Study on recession's effect on nursing shortage - page 2

The frustrating thing is that it seems to me that the hospitals are just not hiring enough nurses; I think the nursing shortage is still there. This is purely anecdotal, but my son was hospitalized 3... Read More

  1. by   AKSkier
    I live in Alaska (therefore AK skier). Normally things slow down for agency work in summer. Usually Alaska is looking for nurses. I know some of the hospitals are still hiring. I think I am going to go apply to work prn at one of the hospitals. Agency is always the first cancelled since we are more expensive.

    But someone told me that a one of the cities in Idaho did not hire any new grads this year. I was surprised.

    A friend in Texas said things have not slowed down there. They are keeping busy.
  2. by   rpric7990
    New Grads were turned away this year in Maryland near Baltimore
  3. by   Hushdawg
    I spoke with the owner of a staffing firm yesterday and he is saying that there are job demands coming in but from different places than normal. He services 15 states and he says that all his hospitals that are normally not hiring are now hiring.

    He also informed me that in first quarter of 2009 more than 27,000 NEW RNs were hired.

    Apparently the jobs are out there, just not in places that people are normally looking.

    FYI, according to an immigration attorney I know, the H1B visas are opening up in the Philippines with a start date of October 1 because the recession is keeping all other industries from hiring overseas and therefore the visas are being under-issued rather than being over-quota like normal.
  4. by   phelan26
    Being a nurse for over 30 years, I have seen many changes in the way health care is delivered.
    I spent the majority of those years in an acute care setting/staff nurse in a hospital.
    Being 'shamed' into working overtime by your supervisors, was a common practice. Bordered on blackmail-but that was the way it was.
    Administration began to impliment the staffing grid during my years as a staff nurse in the hospital setting. Whoever came up with this system, and the parameters, have a very loose grasp on realty.
    The nurse to patient ratios, that would 'allow' you to have an additional staff person was ridiculous/still is. This was one of the main reasons I left floor nursing/hospital nursing. My heart will always lie with the trauma, the adreneline rushes of emergency nursing/surgery.
    I transferred to an outpatient/ambulatory surgery center/clinic setting. The staffing grids followed to this type of clinical setting as well. Administration pushes for more productivity with less staff. Does not matter that you do not get a lunch break or any type of break during your work day.
    Now--the nursing staff was 'encouraged' to start working four 10 hour shifts a week, to cut back on overtime.
    The demands of a clinic nurse, are different that those of a hospital nurse. The mentality is that the clinic nurse does not work as hard a hospital nurse. Having done both jobs--this is an utter and complete fallacy.
    Clinic nurses still are required to use their brains just like hospital nurses.
    Patients can be just as rude and demanding in a clinic setting as a hospital setting...sometimes worse.
    I work in a clinic that specializes in the care and treatment of patients with chronic pain. This is a probably the hardest type of patient, that I have ever worked with in my nursing career.
    Staffing grids were supposed to make you work more efficient--so nurses were told. In reality, these grids wear a nurse or any health care worker into the ground--make you want to leave the health field.
    If the people who design these grids, actually had to work within the grid guidelines themselves for just one busy week, maybe things would change?
    The bottom line is always money.
    When young people ask me if they should go into the nursing field---I discourage them from doing so. I tell them the truth--no sugar coating, what they can expect. If they can see beyond all this and still want to go into the nursing field---God bless them.
    I went into nursing, to help people/to educate people on how to live a healthier, safer life. That has not changed after 30 some years. I have helped many people and that is a reward unto itself. My rose colored glasses came off a long time ago though. I like what I do--it just gets so very frustrating, when you can't do your job, because of the restraints of the staffing grid systems that are in place.
  5. by   shalva
    I have been an RN for 34 yrs., and from day one always was told of the "Nursing Shortage". Hospitals have ALWAYS worked with "short staffing" on purpose, to save money. Many incidents have ALREADY happened and nothing has changed in 34 yrs.
  6. by   pednursedeb
    I've been with one hospital for 23 years. They have recently changed their staffing grid. We get less staff, nursing and auxillary for a certain # of patients. We even send people home for low census. The low census has really been harder on the CNA's and unit secretary's than the nurses.
    I do think people are having less elective surgeries. Our census tends to drop in the summer too.
    I don't think there was any nursing feedback put into the new grid. It was just for a money saver.
    I know times are hard, but my concern is patient safety. They add more work with less nurses and you are putting patient safety on the line.
    I hope this is short term and it improves. We'll see.
  7. by   Woodenpug
    "The low census has really been harder on the CNA's and unit secretary's than the nurses. "

    Just a minor point. Fewer CNA's and Fewer unit secretary's makes things harder on the RN. We all share the pain as to ability to do our jobs. But financially, you're right. It probably would be more cost/production efficient to send the RN home.
  8. by   tlwkaw
    Well they are not hiring new nurse in my area and everyone in my class that just graduated is having a difficult time finding a job!!!So maybe there isn't a nursing shortage after all.
  9. by   Ginger's Mom
    The predicted nursing shortage is based on current medical and nursing practices and the fact nurses are aging. It the same light I hear Medicare is going bankrupt in 8 years. Do you really think that the Medicare we know is going to exist the same in the future.

    My predictions for the next 10-20 years, the Medicare benefit will be cut, hospitalizations will be shorter and SNF under Medicare Benefit will be limited. Home care visits will be limited also. The need will be for Advanced Practice Nurses to act as MD extenders.

    Assisted Living will grow and nursing home beds will be decreased. The older nurses will work longer.

    MD offices tend to hire LPN not RNs.
  10. by   Ginger's Mom
    Quote from Hushdawg
    I spoke with the owner of a staffing firm yesterday and he is saying that there are job demands coming in but from different places than normal. He services 15 states and he says that all his hospitals that are normally not hiring are now hiring.

    He also informed me that in first quarter of 2009 more than 27,000 NEW RNs were hired.

    Apparently the jobs are out there, just not in places that people are normally looking.

    FYI, according to an immigration attorney I know, the H1B visas are opening up in the Philippines with a start date of October 1 because the recession is keeping all other industries from hiring overseas and therefore the visas are being under-issued rather than being over-quota like normal.
    Isn't that what everyone has been saying ? Most non traditional places other than hospitals look for experienced nurses ( home care, clinics, outpatient surgery, Home infusion therapy, insurance companies) I believe that is why new grads are having a hard time finding positions. I wonder how many RN positions have been eliminated, I know many nurses who have lost their jobs. With California bankrupt and will be reducing reimbursements, I would venture that many RN positions will be cut in CA.

    All I see for positions in hospitals are for specialized nurses or management positions.
  11. by   Shenanigans
    And you can bet your arse while they don't hire more nurses for the floor they have a stink load hired to sit on their backsides pushing paper around a big desk and giving us more papers to strain our eyes on for things as mundane as a smoking cessation request form for a non-smoker. >_<'
  12. by   seablitz.llc
    Perhaps recession is dependent on geographical location its economic status. Here in New York City, three acute hospitals closed not because of economic pressure of the current time but they have been doing poorly prior to the current recession. What happen to the nurses. Many relocated out of state and those who stayed got jobs immediately because of their specialized skills and opening of new beds by hospitals who are receiving the population of the recently closed hospitals.
    Nursing shortage - it will be around for a great while because of the aging of the current nurses. In addition, the nursing profession became so dynamic and no longer dedicated to hospitals, nursing homes, outpatient services, etc. There are so many new roles and doors opening for nurses, including many non-clinical related work such as clinical documentations specialist, case management, DRG validator or coder, IT jobs, and even administrative jobs not related to clinical nursing. There is a growing sense that the healthcare industry needs to adjust to the so called nursing shortage and the problem of healthcare cost. Many expert look for providers to change or come out with a new methodology of care. The question is, do we really need a new methodology of care or should we look and evaluate our past and go back to basic, that is, taking care of our own. The complexities of our current family structure and responsibility may not be suitable to family care engagement, but what would be the best for those who needs care... just a thought.
  13. by   karenchad
    in NJ the situation in no different. i've seen the web posted nursing positions drastically reduced

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