Public schools to send home weight reports - page 5

What do you all think of this? I think it's a step in the right direction to address the public health crisis of overweight kids.... Read More

  1. by   HonestRN
    Further food for thought on the subject:

    Eating junk food during pregnancy and breastfeeding gives offspring taste for junk food

    "Our study has shown that eating large quantities of junk food when pregnant and breastfeeding could impair the normal control of appetite and promote an exacerbated taste for junk food in offspring," says lead author Dr St'phanie Bayol. "This could send offspring on the road to obesity and make the task of teaching healthy eating habits in children even more challenging."

    http://www.news-medical.net/?id=28810

    Even more reason to educate about good eating and obesity
  2. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from HonestRN

    Eating junk food during pregnancy and breastfeeding gives offspring taste for junk food

    "Our study has shown that eating large quantities of junk food when pregnant and breastfeeding could impair the normal control of appetite and promote an exacerbated taste for junk food in offspring,"
    now only if pregnant women could have healthy cravings...

    leslie
  3. by   ®Nurse
    Quote from bradleyrn
    did it ever occur to the public school system that by removing physical education from their curriculum to save money, that they have in fact perpetuated and magnified the problem of childhood obesity? i saw on the news the other day a public school instituting a "pilot program" where kids get an hour a day of physical fitness. it turns out their scores in other classes went up. i was astonished to hear them use the term "pilot program", because throughout my school life, we had pe every year through to the 10th grade.
    send the weight reports, but also start up this brand new idea of having physical education as well. :spin:
    i think this is an absolutely genius idea! stop the blame train right now, and get pe back in the schools.
  4. by   luvschoolnursing
    Our schools have sent home the BMI's for a few years now. We send them home on all the kids, not just the over weight or underweight. The first year we sent them home there were many complaints that it was none of the school's business, etc.

    Now we only get a handful of complaints each year. I do believe most parents don't even bother to read the letter or the accompanying healthy eating info we send. Most parents I have asked do not recall getting this info last year.

    It is very time consuming doing the ht/wt/bmi, entering all the data into the computer, generating the letters, folding and stuffing envelopes and running them all through the postage machine. (I have 1,000 students) Just getting the kids to the health office to do the screenings is quite the chore.

    If I thought doing this made any difference whatsoever, I would think it was time very well spent, but as it is, I'm not so sure.

    Other screenings we do such as vision, hearing, scoliosis seem to be much better received by the families.
  5. by   StNeotser
    Can the FDA or the government not help itself by stopping bowing to corporations and the corn lobby. Why must high fructose corn syrup be in everything? My daughters school district stopped having soda machines in schools a couple of years ago and I do not buy soda at all. I made her walk the 15 minute walk to school the other day even though I was doing nothing and could have given her a ride if I'd wanted. If she wants to spend half an hour in the bathroom with her hair straightener that's fine but she'll have to wake up earlier. No rides to school unless it's snowing here.

    I don't want to sound like an annoying foreigner but when I first came to America I was amazed at how much was piled on peoples plates. It's like everyone is still eating like they're working a 14 hour day on the farm but without the farm work.

    And I agree with Equinox, you can buy whole wheat pasta/bread and brown rice and all kinds of healthy alternatives even at Walmart. Once we all start demanding it, the prices will come down even further.
  6. by   MichelleB34
    I have two boys that are almost 4 and 6 years old. They have had the same pediatrician since they were born. They go to that pediatrician for a physical every year and they are weighed. I expect the pediatrician to give me advice on their healthcare needs. In our school district physicals are required for students in certain grades. You have to bring a signed health form from your child's pediatrician. I'm pretty sure that if you don't the school has a designated day that physicals are done. If your child has their own pediatrician I don't think the school has any business telling you about your child's weight. Someone else mentioned that the schools screen for other things so what is the difference. About 20 years ago when I was in junior high I had to be screened for scoliosis. It was embarassing to have this done at school. They thought I might have scoliosis so I had to go to the pediatrician and be screened again. Thankfully I did not. I think the school needs to stick to education. From time to time you hear in the news how our schools are behind in certain subjects. Our schools need to further our children's education. Not to mention the school nurse has many responsibilities as it is. I work in a hospital but I have substituted as a school nurse a few times. Not only do they have to take care of the children who get sick or injured but they also hand out medications and often may have special needs children that need medical procedures done during the school day. If the government wants schools to have a role in our children's weight management I think it should only be to educate children on what a healthy diet is. The rest is up the parents and the medical professionals.
  7. by   LaneyB
    I'm constantly frustrated by the junk food my children encounter in every activity they engage in outside of the home.

    Not only that, I am amazed at how often they are fed at events now. My kids were both in soccer, and they had a snack at half time, and another snack after the game. Do they really need 2 snacks? And when my daughter was a cheerleader the girls all had snacks at halftime after they did their halftime cheer. I just don't remember snacking so much during sporting events.

    As far as schools sending home the information, I have mixed feelings. My kids were invited to a health day, where they were weighed and measured, and they were also given some fitness challenges and had their cholesterol checked. It was optional and it was done away from the school as a field trip. The information turned out to be useful because although my kids have a perfect BMI I found out they both have high cholesterol. Unfortunately it appears to be familial and does not respond much to diet changes (although every little bit helps). My 13 year old daughter would be horrified to be weighed at school.
  8. by   pink85
    I am a school nurse and I want to put in my opinion. First of all unless you are going to send home a bmi calculation on each child and not just on the overweight children I would not want to do it. This is so touchy. Parents get SO offended. I have been chewed out by parents for sending home a dental referral on kids who had teeth with large holes! Secondly, what do you think the parent is going to do when they get the info that their child is overweight? The same thing that happens when we send home referrals for Acanthosis Nigricans (dark thickening of the skin on the back of the neck, a precurser sign to diabetes type II, usually in overweight children). Nothing. They know their child is overweight. The ones that do take their children to their doctor (some doctors are not even familiar with AN and tell the family it is just hyperpigmentation of the skin) recommend diet and exercise. Duh! And that is it. No more. The end. Like someone else had said, the parents are usually overweight and it is true. It is also expensive to eat healthy. I work at a low income school so I am sure my kids eat more cheap mac and cheese and Little Debbies as opposed to fresh fruit and veggies. The obersity problem starts and ends at home not school. All we can do is tell you that your child is overweight and offer help, we can.t fix the problem for you. That is up to the parents. They just keep putting more nad more on the schools, it's crazy!
  9. by   MichelleB34
    You are so right about the snacks. My son started kindergarten this year and I was surprised that I have to send snacks to school with him. He starts school at 9:10 and eats lunch at 11:30. Our school district also has a breakfast program.
  10. by   candiam
    I think in theory this is a great idea. Yes, SOME people have there own pediatricians but a lot of americans only take their children to the doctor if there is a problem, not for regular health screenings. I also believe some parents are in denial about their childs health problems/weight. Also, most parents do not have a college (or even high school) education so they really could not know about the potential health problems their child is at risk for. This is a great oppurtunity to teach the community about healthier life styles! In Austin we have a program that meets with students with high BMI's and their parents about lifestyle changes for the ENTIRE family! This screening could be the beginning of some great programs for families that need help! Oh and I truly hope that PE is put back into schools!!!! That is a must!!
    Last edit by candiam on Apr 16, '09 : Reason: addition
  11. by   morte
    sigh.....if i had children in public school, i would be sending notice to principal and nurse, that they would NOT be doing ANY screening on my child, and would risk assault charges if they did.
  12. by   luvschoolnursing
    Quote from morte
    sigh.....if i had children in public school, i would be sending notice to principal and nurse, that they would NOT be doing ANY screening on my child, and would risk assault charges if they did.

    Wow...I don't know what to say. I think we do a lot of good in a community health capacity. Most parents are very grateful to have us here.
  13. by   vashtee
    Quote from morte
    sigh.....if i had children in public school, i would be sending notice to principal and nurse, that they would NOT be doing ANY screening on my child, and would risk assault charges if they did.
    I wasn't interested in forcing my unwilling daughter to comply with the weight screening. She didn't need someone unfamiliar with her medical history and medication side effects trying to tell her whether or not she has a weight issue.

    Teenage girls have so many body issues as it is - I wonder if the school districts would be prepared to deal with a sudden rise in anorexia and bulemia?

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