What it takes to solve the nursing shortage - page 2

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  1. by   Valerie Salva
    There's no damn shortage. I am sick to my eyeballs of hearing about it. Total BS.
  2. by   Valerie Salva
    Quote from lindarn
    PTs, OTs, SPs, are in demand because they hve graduate levels of entry into practice. This additional educational education discourages individuals who are looking for a "quick" career to make the bucks.

    I have has PTs, OTs, all tell me that they are glad that the entrance requirements have been increased. They know that this works to keep their numbers down and their services in demand, which increases their pay.

    Their governing body works to keep them in demand and to keep the numbers low. In other words, unlike nursing, they look out for their members. Imagine that.

    Things will never change in nursing until we are no longer a dime a dozen, and we increase our educatgional levals. It has worked for other professions, and it can work in nursing. It will also act as a unifying force which we so desparately need. JMHO and my NY $0.02.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    While I agree that we should raise the educational entrance requrements to become a nurse, I don't think it will make nay difference in how we are treated. I don't see mgmt asking any nurse- "Are you an ADN or a BSN?" before they throw the latest bs on us and treat us like children.
  3. by   hope3456
    Am I the only one who has a sneaking suspicion that nsg schools are graduating far to many students? Let's face it - we all want to work and it seems to me nsg school is alot to go thru w/o being able to find employment as such. I doubt as many students would be subjecting themselves to those horrendous waitlists if they knew about the problems with getting hired - as we now seeing. Nsg schools and their area hospitals really should be coorelating the projected need for nurses and how many students they take each year.

    did y'all read the above post about how wyoming medical center in Casper wyo, who IS hiring new grads right now, has been flooded with apps from new grads from as far away as Hawaii? a couple years ago, wyo saw so many of their nsg grads leaving for higher paying states (wyo is one of the lowest paid) that they were paying the student's tuition for an agreement to work in wyo for 2 years. this is ridiculous and quite upsetting.
  4. by   Teresag_CNS
    I've written it before here, but here goes again: whether or not there is a nursing shortage depends upon who is allowed to define shortage. If we let employers who institute hiring freezes and nurse layoffs when there are patients in dire need of nursing care define shortage, then all of you who claim there is no shortage are correct. If our profession chooses to define shortage by the number of unmet needs of people in hospitals, nursing homes, and outpatient settings who need nursing care, then we have a dire shortage. If nurses are working in understaffed units where choices are being made between who gets bathed and whose dressing gets changed, there is a severe nursing shortage.

    Not being able to find your preferred position out of school does not mean there is no shortage, as said above. As the economy rebounds, quickly the demand for nurses, and the great flexibility in job choices that we usually enjoy, will return. This has very little to do with the supply of nurses.

    Assuming that there is no nursing shortage because employers are not hiring at his time, in this economy, in your preferred position is not helpful to the nursing profession; it buys directly into the propaganda that health administrators would like our policymakers to believe - that nurses are expendable. Please think critically about the message you may be sending in denying the existence of a shortage.
    Last edit by Teresag_CNS on Jun 27, '09 : Reason: fixed mixed metaphor
  5. by   c_beshore_rn
    Dear Mr President:
    Please release some of your Economic Stimuli upon the nursing profession. Please allow hospitals grant money to put new grad training programs into place. Allow them to support several new grads in different units around the hospital so they can have the "HOLY GRAIL" of nursing: EXPERIENCE. This would solve all your "nursing shortage" issues. Then all "new grads" could become "experienced nurses" and fill staffing shortages around the nation.
    sincerely a sincere smart ass nurse.
  6. by   OC_An Khe
    The simple answer is money and the shortage is real.
    The more complex answer is along the lines of the preceding post by Teresaq. Nursing as a profession has no control over how the profession is practiced. It is the people who pay for our services, not the patients, but the insurance company, government, MDs and administrators who control the profession. As long as we let them decide what is good nursing care, what are acceptable patient to RN ratios, what are the acceptable hours we are required to work they have control. They will determine if there is a shortage or not. We need to gain control of our practice, how many hours it is safe to work, how many patients we care for. It is we who will then determine if there is a shortage or not. By being quiet about the above we are agreeing to let outsiders control our profession. Can anyone name another profession that allows this?
  7. by   karenchad
    what it will take is the banning together all nursing through the American Nursing Association, American Association of Critical Care Nurses( 2 large membership and forefront groups right there that if they banned together the voice and power would be awesome) all the Certification Associations- MED/SUG(especially with their ratios) all the state nursing associations and all the nursing unions. If all these association would ban together and grow a very strong backbone - their power and voice would be something that could not be ignored. They should be speaking, preaching, filabustering with the realization it is not a shorage defined by NO nurses but NO JOBS available to competenly and safely take care of patients. They are our voice and should be in washington/to the President expressing and EDUCATING there this PROBLEM , it's magnitude and what is at stake and must take back the controll and regulation of OUR nursing profession. Not leaving it to congressmen who are clueless to what nursing is and whose only reference is what is on TV. We all have a part in this- every nurse in the US should be letter writing, e-mailing their voice to our associations( under the" contact us " drop down box).
  8. by   karenchad
    the control and regulation set by these NURSING associations need to be set on LAW- violations should be heavily FINED, CLOSED DOWN, and IMPRISONED. The voice needs to be strong and powerful enough to have CEOs and the hospital administrators fired and replaced with people who have NURSING backrounds NOT MBA's we are not MACY's or WALMART.
  9. by   Valerie Salva
    Quote from c_beshore_rn
    Dear Mr President:
    Please release some of your Economic Stimuli upon the nursing profession. Please allow hospitals grant money to put new grad training programs into place. Allow them to support several new grads in different units around the hospital so they can have the "HOLY GRAIL" of nursing: EXPERIENCE. This would solve all your "nursing shortage" issues. Then all "new grads" could become "experienced nurses" and fill staffing shortages around the nation.
    sincerely a sincere smart ass nurse.

    How about hospital corp CEOs giving up some of their hundreds of millions a year in salary to train new grads?
    I don't think tax payer stimulous money should pay for new grad internships, just because hospital fat cats are too greedy to pay for it.
  10. by   Valerie Salva
    Quote from karenchad
    the control and regulation set by these NURSING associations need to be set on LAW- violations should be heavily FINED, CLOSED DOWN, and IMPRISONED. The voice needs to be strong and powerful enough to have CEOs and the hospital administrators fired and replaced with people who have NURSING backrounds NOT MBA's we are not MACY's or WALMART.

    Exactly.
  11. by   Adobo2009RN
    You said it RIGHT!


    Quote from Valerie Salva
    How about hospital corp CEOs giving up some of their hundreds of millions a year in salary to train new grads?
    I don't think tax payer stimulous money should pay for new grad internships, just because hospital fat cats are too greedy to pay for it.
  12. by   Teresag_CNS
    Quote from hope3456
    Am I the only one who has a sneaking suspicion that nsg schools are graduating far to many students? Let's face it - we all want to work and it seems to me nsg school is alot to go thru w/o being able to find employment as such. I doubt as many students would be subjecting themselves to those horrendous waitlists if they knew about the problems with getting hired - as we now seeing. Nsg schools and their area hospitals really should be coorelating the projected need for nurses and how many students they take each year.

    did y'all read the above post about how wyoming medical center in Casper wyo, who IS hiring new grads right now, has been flooded with apps from new grads from as far away as Hawaii? a couple years ago, wyo saw so many of their nsg grads leaving for higher paying states (wyo is one of the lowest paid) that they were paying the student's tuition for an agreement to work in wyo for 2 years. this is ridiculous and quite upsetting.
    In this post, I referred to the Oregon Center for Nursing's white paper on nurse education in Oregon. It says that while the number of nursing graduates has increased over 100% since 2001, faculty have only increased by 14%. We wouldn't work ourselves this hard for nothing. The current lack of job openings does not indicate there is no shortage; it indicates that employers consider nurses expendable when the economy is unfavorable. Watch those job openings surge again as the economy recovers. I believe the common thread in the Wyoming and Oregon stories is that nurses do not control our own profession; instead, employers who do not share our interests are in control. Nurses must change this or forever remain expendable at the whim of MDs and MBAs.

    One final point: anyone entering any profession ought to scope out the jobs available and run the other way if new graduates are not getting jobs. That is fundamental.
    Last edit by Teresag_CNS on Jun 28, '09 : Reason: added one final point
  13. by   anggelRN
    at my internship this summer, i attended a staff meeting held by our nurse manager. she said the nurses shouldn't complain because they should be happy to have a job. she also said the nursing staff may be getting a raise of 1 or 2 percent, if they get a raise at all. the hospital is no longer matching their contributions to their 401k's indefinitely. staff shouldn't complain about not getting a break, and it's the nurse's responsibility to make sure he/she gets a break. at the end of the meeting she had the nerve to say management is sacrificing because even they are not giving themselves a raise. i am only a student, but nurses can and should have more say over their working conditions than this. not to say that they shouldn't be happy to have a job but that doesn't mean that you should be treated like children. especially when nurses are the backbone of a hospital. it's not going to take one nurse to bring about change but if nurses are willing to take jobs in bad working conditions, then no one will see the need for change. until the culture of nursing change and conditions improve vastly, there will always be a shortage of bedside nurses. because honestly, who wants to take that crap? a lot of people graduate, see how the conditions are, and then go right back into school to get far away from bedside nursing. this is especially true when people only go through clinicals and have not had an internship in a hospital like i have.

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