Recession is making nursing shortage worse - page 2

When the commencement ceremonies have concluded, the graduation parties are over, and the relatives have left town, many nursing graduates will wake up to an unexpected reality: a tough job market. ... Read More

  1. by   pennyaline
    Quote from misplaced1
    What is this pandemic you keep talking about? My background is in biology research and I have not heard about this and don't understand why there would be a pandemic unless you are talking about bird flu or something becoming airbourn
    You silly. Of course the bird flu is airborne :wink2:

    Some are predicting that this spring's swine flu will repeat with greater virulence this coming fall or flu season. That prediction is based on the behavior of the 1917-1918 swine flu.

    There is very little realization of how often the swine flu actually rides through town. Most of the people I bring the subject up with are not at all aware that it was last here in the 1990s.
  2. by   shep1960
    Well Brian you have recieved a rather interesting and detailed report from my fellow nurses regarding what the recession is doing to the nursing profession. Our voices must be heard by the individuals running our government both at the state and federal level. I ask the new graduates to be patient and expand their network of nursing contacts so they can find the right job. Well I better get off of here. I have to go write my Senator and ask him what has he done today to help a nurse.
  3. by   Roy Fokker
    It took me atleast 6 months to land a job as a med/surg nurse and that was over 3 years ago.

    This 'tough' job market isn't 'new', IMHO.

    cheers,
  4. by   cardiacRN2006
    Good-maybe with the shortage coming back I might actually get appreciated and not be told how "lucky" I am to have a job.

    Maybe I might get a raise that year. Maybe I won't be told to 'suck it up'.

    Yes, maybe I'll actually get respected. And maybe the power will shift away from The Powers That Be and back to the nurses.
  5. by   karenchad
    lovelymo79 is right - I too am from the NJ/ Phila area and jobs for nurses are almost non existant- I have been unemployed for 2 months applied to evey job I can find- hospital, LTC, and some notraditional ones- alliance health care- ?research/telephonic, inventu- (pharm co wanting nurses to do those pesty little inservices that we all grumble about when we have to stop what we are doing in our units) no responses- My experience is all Hospital/ 30 years- med/surg/oncology/now telemetry(6 years) endoscopy(1 year) even ER holding. I thought I had my bases covered. Hospitals around me are dropping like flies/ clossing doors- in Phila I lost count- 2 hospital - one ?Keysone/chester- laid off 400, temple northeastern- in phases- / 200-300 nurses. Positions in the ones left are being eliminated. AND I DO NOT see any CEO's unemployed or even taking a cut in pay or their health insurance plans- any one know what a CEO's salary is or any of administrations' salary for that fact(NURSING and other wise)There's where they could save a few bucks, give it back to the nurses in the trenches. I signed up with agency and only got 1 shift in a month and a half. I wonder how much it cost us for Pres. Obama to take Michele out on the air forse 1 date? Just a thought.
  6. by   NICOLE4RC
    I'm a nursing student in the Philadelphia area. I don't know where I first heard this story, but I've been telling friends that also want to enter nursing the difficulties they may have getting in. I thought it was a recession proof job. Just goes to show you. Most of the hospitals in this area are in a hiring freeze. I'm fortunate to have a job with a suburban hospital that I've held for years as I've been attending nursing school. But, I'm afrain that when I leave this job to start clinicals I won't be able to return to the system.

    It's simply the worst news a person about to graduate could get.
  7. by   AZ_LPN_8_26_13
    Quote from oramar
    The shortage might come roaring back as soon this fall when the pandemic hits. I feel sorry for the people in the front lines because the US healthcare system can not handle a modest increase in demand let along a big one. The people that are going to feel the wrath of the public first will be bedside, especially EMS and ER. They will be in no way responsible for sever shortage of services but they will feel the rage. The only good thing about it will be that people will finally realize healthcare should be about care not profit.
    I'm glad that I work for a hospital that's part of a not-for-profit healthcare organization. I personally believe that healthcare should be about patient care and needs first, not making money. Patient health needs should be the primary consideration in health decisions, not money. Basic, essential healthcare should be availible to all citizens of this nation - rich, poor, or in-between. I would happily and proudly pay more taxes to support genuine healthcare, and maybe a bit less could be spent on things like "bridges to nowhere", or studies on why kids fall off of tricycles. I do not like, and do not agree with a "customer" approach to healthcare. Most people don't "bargain shop" around when they are in an accident or are gravely ill. They go to the best doctors and nurses they can find for their specific malady. Yes, I shop around for $$$$ deals on cars, clothes, food, etc., but not when it comes to health and lives...... Access to all for basic essential healthcare is one of the hallmarks of a truly civilized, humane and compassionate society, where everyone pitches in, in their own way, to help all in need when they need it. Sometimes this is done by individual action, or small groups, sometime by government action with the ideal being that the govt. works on behalf of all of us. Maybe a person may not be in that sort of need right now, but it's nice to know that it's there just in case.

    I know that for a lot of people the corporate for-profit model is the end-all be-all example that should be followed in every life situation ("Greed is good": Michael Douglas, as Gordon Gekko - from the movie "Wall Street"). Hey, maybe we should start charging our kids $$$ when we have to clean up their messes etc. when their allowances are figured I'm kidding (only partly) about that one, but you get my drift. The for-profit model works fine for stores and shops, but my own personal belief is that it really isn't the best economic model for healthcare and hospitals......
  8. by   Kosmonavt
    Quote from traumaRUs
    In the one payor systems though, there is no incentive to pay more since everyone works essentially for the same employer. You will see wages decrease.
    If that's the case, how come nurses in Manitoba make more than nurses in North Dakota?
  9. by   karenchad
    the Canadian dollar is different then the American dollar. $47..00/hour Canadian dollars is not $47.00/hour American dollars. they are 2 different currencies. The Canadian dollar used to be worth less than the American dollar - ie: a pair of jeans in Canadia costing $42.00 may only be $24.00 in the U.S. ( key word: used to be- I don't know what the exact current rate of exchange is)
  10. by   forever nursing 35
    Depending on where you live there maybe a nursing shortage and there may not be. People are living longer because we teach them how to live healthy. I think that these nurse's that can not find jobs maybe need to think about relocating. Where I work we are so short staff it is unreal sometimes. There is a demand for nurse's and just not enough of us.
  11. by   forever nursing 35
    I keep reading all these hospitals closing I can understand that with all the new "health technology" and the rising cost to pay for all this advance treatment who can afford it to go to the hospital the bill can easily become outrageous just for 1 visit.
  12. by   Ginger's Mom
    Two points, could nurses post where nursing opportunities are available ? This would be very helpful.

    The federal government has a two prong approach. If you have objections contact your representatives.

    H.R. 2536, The Emergency Nursing Supply Relief Act which is to immediately allow internationally trained nurses come to relieve the nursing shortage.

    S. 497, The Nurse Education, Expansion, and Development Act of 2009 which will increase nursing school capacity for more nursing students.
  13. by   hope3456
    Quote from Alexk49
    Two points, could nurses post where nursing opportunities are available ? This would be very helpful.

    The federal government has a two prong approach. If you have objections contact your representatives.

    H.R. 2536, The Emergency Nursing Supply Relief Act which is to immediately allow internationally trained nurses come to relieve the nursing shortage.

    S. 497, The Nurse Education, Expansion, and Development Act of 2009 which will increase nursing school capacity for more nursing students.
    [[/I]

    I did contact my elected officials about these bills. I informed them new graduate rn's are having trouble finding employment right now......what is the point of expanding nsg programs if the hospitals don' t want to hire the students? And if new grad AMERICAN students can't find jobs......we certaintly don't need foreign nurses.

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