Prospects for nurses expected to brighten. - page 3

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  1. by   Valerie Salva
    Quote from alfa-sierra
    Mrs. Butterfield's words of sage advice ("I tell them to be patient") exemplifies the comatose state of Nursing Leadership in the US. She should instead have said: "Here is your refund. Now if you still have an inclination to work in Health Care go get your credentials in a real profession such as Physical or Occupational Therapy or Pharmacy". Nursing can't call itself a profession for as long as, among other factors, ANA's lobbying arm can't control the supply side of the equation in favor of nurses, can't control the erosion of earning power, and can't once and for all eliminate sub-professional entry levels of preparation. The appaling low wages being offered to nurses in most states even in a time of supposed "nursing shortage" (this is getting to be a joke by now...) is a clear reflection of the political powerlessness of nursing. Nursing keeps tertiary health care running night and day, through week ends, holidays, storms, earthquakes, relentlessly providing high priority- not vanity- services to society. In all fairness, there should be a premium to be paid. If there is one, it certainly does not show in the pathetic national, or state, average nursing salaries. Mrs. Butterfield blames the recession. However we don't hear or can't find evidence that physicians, PTs, OTs, are in the same straights we are now. What gives? Real professions keep a tight control on the numbers of new grads entering the profession, assuring- rather than giving false promises or hoping for- that they will have jobs and by doing so, preventing an oversupply and subsequent erosion of salaries. Not so in Nursing. Politicians sold out to anti-labor forces continue to promote the myth of "shortages" to justify grants to expand nursing programs. And nurses also continue for the most part to resist unionization and alienate themselves from opportunities for greater empowerment. That's perhaps no surprise when nursing "leaders" like Mrs. Butterfield exhort patience and submissiveness rather than direct action now.

    Your post is right on the money!

    I am currently on a travel assignment and the physicians are unionized here! So why do some nurses say "unions are not for professionals"? I could not disagree more.

    I do not believe nursing is a real profession- we have no control.
  2. by   wacberry
    I really loved that quote from Florence Nightingale. I sent it on to my boss and said I refused to be the martyr any longer.
  3. by   wacberry
    How does one go about getting a Union to come in and talk to your nurses?
  4. by   pennyaline
    Quote from wacberry
    How does one go about getting a Union to come in and talk to your nurses?
    Google is your friend!

    First, do research on unions and collective bargaining and get a feeling for some of the ins and outs of union activity. Then research unions that represent nurses. There are unions out there with names suggesting they represent only service employees or restaurant workers, but look deeper. After all of these years, as my family was exploring my mother's union pension and health insurance benefits, I discovered that her teachers union represented nurses as well. I never knew it, and she didn't either.

    Look into your own state's Nurses Association. Not all of them act as unions in terms of collective bargaining and protection of labor rights, but some do.

    At your point in the game, if you wish to meet with union representatives arrange it off employer property. Your employer cannot prevent employees from meeting with union representatives if they want to unionize. However, if their employees are not yet members of that union, employers do not have to allow those meetings on employer property! But they cannot prohibit meetings on your own property, in public spaces, in rented spaces, etc. They cannot prohibit you from meeting with a union on your own time.

    Employers have been known to threaten employees they find are considering anything to do with a union, but exploring unionization or joining a union is not a cause for termination even in an at will state and the law protects you.
  5. by   hiddencatRN
    Quote from Valerie Salva
    Your post is right on the money!

    I am currently on a travel assignment and the physicians are unionized here! So why do some nurses say "unions are not for professionals"? I could not disagree more.

    I do not believe nursing is a real profession- we have no control.
    This is so interesting, and the more I listen to arguments and hear people's experiences, the more I understand the reasoning behind going to BSN entry to advance the profession. It seems like the unfortunate reality is that "respected professions" are not ones that are highly accessible to working class people.

    And as far as unions go, I have a friend who is a union organizer for a union that represents nurses (and I know a few other union organizers too). It's quite a challenge to unionize workplaces- employers really mount a heavy campaign against them, and I see so much anti-union sentiment in general as well.
  6. by   pennyaline
    Quote from hiddencat
    This is so interesting, and the more I listen to arguments and hear people's experiences, the more I understand the reasoning behind going to BSN entry to advance the profession. It seems like the unfortunate reality is that "respected professions" are not ones that are highly accessible to working class people.
    When I was younger, I didn't see the point of going back for the BSN either. It seemed redundant, especially the clinicals. I still don't see the point of doing clinicals after years of paid work in nursing, but doing the rest of Baccalaureate work can do us no harm.



    Quote from hiddencat
    And as far as unions go, I have a friend who is a union organizer for a union that represents nurses (and I know a few other union organizers too). It's quite a challenge to unionize workplaces- employers really mount a heavy campaign against them, and I see so much anti-union sentiment in general as well.
    No one is saying it's easy, and there are negative aspects to being unionized as well as positive ones. But unions have their place, especially in this era of mega-corporations where everyone in the workplace is expendable in the pursuit of the almighty dollar. It is definitely something to think about.
  7. by   elkpark
    Quote from pennyaline
    When I was younger, I didn't see the point of going back for the BSN either. It seemed redundant, especially the clinicals. I still don't see the point of doing clinicals after years of paid work in nursing, but doing the rest of Baccalaureate work can do us no harm.
    I don't know what BSN completion programs you've been looking at, but I'm not aware of any that require med-surg or other "redundant" clinicals. Many BSN completion programs don't require any clinicals at all; others, like the one I attended, have clinicals (only) in public/community health and in management, both of which were "new" experiences for me and not a repeat of anything I had done in my original nursing program.

    Sorry for going off-topic.
  8. by   pennyaline
    Quote from elkpark
    I don't know what BSN completion programs you've been looking at, but I'm not aware of any that require med-surg or other "redundant" clinicals. Many BSN completion programs don't require any clinicals at all; others, like the one I attended, have clinicals (only) in public/community health and in management, both of which were "new" experiences for me and not a repeat of anything I had done in my original nursing program.

    Sorry for going off-topic.
    I said when I was younger, doing clinicals in a BSN program seemed redundant: if the clinicals we'd already done were good enough to graduate and get our licenses with, they were good enough for a lifetime. When I was younger, which I no longer am, that is how it seemed.

    When I was older, and clinicals were part of BSN programs, they still seemed redundant after working in clinical settings for so long. I had already done community and public health, I had already been management (neither of those were in my original program, either) and they were redundant. But they were part of the program, and being older and wiser by that time, I went along.

    Sooooo, I haven't been looking at any BSN programs for quite some time. The clinical component still seems redundant to me, even after all this time.

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