Staffs full, nurses struggle for work - page 5

The media seems to be catching on... When Katharine Barron enrolled in Boston College's school of nursing in 2005, everyone - family, friends, college officials - assured her hospitals would be... Read More

  1. by   AtomicWoman
    Quote from denverrn921
    new grads---take the night shift; stop begging for er/or/l&d positions without any med/surg time. yes, you have to work weekends and holidays. yes, there are stories of new grads getting these jobs but as in any other career; it's not what you know, but who you know.
    argh! this is what so many new grads are talking about! they are willing to take any job, any shift, and they are still not getting offers in many parts of the country.
  2. by   AtomicWoman
    Quote from brian
    Just thought you all might want to read this: New Grads, a few words of encouragement
    Brian, I read your article and really appreciate it. But when I tried to reply to a post, I was told I don't have access to the page. I am guessing it is because I am not a premium member. Any way to move the article to a general access forum?

    Thanks again.
  3. by   Skeletor
    Quote from Not_A_Hat_Person
    Over the years, I've learned that if no one wants to live or work in a certain area, there's probably a good reason. Not everyone can, or wants to, live in the middle of nowhere. Being nonwhite can also complicate things.
    So can being white...
  4. by   linzz
    Although I am Canadian, my father lives in Pennsylvania so I hear from him how tough things are. I am so sad to hear this for a few reasons, one being that my spouse's job is very dependent on the U.S. economy and the other is that I visit the U.S.A. at least twice a year, and I think it is a great country that used to have so much opportunity.

    I hope every day that things get better for everyone (esp. nurses). This poor economy just can't last forever. JMO.
  5. by   Teebtong
    This sort of a situation should come as no surprise to anyone who may be a career-switcher or second-degree RN; this is the reality of every other field aside from perhaps medicine and law.

    There's no guarantee you're going to get a job at the end of school, no matter what you study. I think there are a lot of people wanted to become nurses because they read it on some silly Yahoo News countdown about how it has "great hours, great pay, plentiful jobs"; it should have read "has same problems as every other profession".

    You're going to have managers that you want to kill. "Customers" can have nasty attitudes too. You may get stuck with crap shifts because lazy coworkers aren't carrying their weight. You're going to have to be cut-throat in order to move ahead.

    My point is just that there is no such thing as a guaranteed job at the end of college. Not for anyone. Unfortunately this means that you may have to wait. But really, would you be any better off NOT being an RN? My dilemma was that I hated my job. I was nervous to go to nursing school because I thought "What if I don't get a job? What if I don't make enough to cover my loans from my BA on top of my BSN?" Then a friend asked me "and all of these would be better w/o going to nursing school because....?" He had a point. If things are bad now, how is getting more education going to make it any worse? So things may not be perfect; they're better than they were before.

    Keep you head up and realize you're not the only one. That's all I can say. :-)
  6. by   stephenfnielsen
    Quote from Teebtong
    .

    Keep you head up and realize you're not the only one. That's all I can say. :-)
    My wife and I will be graduating in June and I can't think of a degree that I would rather have then my ADN, not to mention that combined we will have about as much debt as money in the bank thanks to attending a lowly CC. Unfortunately a lot of my classmates will not be getting jobs, however, my wife and I, and all of the other people that have received job offers to this point have either worked as CNA's or have done extensive externships above and beyond the average student.

    I have worked weekend nights as a CNA, first in a nursing home, then in a hospital, not because I liked the job, not because I needed the money, but because for the last three years I didn't believe the hype and knew it would be hard to find a job if I did it any other way. A lot of people were blind sided by this and didn't put the footwork in during those years leading up to graduation. PLEASE... I'm not commenting on any particular person on this forum, this is just what I've seen in my area.
  7. by   canoehead
    I graduated when and where there were no jobs. I stayed casual for a few years (which made me an experienced RN), and the experience gave me enough confidence that I was able to move to where they had jobs, and I got full time in a specialty I wanted.

    No one has mentioned taking casual work temporarily to gain experience, and some good work references.

    Remember that a few years from now you will be the experienced RN everyone wants and doors will open for you. In some cases you need to just put in the time at a job you don't like to get to what you do like.

    I'm working on the east coast of Canada now, we need nurses, and Canadian hospitals count for great experience when you return to the US.
  8. by   Not_A_Hat_Person
    Quote from stephenfnielsen
    My wife and I will be graduating in June and I can't think of a degree that I would rather have then my ADN, not to mention that combined we will have about as much debt as money in the bank thanks to attending a lowly CC. Unfortunately a lot of my classmates will not be getting jobs, however, my wife and I, and all of the other people that have received job offers to this point have either worked as CNA's or have done extensive externships above and beyond the average student.

    I have worked weekend nights as a CNA, first in a nursing home, then in a hospital, not because I liked the job, not because I needed the money, but because for the last three years I didn't believe the hype and knew it would be hard to find a job if I did it any other way. A lot of people were blind sided by this and didn't put the footwork in during those years leading up to graduation. PLEASE... I'm not commenting on any particular person on this forum, this is just what I've seen in my area.
    In Boston, being a CNA is no guarantee that your facility will hire you as an RN. At the hospital where I volunteered, the day a CAN passed their boards was the day they lost their job.
  9. by   stephenfnielsen
    Quote from Not_A_Hat_Person
    In Boston, being a CNA is no guarantee that your facility will hire you as an RN. At the hospital where I volunteered, the day a CAN passed their boards was the day they lost their job.
    I completely hear what you are saying. I've even heard people go so far as saying that admissions to a prestigious school here in Oregon prefers that students do NOT have experience as a CNA. For me personally while I worked as a CNA I attended every staff meeting, volunteered for all sorts things, and as politely and friendly as I could, stayed in contact with my manager updating her on my education status and expressing genuine interest in working there when I graduated. I basically treated the whole process like one long job interview. I'm not saying that it works that way for everyone, but I feel like that was a big factor in getting me hired.
  10. by   Aaron86
    this is so true. the sad part is that every hospital i have done clinical in has been short staffed to some degree. one hospital was mostly staffed with travel nurses and the nurses were all working overtime. some were even stacking 4 or 5 12-hour shifts a week and there are still understaffing issues at times!


    on the flip side of this - all the hospitals in the northern virginia/ dc metro area seem to be in a hiring freeze.
    gee, i can't *imagine* why these hospitals can't afford to hire new grads when they have travel rns pulling double overtime!

    there was a nursing job fair on my campus back in january and all the recruiters basically said "we would love to have you, but we can't offer you a job in february .... of 2010!" how do i get by for 9 months without a job and student loans accruing interest? there might very well be new grad nurses on unemployment if this keeps up.


    the washington post tells a similar story as that boston newspaper- the reason new grads can't find the jobs they want isn't because nursing shortage is "solved". it’s because all the experienced nurses who would have retired or already have retired are coming back into the workplace since their 401ks have been wiped out.

    this is really scary for me since i am set to graduate in may this year and i already don't feel nearly as prepared as i would like. i can't imagine what shortages will be like when the economy turns around and older nurses go back into retirement. those new grads who can't get jobs right away might move on to non-hospital jobs and those that do come back will be seriously underprepared for the conditions they will have to work under.

    on a side note: i really really hate my university registrar's office for messing up and losing my transcripts (5 times!) and forcing me to sit out a year for my seat in the nursing program. the graduates last year all had no trouble naming their specialty and picking the shifts they wanted. hospitals were bending over backwards to accomidate them it seemed....now,not so much
    Last edit by Aaron86 on Apr 21, '09
  11. by   sarasidnic
    Nurses are still in short supply. Keep in mind that nurses are putting off their retirement either for medical coverage as well as the poor economy. I think this is one of those situations that we have no choice but to wait it out.
    Healthcare facilities are going to be saturated with the baby boom generation. They are at that place where age related illnesses tend to start creeping up on them and there is nowhere near enough nurses to handle the influx of so many people. However, we have to hang out in limbo for awhile and it's a scary place to be.
  12. by   shrinky
    Instead of going west, come to the warm, sunny south where we still need nurses. We are not rel big cities but you can get the experience that you crave and we do hire new grads. This is a cycle that I have seen often in my 42 years as a nurse. We have had so many shortages then layoffs, then a shortage, then a layoff. When I started in nursing I worked the evening shift, yes, we had three shifts back then. I was the only nurse on the unit of 35 patients with 2 nurses' aides to help. Was I scared, you bet. That was a shortage and that was before the two year programs were in full swing and the three year programs were phasing out. We older nurses will be retiring soon and guess what? There will definitely be a real shortage then. The rural communities need help, and though we may not have a glamorous life, we meet some pretty awesome people here. I grew up in Chicago and went to school there so I haven't always been a small town girl. I work between Charleston, SC and Columbia so there is life within driving distance. Pay is not as much as in CA probably but neither is the cost of living. Anyway, good luck to all and if you can't find a job, consider the south.
  13. by   mattsgirl
    I can't believe some of the comments I am reading. I am one of "those" students with over $100,000 in debt and 2 more years to go until I get my DNP. No, I do not think it's a waste of money, nor do I appreciate the comments that my BSN/DNP education isn't worth the money. Oh, so only an MD is worth that amount of money? Um, no.
    Seattle has a nursing shortage. There are tons of jobs. I actually just turned down a job. And for the record, I didn't see some ad on yahoo that promised good wages/jobs if you become a nurse. I have been working on my degree since 2004, and have 8 years homecare experience as a CNA.
    Please stop stereotyping everyone!:angryfire

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