for a reason, and sometimes people just don't know when it's time to give it up. I guess in theory it's easy for me to say let them go when the time comes, but I'd be a liar if I said I wouldn't try to save my baby. I'm anti-abortion too, and it really is grotesque how they will abort babies up into the third trimester then you will have people who will do all they can to save babies who haven't reached the age of viability, it's like some kind of sick game.

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