Surge in RN retirements feared once economy rebounds - page 2

surge in rn retirements feared once economy rebounds more california nurses are delaying retirement because of the poor economy, reducing the shortage of nurses short-term but still leaving a... Read More

  1. by   FireStarterRN
    Quote from cxg174
    My hospital pays $21/hr for my 24 years experience (top pay). Be careful what you say- $40/hr is unheard of around here. It makes nurses look like they are well (even over) paid when they are not. I only make $2/hr more than I did in 1998. And yes, I am in home health but we are on the same pay scale as the rest of the hospital. I think starting pay is about $16/hr.
    Why should I 'be careful' in saying what the wage scale is in my area? It makes all of us more aware to have these matters out in the open.

    Perhaps the average cost of a home is much less in your area though. The average cost of a 3 bedroom home in the county where my hospital is is $216,000.
  2. by   oramar
    I would say that the statement the initial post gives is accurate. How many more years can people drag their poor bodies thru this gauntlet. If it is a heavy flu year a lot of experienced nurses will say, "that is it". Heavy flu years are even more hellish than the rest of the time.
  3. by   DeepFriedRN
    I make over $40/hr, and I've been a nurse for just under 7 years now. I'm in So. Cal though, and the cost of living is ridiculous. The reason I keep this job, however, is because of the insurance. I pay nothing to insure me, my hubby and my 2 kids. You can't beat it. But bedside is about killing me, and I'm only 35. I would definitely like to move out of bedside nursing when the right opportunity presents itself. Since I myself am not even close to retiring and want to get away from the bedside, I can totally see loss of bedside nurses being a potential problem when the economy recovers.
  4. by   Platypus
    Quote from rn/writer
    Nursing might not stand out as far as age, but it most certainly does stand out in the areas of physical and emotional stress. And it stands out in being one of the few careers where a person can significantly alter their job requirements, for example, by going from bedside care to home health or utilization review (which, while still demanding jobs, usually require less physical stamina).

    I'll bet few other professional-level jobs require regularly working 12-hour shifts, managing dangerous patient loads, and going lengthy stretches without breaks. There are many aspects of bedside nursing that become more and more difficult as we age. Hence the attraction to trading floor nursing (where the shortage is most likely to register most severely) for desk or clinic jobs that are not quite as punishing.

    When there is a reliable rebound in the economy, I have no trouble believing that many older nurses will beat a hasty retreat for the door. And good percentage of the younger ones will either leave or cut back as well.

    This article is right to sound the alarm now. Hope somebody acts on these concerns before they become emergencies.
    "This article is right to sound the alarm now. Hope somebody acts on these concerns before they become emergencies."

    I think this is the 2nd article I have read on this site that sounds the alarm. One was suggesting hospitals start training new nurses so when the economy improves, there will be some experienced nurses available.

    Does anyone know how much of a toll the new rule of the govt NOT paying for Hospital aquired infections / injuries is affecting hospitals. Are hospitals really losing so much money, that they cannot afford new nurses?
  5. by   casper1
    I'm 57 I don't plan on retiring for another 9 years. hopefully I will be able to work part time after that. i work in acute care in a large hospital. I don't feel I am any less able to do the work than my younger counterparts. The volutility of the stockmarket makes it very hard to plan a financial future. Now that hospitals are no longer having to pay sign on bonuses maybes it time to invest in equipment that will help in lifting and`will save not only older nurses from further back injuries, but will protect younger nurses from experiencing many of the lifting injurys that have plague their older counterparts.
  6. by   casper1
    Quote from FireStarterRN
    I predict, however, that once we go to nationalized health insurance that many nurses will go to per diem. A lot of nurses stay more for the health insurance than anything.
    That's true many Women are married to older men, who will reach eligiblity to medicare before them. This puts them at risk of inadequate coverage if they do/t keep working.
  7. by   nursemarion
    Quote from RN2bMBAnext
    "This article is right to sound the alarm now. Hope somebody acts on these concerns before they become emergencies."

    I think this is the 2nd article I have read on this site that sounds the alarm. One was suggesting hospitals start training new nurses so when the economy improves, there will be some experienced nurses available.

    Does anyone know how much of a toll the new rule of the govt NOT paying for Hospital aquired infections / injuries is affecting hospitals. Are hospitals really losing so much money, that they cannot afford new nurses?
    Part of what I do is infection control monitoring and I will tell you that hospital acquired infections are a massive problem. The hospitals know it. Medicare knows it. All efforts to try and reduce it have not been successful enough- how many end up with MRSA? How many end up with C-Dif? It is terrible. In desperation they have decided to force the hospitals to take stronger action by refusing to pay for what could have been preventable causes of morbidity and mortality. It is sad that it has come to this point, but it is time. Two out of three of my own family members who have been hospitalized had these type of infections as a result. I myself went to the ER last year with a cat bite- infected and draining, and no one who cared for me wore gloves. Not the doc, not the nurse, not the other nurse who started my IV. It is my OWN HOSPITAL where I work! I reported it later to my boss who told infection control.

    It is time to get creative and look for better ways to prevent infection whether it be UV lights or more intensive monitoring and training or whatever. I know hospitals are busy places, but when I visited my family member in one of the major trauma centers in Pittsburgh and saw suction and ventilator tubing dragging on the floor I knew that this is why everyone gets sick while they are in the hospital!
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Jun 20, '09
  8. by   pagandeva2000
    If I were closer to retirement and the economy gets better, you can bet your buns I would cut out while I have strength in my body. I am constantly seeing inadequate training, constant fear of law suits, an exaggerated emphasis on customer service and fatigue...all that can, as an earlier poster said equate to dog years. Just because a person may not have a chronic illness does not mean that their quality of life has been reduced.

    I'd take the first thing smokin'..
  9. by   Moogie
    Quote from FireStarterRN
    I predict, however, that once we go to nationalized health insurance that many nurses will go to per diem. A lot of nurses stay more for the health insurance than anything.
    I think you're absolutely right.

    It is shameful, however, that while some nurses remain on the job primarily for the health insurance, others remain uninsured. I don't think any of the CNAs with whom I worked in a nursing home were insured. Several put refilling prescriptions or tending to medical needs because they could not afford the insurance the facility offered and could not pay their medical bills on their own.
  10. by   Daly City RN
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

    I am a 52-year old RN who worked for 27.5 years in a busy county-owned trauma center in the San Francisco Bay Area, California. I am fortunate enough to have survived all those crazy years relatively healthy but the stress of the job finally forced me to retire last year. I'm receiving a lifetime monthly pension from the county enough to pay all of my modest monthly bills.

    I'm currently working as a part time RN, working in a stress-free job 1-2 days a week to keep me busy and to have cash for me and my spouse's frequent weekend trips.

    You only live once.

    Try to enjoy life while you are still capable of doing it because...

    You only live once.

    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
  11. by   oramar
    Quote from casper1
    That's true many Women are married to older men, who will reach eligiblity to medicare before them. This puts them at risk of inadequate coverage if they do/t keep working.
    My hubby picked age 66 1/2 for his retirement date. That is not an arbitrary number. That is the date I turn 65 and qualify for medicare. Isn't he a prince. We could qualify if he retired right now thru his union for health insurance. But we would have to pick up a large portion of the cost. It is a lot cheaper to wait until we qualify for medicare. That is only four years away. I am telling this story just to show how people plan their life around health insurance. Getting, keeping, worrying about what would happen if they lost it.
  12. by   nurseneedaname
    I wish obama would life the retrogression and hire nurses abroad.

    If you wish to comment or post your opinion, go ahead and reply.
  13. by   FireStarterRN
    Quote from casper1
    That's true many Women are married to older men, who will reach eligiblity to medicare before them. This puts them at risk of inadequate coverage if they do/t keep working.
    I've seen that scenario many times.

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