Recession eases nurse shortage in Florida - page 4

JACKSONVILLE-Alison Carpenter is fresh from graduation at the University of North Florida with ink barely dried on her nursing degree, and she's realizing the grim reality of entering the work force.... Read More

  1. by   misswoosie
    Well,I think there is a nursing shortage in some states and in some specilaities.
    Coming from the UK where nurse training is standardised nationally,I wonder about the differences in number of clinical hours students are getting in various programmes. I was shocked to read that someone doing a 4 year BSN would only have 1000 clinical hours. No way does this prepare you to be a fully fledged RN.Then I wondered what clinical hours those doing ADN had and how much it varied across programmes.
    Maybe this is the reason why some new grads can't get jobs-they have so few clinical hours in their training that it coats the hospitals too much to "train" those nurses.Seems like the nurse training programmes might be the ones letting people down and being "cheap". Is there a difference in tuition fees across different programmes,ie is a BSN course that has fewer clinical hours cheaper than one with more?
    They are pushing for more training courses for nurses to try and meet the nursing shortage of the future (or here and now),but they must produce nurses with the skills to function as RNs otherwise it is a waste of everyones time and money.
  2. by   PrettyPrisonNurse31
    Quote from Gr8Dane
    The bigger problem is nursing schools pushing out so many grads. LPN's I forsee being eliminated from the acute care setting with the new influx of RN Grads. (Beyond the fact there are so many LPN's being flooded onto the market the license is becoming quite worthless to have).
    Not sure if I should take offense to this or not.

    PrettyPrisonNurse
  3. by   AtomicWoman
    Quote from paulie23
    Before I got my RN I received a BA in the Classics. Now there's a degree w/o a shortage; just before I graduated my advisor told me this joke: "How do you get the classicist off your porch? Pay him for the pizza."
    Thanks for the laugh!
  4. by   yfloridanurse
    A residency program is nice, but why reduce wage. We all being through being the new grd, and were treated fairly, why ask others to be treated less. THE BIG problem with nurses and hospitals is not that they are trying to get the experience nurses only, but also that they are trying to work with what they have even is it means more patients for nurses and sometimes nurses are only doing medications. The hospital I work at is a very good example of pushing, we have one transporter for the entire hospital during the night, one or two housekeeping for the entire hospital at night, and if we to nursing they came about a grid they consider is fair, according to the census they have at midnight, that most of the time in the morning it will not make any sense, and the grid changes at night and again in weekends, and sometimes they only schedule 3 nurse with a charge nurse because of the grid and guess what the nurses including the charge nurse has to take 7 patients a piece in a general surgical area. If they call that nursing shortage decreased we are in big trouble. In my area there has been a shift because Home Health bottom down somewhat what made many home health nurses to go back to hospital, but just wait until the economy turns around and everybody decide to go back to their place. Let's see where the hospital will get their nurses from. Its a very bad circle. :angryfire
  5. by   americanurse
    if hospitals are losing money due to increased staff on preceptoring then they should develop a plan for the new grads such as less pay while on training and have them sign an agreement to stay for 2 years including the training. I believe 2months of training for new grad RN is enough! im a new grad RN and i would be willing to do this because until now i haven't got a job and been looking for more than a month now. Mentoring of new RNs especially US citizens/residents should be mandated by the state or the dept of labor/health to the hospitals. how could we compete against experienced and super skilled foreign nurses if no one would do this? I advice to all to new RNs to write your congress and dept of labor/health about this rather than resorting to shortcuts while thousands of US citizens/residents lose jobs. no offense to foreign nurses.
  6. by   NabiRN
    I may be off the topic here. I notice that my facility recently hired a few part-time nurses who already have jobs at other hospitals. For example, they work 3 days 12 hrs at one place and then come here for another 3 days 12 hrs or 2-12's. They are usually tired from working so many hours and not good team players. Yes, they have experience but they are lazy and they don't care if they lose this job because they have another job somewhere else. Why not fill these open slots with trainees who are willing and able to learn and give it all they got? Perhaps some of you who are managers can answer this one.
  7. by   AtomicWoman
    Quote from NabiRN
    I may be off the topic here. I notice that my facility recently hired a few part-time nurses who already have jobs at other hospitals. For example, they work 3 days 12 hrs at one place and then come here for another 3 days 12 hrs or 2-12's. They are usually tired from working so many hours and not good team players. Yes, they have experience but they are lazy and they don't care if they lose this job because they have another job somewhere else. Why not fill these open slots with trainees who are willing and able to learn and give it all they got? Perhaps some of you who are managers can answer this one.
    I wonder if they look attractive as job candidates, because they don't require the benefits of a full-time nurse who does not have another job? Just wondering out loud.
  8. by   jjjoy
    Quote from AtomicWoman
    I wonder if they look attractive as job candidates, because they don't require the benefits of a full-time nurse who does not have another job? Just wondering out loud.
    Not having to pay full-time benefits would certainly make a budget conscious hiring manager happy.

    I've worked at a place that turned a blind eye to several regular nurses who always arrived late or left early because they had back-to-back shifts scheduled with different employers. They probably had to do the same thing at the other job (arrive late, leave early) for enough time to travel from one place to the other.

    In some cases, it seems that there's an unspoken deal that the nurses won't make any waves about problems such as short staffing and the managers won't make any waves about lack of teamwork or late arrivals or such. There are reasons in addition to costs that some places might be reluctant to hire an eager, gung-ho new nurse who plans to really invest themselves in a job and will be asking lots of questions about how and why things are done the way they are.

    Some people working two jobs might not care much about keeping the second job but I imagine for many it is pressing financial obligations that drive them to work so many hourse. Thus, I'd think they'd be *less* likely to quit (or speak up about poor working conditions or point out flaws in the system). They've worked out a system and schedule that they can handle and that meets their needs; who knows how long it might take to find such a combination elsewhere.

    Some can handle working so many hours and still provide an even quality care. Others may cut as many corners as is possible without getting reprimanded in order to save their energy. Some may be lazy and rude if only working 30 hours a week, but it's hard to imagine many people working 60 hours a week on their feet in nursing and still being energetic and a helpful team player.
  9. by   sportyN
    "the requirement for clinical experience in nursing school could be raised. My school requires twice what many other BSN programs do in total clinical hours, as a result we are fairly readily hired".

    Would you mind to say what school you are attending?

    Thank you
  10. by   KT2010
    Just wondering here in Jacksonville, Fl

    Does anyone know the starting pay for new grads (RNs) at the local hospitals?

    Shands, St.Vincents, Memorial, Baptist, Orange Park Medical????????

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