Recession eases nurse shortage in Florida

  1. JACKSONVILLE-Alison Carpenter is fresh from graduation at the University of North Florida with ink barely dried on her nursing degree, and she's realizing the grim reality of entering the work force.

    She knows that even as a newly graduated nurse, she might not be working as one any time soon.
    Health care officials say the nursing shortage that has plagued hospitals for years has, at least temporarily, been alleviated.

    The recession has prompted many nurses to re-enter the work force while others have delayed retirement. Those employment trends, coupled with staff reductions at many hospitals, have made for few job opportunities for nursing students exiting colleges across the country.
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    About Brian, ADN

    Joined: Mar '98; Posts: 15,418; Likes: 16,382
    allnurses.com founder; from US
    Specialty: CCU, Geriatrics, Critical Care, Tele

    48 Comments

  3. by   UM Review RN
    The nursing shortage has been resolved so quickly, it kinda makes you wonder if there ever was one, doesn't it.

    Edited to add *sarcasm.*
    Last edit by UM Review RN on May 1, '09
  4. by   JaxNewGrad
    I'm in Jacksonville, BSN from Jacksonville University, and I've been looking for 8 months. Or, I should say, I gave up looking for work as a nurse and I'm working a full-time job and a part-time job, neither of them in healthcare.

    So much for my recession-proof degree...
  5. by   TopCat1234
    don't tell me this...as i plan to start nursing school in july....
  6. by   lindarn
    Quote from JaxNewGrad
    I'm in Jacksonville, BSN from Jacksonville University, and I've been looking for 8 months. Or, I should say, I gave up looking for work as a nurse and I'm working a full-time job and a part-time job, neither of them in healthcare.

    So much for my recession-proof degree...
    Since you have you BSN, have you though of joining the military? If you have been able to get part time jobs, you could join the reserves, and be elegible for Tricare Select, military insurance for reservists and guardsman. There is also Tricare dental insurance for reservists, which I have had for a long time. You can insure dependants, spouse, children, and is very affordable.

    Tricare Select insurance for only the reservist, is only $47.50 a month, and the dental is about $25 a month. Again, you can insure dependants on the Tricare dental insurance as well.

    Hope that helps. There are jobs in Washington State for new grads, and I have posted the information of previous threads. I don't know if you would be willing to move to Washington State. We have no state income tax here, low crime, good schools and colleges, lots of military bases, and it is a dry climate, with little humidity. I am originally from NY, and could never go back to the east coast because of the humidity.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington
  7. by   nicurn001
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    The nursing shortage has been resolved so quickly, it kinda makes you wonder if there ever was one, doesn't it.
    I do not think there has ever been a real shortage of nurses , rather there is a nursing treadmill upon whiich we all ride . bedside nurses control the flow on this treadmill , if working conditions are good or if the economy outside healthcare is poor , they enjoy a long ride on the treadmill , at these times there is no shortage of nurse.When bedside nurses can no longer tolerate their situation they jump off the treadmill and so positions become available .

    Employers do what they can to perpetuate this treadmill ,as it allows the impression that nurses are a dime a dozen , so if you don't like it here , they can tell you to get lost because somebody else will take your position .
  8. by   Gr8Dane
    The bigger problem is nursing schools pushing out so many grads. LPN's I forsee being eliminated from the acute care setting with the new influx of RN Grads. (Beyond the fact there are so many LPN's being flooded onto the market the license is becoming quite worthless to have).
  9. by   nicurn001
    Quote from Gr8Dane
    The bigger problem is nursing schools pushing out so many grads. LPN's I forsee being eliminated from the acute care setting with the new influx of RN Grads. (Beyond the fact there are so many LPN's being flooded onto the market the license is becoming quite worthless to have).
    Agreed , but who is pushing / funding the schools to produce more and more graduates ?
  10. by   jjjoy
    The problem isn't the number of new grads, I think. It's that nursing grads aren't prepared to fill a full-time nursing role upon graduation. Having earned a nursing license doesn't mean that one is qualified for any nursing job. No one expects a new grad to be on their own in ICU in just a few weeks, and we accept that. The thing is that many new grads also aren't ready to be on their own in just about any clinical setting, including med-surg units. Unlike an experienced new hire, a new grad may need several months of preceptoring (increased staffing costs) and evern after that will be *highly* dependent upon their colleagues for up to a year or more - which means more work for the experienced nurses on shift with them and less flexibility in staffing patterns.

    Why should the hospital have to absorb the high cost of transitioning new grads across the wide gap between nursing school clinical experience (very limited!) and real-world nursing responsibilities? That's why I think the idea of residencies for nurses makes some sense. During the residency period, the new grad works for a much reduced wage in order to get the needed experience. The hospital gets an extra set of nursing hands for a low price. And after 6-9 months, having completed the residency, the new grad is now prepared to step into a full-fledged nursing role for regular, competitive wages. The trick to that, though, is trying to set it up so that nurse residents wouldn't be exploited.
  11. by   libnat
    Much reduced wage, isn't $19 an hour reduced enough when you have to support yourself and pay back those loans.
  12. by   ImMrBill3, RN
    Quote from jjjoy
    The problem isn't the number of new grads, I think. It's that nursing grads aren't prepared to fill a full-time nursing role upon graduation. Having earned a nursing license doesn't mean that one is qualified for any nursing job. No one expects a new grad to be on their own in ICU in just a few weeks, and we accept that. The thing is that many new grads also aren't ready to be on their own in just about any clinical setting, including med-surg units. Unlike an experienced new hire, a new grad may need several months of preceptoring (increased staffing costs) and evern after that will be *highly* dependent upon their colleagues for up to a year or more - which means more work for the experienced nurses on shift with them and less flexibility in staffing patterns.

    Why should the hospital have to absorb the high cost of transitioning new grads across the wide gap between nursing school clinical experience (very limited!) and real-world nursing responsibilities? That's why I think the idea of residencies for nurses makes some sense. During the residency period, the new grad works for a much reduced wage in order to get the needed experience. The hospital gets an extra set of nursing hands for a low price. And after 6-9 months, having completed the residency, the new grad is now prepared to step into a full-fledged nursing role for regular, competitive wages. The trick to that, though, is trying to set it up so that nurse residents wouldn't be exploited.
    Or the requirement for clinical experience in nursing school could be raised. My school requires twice what many other BSN programs do in total clinical hours, as a result we are fairly readily hired.
    Hospitals should bear the burden of transitioning new employees just as all employers do. That is normal and to be expected and a part of the reason why nurses with experience receive more pay. I have to agree with libnat that the pay scale is already low enough at the bottom considering the investment of time and money one has made by the time one graduates. What about the idea of raising it at the other end. Highly experienced and competent nurses save hospitals millions in costs and liability it is just because the billing aspect of health care doesn't take that into consideration so the pay does not increase. Also hospitals prefer to maintain the power of if you don't like it here we can replace you at the same cost. Just my 40% of a nickel.
  13. by   jjjoy
    Some people say one's first year working as a nurse is really the final year of one's training. If everyone expected that new grads wouldn't be qualified for a full-fledged nursing job until after completing a residency, then students could factor that in when considering how to afford becoming a nurse and programs could factor that in when designing and advertising their programs so you know what to expect.

    I know most of us like the idea of career that with just two years of school we could easily land a job making good money. Which is how nursing has been for a long time. But between the increased competitiveness to get into school (making it 3-4 years to get that "2-year degree"), the expansion of nursing knowledge and roles (meaning there's more to cover in that 2 year program) and hospitals' reluctance to hire new grads (leaving new grads unemployed while nursing positions go unfilled), it seems the entry to nursing is already changing, whether we like it or not.
  14. by   jjjoy
    Quote from ImMrBill3
    Or the requirement for clinical experience in nursing school could be raised.
    I could definitely support that!

    It often comes back to money. More clinical experience means more clinical instructors and more time on hospital units. Who will pay for the increased clinical education? Students in the form of increase tuition fees? Taxpayers in the form of subsidies to schools?

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