Public schools to send home weight reports - page 8

What do you all think of this? I think it's a step in the right direction to address the public health crisis of overweight kids.... Read More

  1. by   FireStarterRN
    The government in Japan is charging people a fine or tax if they get overweight. It's probably not much different, conceptually, than 'sin taxes' that we have in the U.S. on cigarettes or booze. They are meant to discourage over consumption and raise money. When you have state funded health care, it's in the state's interest for people to avoid things that deteriorate their health.

    Maybe have a tax on junk food instead?
  2. by   MAISY, RN-ER
    My point is that it shouldn't be about the weight, but the health of a child. Skinny does not necessarily equal good.

    I have seen small children obsessing about weight and I think it's ridiculous! The focus should be on good nutrition and exercise options. My point is saying controlled environment-keep school a full (till 4PM) day, with meals and a snack. Full exercise periods along with fun sports/games and I guarentee you will have healthier kids.
    However it will never happen due to the already high price of school. Every other country(that is like us) in the world's children enjoy the highest rates of everything(education), including a healthier weight and lifestyle than we do.

    The heaviest kids I have seen have no mom or dad at home in the afternoon and are left to their own devices regarding food choices, and may not be able to go outside to play due to safety or lack of play area. We also drive our kids everywhere, including playdates.

    As a child, I lived on a 10 speed and rode miles to do things.

    I guess I have to go back to how I felt with the pediatrician, I knew my kids were bigger in height and frame than others their age(couldn't change that), I knew they weighed substantially more than others their age(knew when I lugged them around), but they didn't appear fat, and were definitely given nutritious meals and were very active and I DIDN'T CARE WHAT SHE SAID! My two son 6'4" ish and daughter 5'10" are model beautiful, and athletic healthy. They aren't skinny, but they are normal and accept their weights as normal for them.

    People who value or don't recognize fat in their children will be telling you all the same thing-to mind your own business! They already know their child is bigger and will do everything they can to protect them-IN THIS CASE YOU WILL BE THE BAD GUY!

    I say require all parents to come to school at the beginning of the year. Do a nutrition seminar with real food representations and snacks placed on plates(for portion control reference), allow them to ask questions, encourage them to turn off the tv, allow outdoors play, walk or bike with their kids, walk in the mall if inclement, drink water before eating(thirst instead of hunger)-these would help. Numbers assign blame and we all don't fit statistical weight charts. How nice for the insurance companies.

    M
  3. by   MAISY, RN-ER
    Quote from FireStarterRN
    The government in Japan is charging people a fine or tax if they get overweight. It's probably not much different, conceptually, than 'sin taxes' that we have in the U.S. on cigarettes or booze. They are meant to discourage over consumption and raise money. When you have state funded health care, it's in the state's interest for people to avoid things that deteriorate their health.

    Maybe have a tax on junk food instead?

    The tax on junk food is probably the best idea, also government subsidy of fruits and vegetables to bring down prices. Someone else wrote about high fructose corn syrup-it's unnatural, and is created. Very high sweetness factor, and I stopped buying anything with it years ago!

    As for corn, I love it! BUT, think about it....used to fatten animals....hmmmm.

    Instead of corn subsidy, subsidize good veggies....fruits....healthy snacks.....whole grains.
  4. by   FireStarterRN
    Maisy, I would very much resent the schools 'requiring' me to attend a nutrition seminar. For one thing, I think my holistic approach to health and eating is far superior to what a standard nutritionist can tell me.

    I agree with the idea of eliminating the blatantly crappy food offered in schools. Also, pop machines and snack machines should be banned. P.E. should have varied offerings, with 'fit for life' offerings included. 'Fit for Life', for those who don't know, are sports and exercise programs that can be easily carried on into adulthood, such as biking, walking, x-country skiing.
  5. by   MAISY, RN-ER
    [quote=FireStarterRN;3580173]Maisy, I would very much resent the schools 'requiring' me to attend a nutrition seminar. For one thing, I think my holistic approach to health and eating is far superior to what a standard nutritionist can tell me.

    I agree with the idea of eliminating the blatantly crappy food offered in schools. Also, pop machines and snack machines should be banned. P.E. should have varied offerings, with 'fit for life' offerings included. 'Fit for Life', for those who don't know, are sports and exercise programs that can be easily carried on into adulthood, such as biking, walking, x-country skiing.[/quote

    I'd hate to think you were in the minority, but my kids are recently grown and to college. Having seen what their friends ate during their youth amazes me. The amounts and types of food were way out of proportion to what was healthy. I did not withhold vegetables, we had a garden and they ate everything. I have met adults in my age group who still say "eww" to veggies!

    While you may ultimately be a good parent and understand nutrition, most do not. The whole idea of clearing your plate or portion control is something that is familial and can only be recognized if presented to parents. Seeing is sometimes believing. That's why I believe a health fair showcasing food, food products, healthy lunches, healthy snacks, and healthy alternatives would be a good choice. And while you say you'd find it insulting, I believe you would be the best type of parent to have at one of these presentations. One who lives the rhetoric.

    Health is everyone's responsibility. If it were seen in positive light that included "fun" exercise it would be a positive that would infect our American culture. Perhaps making it affordable for all to engage in sports and healthy activities.

    M
  6. by   Aneroo
    I haven't read all 10 pages of this topic.
    We do this in our schools. The schools nurses do the screening, enter data onto the CDC website and find out their BMI percentage. A letter is then sent home with a referral if they are underweight, overweight, or at risk. I remind students this just looks at numbers and not the actual person, which is why we refer them to their PMD. I bring the fat/muscle models (they're 5lbs each) to show what density means.
    The problem? I can send letters home all day long, but until the family cares, or until we get a program at school to help that everyone can afford and is effective, it's almost useless. One nurse is using her data to try and get her school snack and soda machine free.
  7. by   Aneroo
    Wanted to add: We had a hard time getting some instructors to allow us to send home the BMI letters (they went to every student so no one feels singled out). At the middle school, a girl become anorexic. Parents blamed ONE LETTER sent home saying she was at risk for becoming overweight. One letter sent home did not make this child anorexic. Help her obsess over her weight more? Probably. I believe the parents needed someone to blame and we were it, not that there could actually be something mentally and medically wrong with their child. We have it worded carefully now. Generic letter, low reading level.

    I also try and do BMI teaching with the health classes when we do this. Like I said before, I bring in the fat/muscle models so they see the difference and how BMI doesn't care WHO you are but just the numbers. We have a picture of two guys who weight 200 pounds and are the same height/BMI. One is a football player, the other is a couch potato.
    I bring in the portion sizes. I ask them to think about how many slices of pizza they eat when they get a pizza- and then show them the real portion size. I ask how many get super duper sized soda at McDonalds and get two refills- then show them the 12 oz portion size and explain how many calories are in that. They need the visual- most of these kids don't learn from reading or even listening. They need to see it.
  8. by   Jolie
    Quote from FireStarterRN
    P.E. should have varied offerings, with 'fit for life' offerings included. 'Fit for Life', for those who don't know, are sports and exercise programs that can be easily carried on into adulthood, such as biking, walking, x-country skiing.
    I had to chuckle at this. My daughter's middle school added a class called "Fit for Life" this year. It is a rotation class, like art, home-ec, shop, etc. I was pleased at the concept and eager to learn what the curriculum would be. Well, no nutrition, no practical skills like food preparation or shopping, no sun safety, no injury prevention, not even an introduction to life-long sports or athletic activities. They run. A mile a day. Regardless of the weather. Regardless of the fact that the kids have already run in PE that day. And the overweight instructor does not run with them. She just stands there and blows her whistle. All this class has accomplished is to convince my daughter how much she hates to run.

    Education truly begins and ends at home. Anyone relying on the public school system to teach their children anything meaningful is going to be sorely disappointed.
  9. by   MAISY, RN-ER
    Quote from Jolie
    I had to chuckle at this. My daughter's middle school added a class called "Fit for Life" this year. It is a rotation class, like art, home-ec, shop, etc. I was pleased at the concept and eager to learn what the curriculum would be. Well, no nutrition, no practical skills like food preparation or shopping, no sun safety, no injury prevention, not even an introduction to life-long sports or athletic activities. They run. A mile a day. Regardless of the weather. Regardless of the fact that the kids have already run in PE that day. And the overweight instructor does not run with them. She just stands there and blows her whistle. All this class has accomplished is to convince my daughter how much she hates to run.

    Education truly begins and ends at home. Anyone relying on the public school system to teach their children anything meaningful is going to be sorely disappointed.
    See what a wasted opportunity to teach....sigh....running is not for everyone, and makes the kids who are out of shape stand out like a sore thumb. School administrators must take the same classes as hospital administrators...quick fixes with no substance. It's the proverbial finger in the dike. How sad...you should mail your post to them.

    M

close