Nurses to feel pain of layoffs

  1. NEW MILFORD -- Registered nurse Joanne Chapin is afraid New Milford Hospital administration's cost-cutting decision to lay off 22 employees and reduce hours for four others will not only hurt those losing jobs but the hospital's reputation as a good place to work.

    After negotiations with administrators, the nurses' union president said Wednesday it appears one full-time operating room nurse and a part-time blood collection nurse will lose their jobs, six will be forced to take reduced hours and at least two will have to switch from day to midnight shifts. In total, the hospital administration is reducing the nursing staff by 122 hours in endoscopy, one-day surgery, cardiac rehabilitation, the operating room, clinical resource management and the autologous blood department.


    "In the nursing community, this really hurts our reputation, and that's something we are going to have to work to overcome,'' said Chapin, a 15-year veteran who represents the hospital's 175 full- and part-time nursing staff. Skilled nurses are in demand, and this layoff could adversely affect future recruitment, she said.


    The hospital administration disagrees. Administration officials said this week they are still seeking staff for select positions, and regularly accept applications from experienced nurses and other personnel. Five clerical and secretarial staff who are losing jobs will have an opportunity to be moved into vacancies in other departments, officials said.

    Full Story: Nurses to feel pain of layoffs [Danbury News Times,CT]
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    8 Comments

  3. by   PeachPie
    Wow, everyone's always talking about a nursing shortage. Pfft.
  4. by   PANurseRN1
    How many of the "pumps and pearls" nurses are being laid off? I must have missed that.
  5. by   OC_An Khe
    PeachPie,
    The current nursing shortage is not in the numbers of RNs available but in the number of RNs willing to work in the circumstances/ working conditions, that most hospitals offer. In the future as the demand for Nursing care increases and the absolute numbers of RNs decreases ( due to aging workforce and retirements) then the real pain of the shortage will begin to be felt.
  6. by   barbyann
    These nurses will be gobbled up by the surrounding hospitals. My hospital (in CT) recently went through "structure changes". The PTB think they are making wise budgetary decisions but the impact on morale is huge. No one likes to see their co-workers treated as pawns in a big chess game. Another example of disconnect between them and us.
  7. by   CHATSDALE
    the nurses that are being let go will find something else..hopefully in a field that they want but the patients will have overworked nurses

    i just can't believe that they will find a place for the support staff in other parts of the hospital they are being let go to save money new jobs in the hospital will be given to new people who will come aboard at a cheaper pay rate and the ones with seniority will be shown the door
  8. by   Storyteller06
    The nurses at NMH are unionized. We have the bargaining unit behind us with clear language on layoffs, bumping and recall. The layoffs aren't neccesarily in our acute care units. OF the 2 positions on the med/surg floor that are supposed to be bumped to nights, a ft nurse has resigned, only one will be required to go to nights. We currently only have 2 or 3 openings for RN staff and 2 of them are specialty areas, which require experience.

    Now for the non-RN staff, there are staff with 23 and more years of service to the hospital. They are feeling the pain (well maybe). Those people do have first dibs at the 4 or 5 openings that had been frozen. Some will get a half year of pay and then go on to retire.

    What is crazy is that this hospital has 6 VPs!!!!!
  9. by   CharityRN
    LONG TIME READER, FIRST TIME POSTER> I am a new grad, Jan 06 thanks to Katrina! I was more than glad to escape from NO, LA standards when my b/f got his residency here in Austin. I thought CERTAINLY IT CAN'T BE WORSE! And in one way, I was right! It wasn't worse, but it wasn't all the peaches and roses I thought nursing was going to be or suppose to be. I switched from night shift to day shift and learned that pt's are numbers, and not based on acuity. As long as you have RN behind your name, the hospital will push you until you break. Mind you, after only working there a few weeks I was contacted by NNOC (an organization for RN's, why not ALL nurses I don't know???) But still, it spoke volumes to me. The hospital I work for has put a "freeze" on hiring LVN/LPN nurses and has resorted to hiring foreign RN nurses. But, based on another blog I read it seems that avenue may be closing for them as well. Anyway, now, after living here only 3 months, I have decided to give up on floor nursing for awhile and test the waters in Home Health. The sad part is, I really liked my job, when I was able to do it aptly and safely. I hope with the "sqeeze" that the hospitals are starting to feel they will make the right changes, and follow Ca suit. Until then, I (and others) will wait!
  10. by   Nemhain
    Quote from ocankhe
    PeachPie,
    The current nursing shortage is not in the numbers of RNs available but in the number of RNs willing to work in the circumstances/ working conditions, that most hospitals offer. In the future as the demand for Nursing care increases and the absolute numbers of RNs decreases ( due to aging workforce and retirements) then the real pain of the shortage will begin to be felt.
    Right On!

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