Prospects for nurses expected to brighten.

  1. Time is on your side.

    Registered nurses can take those words to the bank, say regional health care employers. Although jobs are fewer this year and some registered nurses in Spokane are being laid off as part of broad hospital reorganizations, the stubborn recession won’t be able to slow health care spending much longer.

    Job-seeking nurses face far fewer openings this year in the region than they did last year. But this year may be a blip.
    Full Story:
    http://www.spokesman.com/stories/200...ht-for-nurses/
    Last edit by brian on Jun 1, '09
  2. Visit oramar profile page

    About oramar

    Joined: Nov '98; Posts: 7,097; Likes: 5,234
    returned nurse

    33 Comments

  3. by   hiddencatRN
    Ohhhh I hope so. I'm possibly shelling out $$$ for an accelerated BSN program, so a job when I graduate would be, you know, nice and all.
  4. by   pennyaline
    Yes, EVERYONE is saying this. Current conditions, however, say something else.
  5. by   OC_An Khe
    The demographics of the baby boom generation can not be denied, there will be an increase in demand for our services over the next 20 yearsor so. How much society is willing to pay for those services is another question. typically when demand out strips supply the price rises. However capital must still be available to pay for that supply(hence todays lay offs and sparse job openings). So to a large degree our compensation and availability of employment will be determined by the resolution of health care financing: whether it be by a one payer system, universal coverage mandated by government action, of pure market forces, or the present mish mash of systems.
  6. by   pennyaline
    Quote from ocankhe
    The demographics of the baby boom generation can not be denied, there will be an increase in demand for our services over the next 20 yearsor so...
    Which doesn't bode well for many of "us." Within that timeframe, most of "us" will be the ones demanding services. Woe is me, indeed!

    (please, please, please... wave the magic wand and create a means of training loads of good, conscientious nurses by that time, please!)
  7. by   oramar
    The other day I heard a economist say that for every person who breaks their hip in 2010 there will be six that break their hip in 2030. Times that by all the admissions for knee replacements, heart failure, copd and you get some idea of the problem. It gives you some idea of the scope of the looming baby boom geriatric crisis. That was the first time that someone every gave me the numbers in a way that I could get my head around the situation. In 2030 I will be 82, that means I will be one of them. I have been saying that rationing of health care is a very real possibility for my generation and I have been critisized for it.
  8. by   Multicollinearity
    This situation will brighten, but the question is when? How long will it take? What will happen with the new grads whose degrees are becoming "stale" and cannot land a new grad job?

    http://www.spokesman.com/stories/200...ht-for-nurses/
    “We see a bright future for future nurses,” said Patricia Butterfield, dean of the Washington State University College of Nursing.
    Students may have to adjust their expectations and realize that the nation is in an economic downturn, Butterfield said. “We tell them to be patient.”
    Patience will not buy my groceries and pay my bills. Lucky for me, I can move just about anywhere in the US to land a new grad job if needed. Everyone is not so fortunate. Many are less mobile due to mortgages, children, and spouses with jobs in their communities.

    I know good things are on the horizon, but these sure are trying times.
  9. by   oramar
    Quote from multicollinearity
    This situation will brighten, but the question is when? How long will it take? What will happen with the new grads whose degrees are becoming "stale" and cannot land a new grad job?

    Patience will not buy my groceries and pay my bills. Lucky for me, I can move just about anywhere in the US to land a new grad job if needed. Everyone is not so fortunate. Many are less mobile due to mortgages, children, and spouses with jobs in their communities.

    I know good things are on the horizon, but these sure are trying times.
    Well spoken. Easy to say things will get better but if you just got a foreclosure notice on your house it is cold comfort.
  10. by   Domina
    Well, I laughed out loud the other day when I saw on the news how the nursing shortage has tapered off in Florida. I started my pre and co reqs for nursing school in 1991. I was admitted to the program then but "life" happened. I got married had a child. BLAH BLAH BLAH.I have waited this long to go back and look at the market for nusring now. I just applied for an Aug 09 start at Daytona State College.

    My mom is a retired nurse. Both of my sisters are nurses and one of my brother-in-laws. They all had jobs lined up for them when they graduated through the various years.

    I'm trying to keep my sense of humor about this because reading all of these posts about the economy and new grads not finding jobs is very disheartening.I haven't even got in and I just hope in the next couple of years this downturn passes.


    :smackingfThe road to success is always under construction.......Have a good day to all.
  11. by   Ketisha79
    Nursing is recession proof>>>We will always have a job...
  12. by   sassiebaz
    Quote from Ketisha79
    Nursing is recession proof>>>We will always have a job...

    Not so true....many have been laid off......many can't find work. Yes, there will always be jobs, but getting them may not be so easy. Some have re-entered the workforce, some hospitals have indeed endured cutbacks. So, recession proof....no! Less chance of lay-offs than other fields...yes!
  13. by   angel337
    i agree with this. no matter how bad the economy gets, healthare will always be in demand. its only so long they can put off hiring nurses.
  14. by   jenn_nurse
    Quote from Ketisha79
    Nursing is recession proof>>>We will always have a job...

    You might, but in the Philadelphia area, finding a job without 1-2 years med/surg experience is proving difficult.

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