Pandemic Flu - Thread II - page 3

Frist calls for a Manhatten Project: We are so..., you know. He is telling it like it is. Does anyone really understand this? There is nothing that we can do but prepare, but no one is... Read More

  1. by   indigo girl
    Wild bird samples from Michigan undergo additional testing:
    http://birdflubreakingnews.com/templ...F10%2F0422.xml

    They always say this in all USDA releases that the H5 and N1 can be from distinct viruses.
    What they don't say is that though the confirmatory test detected low path, it does not exclude a co-infection by high path.
    Additionally, they do not indicate how many of the 51 samples were positive for H5.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Here is an article from February 2006 that actually gives a timeframe for pandemic though of course no one can predict anything for sure, and not every authority would agree:
    http://www.24dash.com/content/news/v...47&newsID=3243
    Last edit by indigo girl on Nov 1, '06
  2. by   indigo girl
    Secretive Biodefensive Legislation Moves Forward:

    http://www.ombwatch.org/article/arti.../1/1?TopicID=1

    All I can say is, good grief!!
  3. by   indigo girl
    Last edit by indigo girl on Nov 1, '06
  4. by   indigo girl
    Most of us thought that SARS happened elsewhere like China or Canada.
    How many of us were aware of the US cases? Scarey stuff...
    http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/vol10no2/pdfs/03-0752.pdf

    SARS - How a global epidemic was stopped:
    http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/about/sars.jsp
    Last edit by indigo girl on Nov 1, '06
  5. by   indigo girl
    The Flu Pandemic and You - A Canadian Guide

    Written by two physicians who experienced the SARS epidemic in Toronto:

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/pro...283155&s=books

    Quote from /www.amazon.com/gp/product/product-description/0385662777/ref=dp_proddesc_0/104-7032030-9351902?ie=UTF8&n=283155&s=books
    Toronto doctors, nurses, and other health care workers became ill along with members of the public, and some succumbed to SARS... Over 23,000 citizens of Toronto were quarantined as the infection spread.

    ... It was unsettling to be working alongside a physician colleague, and then to see her quietly excuse herself and ask for a temperature check, and a little while later to be evaluating her as a patient in an isolation room – with a fever and a cough. Fortunately, neither of us became ill, but our friends and colleagues did. ...
    Last edit by indigo girl on Oct 21, '06
  6. by   indigo girl
    MADtv: Sesame Street - Bird Flu

    You have to laugh sometimes, and this is rather funny, but definitely not for your kids:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3K8KvHxh1VI
    Last edit by indigo girl on Apr 12, '08
  7. by   indigo girl
    From John Barry, the author of "The Great Pandemic":
    http://www.cbc.ca/fifth/nextpandemic...ews_barry.html
    Quote from www.cbc.ca/fifth/nextpandemic/interviews_barry.html
    Nothing really worked in 1918, nor would it really work today. Cities passed ordinances against shaking hands, against spitting. Washing your hands constantly could work. Limiting your contact with people could obviously limit your chance of infection.

    If you were a healthy young adult, ... you were at the highest risk of dying.... Pregnant women had the highest rates of mortality - sometimes extraordinary - mortality rates.

    What were the biggest mistakes in 1918 that made things worse? Not taking influenza seriously. The second biggest mistake was that governments did not tell the truth to the public.

    I would cut down on my contacts with people. I would sit at home as much as possible with my family. I certainly wouldn’t shake hands, and I would have a large store of canned goods and bottled water and hunker down.

    Do you have your own personal supply of Tamiflu? No. Tamiflu is not an answer. The virus is one of the fastest mutating viruses in existence...
    Last edit by indigo girl on Oct 21, '06
  8. by   indigo girl
    Alaskan villagers living in the migratory pathways:

    http://www.latimes.com/news/nationwo...home-headlines
  9. by   indigo girl
    Last edit by indigo girl on Oct 22, '06
  10. by   indigo girl
    Last edit by indigo girl on Oct 22, '06
  11. by   indigo girl
    Pandemic Influenza - Risk Communication - The Teachable Moment:

    http://www.psandman.com/col/pandemic.htm#no-1


    Quote from www.psandman.com/col/pandemic.htm#no-1
    Reality check time: Nobody — nobody — is sure this will happen. Well, the experts are sure some flu strain will produce a pandemic eventually, but they don’t know which and they don’t know when and they don’t know how bad it will be.

    Still, the majority of the world’s virologists, epidemiologists, and infectious disease experts are trembling in fearful anticipation of the epidemiologic equivalent of Code Red: “Pandemic Imminent.” The absence of dissenting voices is stunning. On most risk issues, the experts are loudly divided. Most of them think global warming is real and eating too much cholesterol is harmful, but it won’t take you two minutes on the Web to find respectable experts who disagree. Not on pandemic flu.
    Last edit by indigo girl on Oct 22, '06
  12. by   indigo girl
    Malawi:
    http://www.nationmalawi.com/articles...rticleID=19204

    Angola:
    http://www.angolapress-angop.ao/noticia-e.asp?ID=482051
    They are just talking about this now?

    Australia:
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems...0/s1771730.htm
    Quote from www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200610/s1771730.htm
    we're still concerned that the global epidemic is continuing and that ... the epidemic has come closer to Australia through Indonesia," he said.
    "So that's a concern that we have to keep our vigilance and keep monitoring wild birds in through northern Australia."
    Last edit by indigo girl on Oct 23, '06
  13. by   indigo girl
    The use of "humanized" avian flu antibodies:

    http://www.wcax.com/Global/story.asp...menu183_12_3_3
    Quote from /www.wcax.com/Global/story.asp?S=5536979&nav=menu183_12_3_3
    The biggest limitation of the humanized antibody is that "it recognizes only a small portion of the virus," said Webby, who works at St. Jude. "If the virus changes only a little bit, it might not be effective. We have to look at how this antibody works against the variants that are out there in Africa and the Middle East."
    Last edit by indigo girl on Oct 23, '06

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