Study: Nursing sees biggest work force jump in 30 years

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    [color=#ec101a]study: nursing sees biggest work force jump in 30 years
    [color=#ec101a]nurses who left the profession before the recession are returning, helping to alleviate a decade-long shortage, researchers reported. from 2007 to 2008, almost 250,000 nurses entered the work force, an 18% gain and the biggest two-year increase in the past 30 years, according to a study in the journal health affairs. about half of the increase came among nurses over age 50, but in 2008 there were one-third more nurses ages 21 to 34 with children under 6. the wall street journal
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    16 Comments

  3. by   Tweety
    Which confirms the theory that there were always plenty of nurses, just many whom didnt' want to work......for a variety of reasons.
  4. by   Ginger's Mom
    http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/...619_970033.htm

    Business Week has an interesting article discussing the nursing shortage.
  5. by   oramar
    Quote from Alexk49
    http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/...619_970033.htm

    Business Week has an interesting article discussing the nursing shortage.
    Thanks, very interesting article. I know that all these new grads and others that can't get jobs will not be pleased to read that there is talk of loosening rules on immigration.
  6. by   mochabean
    "hospital administrators such as william r. moore in el centro, calif., a sparsely populated town 100 miles east of san diego, see the wexler bill as a potential life raft. moore is chief human resources director at [color=#007cd5]el centro regional medical center, a 135-bed public hospital that typically has 30 open positions for [color=#007cd5]registered nurses (rns). while it's hard to lure nurses from nearby big cities (san diego is 100 miles west), moore says he could quickly recruit dozens of eager, qualified nurses from the philippines if the government allocated more visas. "all we want is temporary relief," says moore. "let us get a group of experienced rn hires from the philippines, and we won't ask for more." "


    has anyone applied there?
  7. by   tothepointeLVN
    I'll move to El Centro. I think honestly many people do not know the opportunities available just outside of the big cities. Decent wages and maybe a pony would be all I would ask.
  8. by   DeLana_RN
    Can they make up there minds? It seems like every week there's a new article about either (a) a continued nursing shortage or (b) no nursing shortage. Even RN magazine declared in its April 2009 (!) issue that there is a serious nursing shortage and that hospitals are doing all kinds of things to try to attract nurses (hmm... did they mean to print this in 2007?)

    Anyway, I get tired of reading about this as I'm waiting on a call back from the hospital I applied to last week :icon_roll

    DeLana

    P.S. Hmm, nice, a lot of 50-something nurses are returning to the job ---> conclusion: shortage over ... hmm, just how long do they think these pre-retirement age nurses are going to stay on the job?! Wildcat days, though, for the hospitals - I guess they plan to deal with the shortage a decade from now (or ever?!)
  9. by   AtomicWoman
    This quote from the hospital administrator made my blood boil and run cold, all at the same time:

    To them [nurses from the Philippines] the U.S. "is the land of milk and honey, and the streets are paved in gold," says Moore. "They're not so particular."

    Argh! Let's all leave comments on that article and write to our senators, explaining the the "shortage" of nurses.
  10. by   hope3456
    Quote from mochabean
    "hospital administrators such as william r. moore in el centro, calif., a sparsely populated town 100 miles east of san diego, see the wexler bill as a potential life raft. moore is chief human resources director at [color=#007cd5]el centro regional medical center, a 135-bed public hospital that typically has 30 open positions for [color=#007cd5]registered nurses (rns). while it's hard to lure nurses from nearby big cities (san diego is 100 miles west), moore says he could quickly recruit dozens of eager, qualified nurses from the philippines if the government allocated more visas. "all we want is temporary relief," says moore. "let us get a group of experienced rn hires from the philippines, and we won't ask for more." "


    has anyone applied there?

    the keyword is experienced!!! the administrator wants a group of 'experienced rn's from the phillipines.' he probably has a stack of 100 apps from new grad rn's lying on his desk.
  11. by   John Alexis
    No theory I see confirmed... 80 million baby boomers entering the healthcare arena as we speak and Labor and Statistics has us as the #1 workforce shortage area for our lifetimes. Where on earth do you see an abundant supply of nurses. I see an abundunt supply of green, new orientees being walloped in the head by the most sick and highest acuity patient loads nurses have ever had to take care of. No wonder there is so much turnover in the first year out from these newbies. Crisis continues....jobs for all.....good opportunities if you are diverse and strong enough to handle the environment.
  12. by   michelleernurse
    i have several friends that always worked prn for 2 sometimes 3 different hospitals so they could create their own schedule because they had small children, kids in school, etc.. they needed the flexible scheduling to work with their kids school schedules. these same nurses now have taken full time jobs because their kids have graduated and now they need college money. nursing scheduling for so many years was very flexible due to the need to fill open slots. today, not so flexible because most positions have been filled. everything goes in cycles.... we will eventually will make our way back to job vacancies. i have seen a lot over the last 16 years.
  13. by   AZ_LPN_8_26_13
    Quote from AtomicWoman
    This quote from the hospital administrator made my blood boil and run cold, all at the same time:

    To them [nurses from the Philippines] the U.S. "is the land of milk and honey, and the streets are paved in gold," says Moore. "They're not so particular."

    Argh! Let's all leave comments on that article and write to our senators, explaining the the "shortage" of nurses.
    It's obvious that this is all about money. People who do the hiring are looking at $$$$$ and absolutely nothing else. I've never been a big advocate of government action in the past, but I think that this is what it's going to take. Spare me the "big bad government boogieman" talk. I think that the alternative (Third-World wages and working conditions, with no jobs for Americans) is far far worse. I'm not normally a get on your soapbox type person, but this is something we need to be loud, noisy, and unceasing about. The people who control this just aren't listening IMO......
  14. by   AZ_LPN_8_26_13
    Quote from mochabean
    "hospital administrators such as william r. moore in el centro, calif., a sparsely populated town 100 miles east of san diego, see the wexler bill as a potential life raft. moore is chief human resources director at [color=#007cd5]el centro regional medical center, a 135-bed public hospital that typically has 30 open positions for [color=#007cd5]registered nurses (rns). while it's hard to lure nurses from nearby big cities (san diego is 100 miles west), moore says he could quickly recruit dozens of eager, qualified nurses from the philippines if the government allocated more visas. "all we want is temporary relief," says moore. "let us get a group of experienced rn hires from the philippines, and we won't ask for more." "


    has anyone applied there?

    i'd be willing to bet that if they tried and really put out the word, they could get people to move to el centro, ca. you'd have the amenities of small town life, and being only 100 miles (i'm a native of the u.s. midwest/great plains - 100 miles is nothing) from san diego, you are relatively close to the big city..... looks to me more like they had this idea in mind from the get-go, and are looking for ways to justify it. somebody needs to call them out on it imo

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