NurseWeek Hires Union Buster as VP

  1. Nurse Week has hired Judee Berg, as the Vice President of Professional Services. This so called "nursing leader" was instrumental in destroying the nursing department at Cottage Hospital and engaged in major union busting activities (CNA) in consultation with the infamous Burke Group. She was the Vice President of Nursing at the time and after months of not listening to the nurses, they finally decided to organize. It got ugly! After it was all over, Judee Berg and the CEO "resigned" or were asked to leave. Judee is very loyal to the hospital industry and has even given talks on how to bust up union activities. I have proceeded to throw NurseWeek in the trash!

    http://www.nurseweek.com/edNote/04/121304_judeeberg.asp

    I have to laugh after reading her comments about the nurse/patient ratio bill, which the CNA was instrumental in fighting for. She did nothing but bash the CNA!!
    Last edit by fiestynurse on Dec 24, '04
  2. Visit fiestynurse profile page

    About fiestynurse

    Joined: Mar '01; Posts: 1,012; Likes: 36

    45 Comments

  3. by   NRSKarenRN
    Thanks for the post. VERY interesting development.
  4. by   sharann
    :uhoh21: I am not happy to read this even though my hosp is not unionized. I am still pro-unions.
  5. by   Spidey's mom
    Nursing should be big enough for all persuasions. I'm not a union fan. I would never join one. It would be nice to have someone who thinks as I do around although I'm not familiar with Judee Berg.

    One of the things I've noticed since becoming a nurse 6 years ago at 40 ... nursing seems predominately "liberal" so to speak. I've felt like my own thoughts and beliefs were not represented well.

    I will have to read more about her . . . I only read the article posted. I haven't read anything about her "bashing" CNA or siding only with the hospitals so I'll have to search that out.

    steph
  6. by   teeituptom
    She is entitled to be a union buster and CNA critic if she chooses
  7. by   fiestynurse
    I just want readers to be informed that NurseWeek is not pro-union and frequently makes negative statements regarding the CNA. It's generally hidden in the text of some article, but it is there. NurseWeek relies heavily on the hospitals for their advertising.

    The thing about Judee Berg is that she did nothing to advocate for nurses, while working as the VP. Shared Governance was finally implemented only after the threat of the union was upon her. Staffing was cut and nurses were not listened to. I personally sat in on a meeting where she picked at her nails and generally spaced out when nurses were speaking about thier concerns regarding floating. Her attitude was "a nurse is a nurse." When asked if she could float and function on a med/surg unit, since she was also a nurse, she responded that she could. She hadn't practiced at the bedside for years. Everyone knew that was BS and it showed how out of touch she was with the staff.

    Yes, she has the right to her opinion, but I have the right to throw NurseWeek in the trash for what it represents.
  8. by   UM Review RN
    I appreciate the information, fiestynurse. I guess that we'll have to see what happens to Spectrum with its acquisition of NurseWeek.
  9. by   fiestynurse
    Watch out for the good old girls club.
  10. by   teeituptom
    Quote from fiestynurse
    Watch out for the good old girls club.

    I will definitely keep and eye out for the G.O.G.C.
  11. by   fiestynurse
    I was a bedside nurse for 20 years and even though I have worked my way up the ladder, I never forget where I came from. I see too many so called nursing leaders, who will not speak-up for nursing when the going gets tough because they are too concerned about their own careers and jobs.

    I spend a lot of time talking to nurses on a regular basis. I say it as I see it and I will advocate for changes when necessary. I rarely will come down on a fellow nurse, but some people need to be called on their crap. I don't ever even remember Judee Berg walking through my nursing unit, let alone actually engaging in conversation with any staff nurses.

    I find it interesting that one of NurseWeek's nurse of the Year was one of Judee Berg's friends from the Nursing Leadership Organization that she has belonged to for years. Hmmm. Good old Girls club alive and kicking. I'll scratch your back if you'll scratch mine.
  12. by   UM Review RN
    I was a bedside nurse for 20 years and even though I have worked my way up the ladder, I never forget where I came from.
    I admire that. Nursing leadership is there to lead nurses, not oppose them.
  13. by   imenid37
    Quote from fiestynurse
    I was a bedside nurse for 20 years and even though I have worked my way up the ladder, I never forget where I came from. I see too many so called nursing leaders, who will not speak-up for nursing when the going gets tough because they are too concerned about their own careers and jobs.

    I spend a lot of time talking to nurses on a regular basis. I say it as I see it and I will advocate for changes when necessary. I rarely will come down on a fellow nurse, but some people need to be called on their crap. I don't ever even remember Judee Berg walking through my nursing unit, let alone actually engaging in conversation with any staff nurses.

    I find it interesting that one of NurseWeek's nurse of the Year was one of Judee Berg's friends from the Nursing Leadership Organization that she has belonged to for years. Hmmm. Good old Girls club alive and kicking. I'll scratch your back if you'll scratch mine.
    ITA. Nurse manager is an oxymoron in many cases. It is very hard to be both nurse and mnager. Usually the manager side wins and they try to cram "pt./nurse hostile" policies down our throats. All in the name of the almighty $ and their own advancement. There are some great nurse leaders, but there are many many more brown-nosers in these jobs than there are decent folks. Often nurse w/ a few years of experience are flattered by the "higher-ups" and molded into these positions. I have seen many well-seasoned nurses passed over for promotion in favour of the "it" girl or guy of the moment. I personally think it's because management latches onto these people to further their own agenda. More experienced staff may be too loyal to the pt's or staff to implement policies which are detrimental to pt's or staff. The person looking out for #1 is willing to do what it takes to push themselves ahead. Again, not everyone in these positions fits this bill, but many do.
  14. by   VickyRN
    Thank you for the information.

close