UCSF Nurse Picketing

  1. http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/153233.php

    Protesting what they call a "dangerous and frightening" reduction in medical resources, Registered Nurses from UCSF will picket their hospital this Wednesday, calling on administrators to immediately withdraw their proposal to increase patient loads for nurses by 25 to 100 percent.


    This issue about relief nurses. I find this frightening that there will be more and more cuts as time goes on.
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  3. by   lindarn
    Quote from Alexk49
    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/153233.php

    Protesting what they call a "dangerous and frightening" reduction in medical resources, Registered Nurses from UCSF will picket their hospital this Wednesday, calling on administrators to immediately withdraw their proposal to increase patient loads for nurses by 25 to 100 percent.


    This issue about relief nurses. I find this frightening that there will be more and more cuts as time goes on.
    What happened to staffing ratios?

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington
  4. by   HonestRN
    What I find frightening is that more nurses aren't willing to picket and take a stand against unsafe hospital practices. That a lot of nurses already are not getting their breaks and lunches and won't stand up to hospital administration to insure their rights. That more nurses won't protest unsafe staffing. That is what is truly frightening to me.

    As long as nurses don't unite and take a stand these practices will continue. Unite nurses!!!!
  5. by   FireStarterRN
    I have never heard of designated "break relief nurses". Wherever I've worked we nurses have covered for one another as a rule. When I worked in a small hospital ICU the nursing supervisor would sometimes help cover lunches.

    Where I currently work on telemetry we have a lunch partner. This works out fine.
  6. by   sjt9721
    Quote from FireStarterRN
    I have never heard of designated "break relief nurses". Wherever I've worked we nurses have covered for one another as a rule. When I worked in a small hospital ICU the nursing supervisor would sometimes help cover lunches.

    Where I currently work on telemetry we have a lunch partner. This works out fine.
    California has mandated ratios. So when you go to lunch, your lunch partner is breaking the rule by having too many patients. The lunch-relief/break-relief nurses are there to maintain the ratios during those times. (That's my understanding of it, anyway...)
  7. by   c_beshore_rn
    I mean this with love and true ignorance because in podunk MO we don't do the picket thing.....Who takes care of all those patients while your on strike????
  8. by   squirt2008
    I have very mixed emotions regarding Nurses going on strike. If auto makers go on strike cars are not being made/asssembled......if Nurses go on strike human lives are on the line. I totally understand the nurse/patient ratio argument. I just struggle with this issue.
  9. by   awhitt001
    I'm confused too. I lived in CA 1995-1997 and while there was a 911 dispatcher / operator. One of the things that I clearly remember was that even though we were all in a mandated civil servent union, we were under no circumstances permitted to go on strike - if we did, we were fired. We even had to sign papers that we understood and agreed to this when we were hired. I had no problems signing the papers because it only made sense to me -- 911 staff is needed 24/7 with no interuptions in service.

    How is it that nursing staff is not under the same obligation? Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying that increasing patient ratios is OK, but in reality, when the nurses are on strike, the patients don't have coverage either.

    I know it's a sticky situation, the nurses are trying to ensure that the patients are properly being taken care of, and historically, strikes get action from the employers. However, IMHO, I think this is something that would better be addressed though the legislature (government regs on ratios) and public opinion (getting on TV news, etc.)

    And as to public opinion -- striking nurses looks so BAD, BAD, BAAAAADDDD to the general public. To be honest, until I started school, even I couldn't understand why there was "so many nurses" needed at the hosp., clinic, etc. I had NO IDEA what all was required for patient care, documentation, etc. I can just imagine what the general population is thinking when they hear "nurses are striking over ratio changes from 1:4 to 1:5". I just bet they're saying "aw... boo, hoo, hoo.... those overpaid, whiney, spoiled nurses"..... that is NOT the impression that we want, but due to lack of knowledge, that IS the impression people will / do have.

    Think about it, (for currently practicing nurses) how many times have you heard statements such as "anybody can do you you're doing" or any of the various comments you can read in some of the "vent" thread on AllNurses.com? People just don't know. And as a previous "general population" myself, the attitudes and comments heard by me from doctors about nurses just reinforces the opinion that 1) anybody can be a nurse 2) nurses don't do much other than take your blood, bring you water, and sit at the desk chatting on the phone (not my opinion, these are comments that I've actually heard come out of doctor's mouths).

    If the head of the nursing union there, or a group of say charge nurses were to approach the local news and ask for a sit down interview or even a discussion panel, I bet the news would jump at it. Public opinion carries alot of weight both in politics (getting the legislation) and in business (getting administration / management to back down).
  10. by   squirt2008
    :bowingpur Well said. Unfortunately the public relys so heavily on the media to "let them know what is going on"....I think nurses should take advantage of this notion.
    I am sure the only media coverage regarding this issue is short news stories with videos of nurses yelling into bullhorns, picketing and administration saying 'we have plenty of nurses to cover the nurses that are on strike'.....I can tell you that if I was the general public, I would not want to support the nurses that are on strike with that kind of coverage.
  11. by   SlightlyMental_RN
    From reading the article--it doesn't say anything about "going on a strike"--only about RNs picketing at their hospital (basically holding a rally). It sounds like off-duty RNs are going to picket. I could be wrong, tho'.
  12. by   squirt2008
    Thanks for the information. Makes me 'feel better' that off-duty would "rally".
  13. by   elkpark
    This is a topic that has come up before on this site. Apparently, a lot of nurses have the idea that nurses "striking" means that nurses would just drop what they're doing and walk out of the hospital on the spot without warning. That's not how it works. When nurses do go on strike, they notify the hospital administration well in advance (days or even weeks) that that is the plan, so that hospital administration has time to discharge clients who can be discharged, consider transferring clients to other facilities, make arrangements for coverage, etc. We all know that there are plenty of nurses "out there" who are happy to cross a picket line and work as scabs ; also, the multiple layers of nursing administration actually have to get out from behind their desks and do something useful for a change, like actually take care of sick people ...

    People don't end up lying in bed, alone on the hospital units, with no one to care for them.
  14. by   squirt2008
    It is a tricky thing, because although I struggle with it being 'okay' for Nurses to strike, I would not cross a picket line. I guess it is because I have been a RN for so long, I think it would be a slap in the face of fellow RNs to cross.
    I appreciate your input.

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