Nurse Told She Is Too Obese To Move To New Zealand - page 4

source: nurse told she is too obese to move to new zealand one thing that stood out to me in the article: nz nurses work 60-hour weeks?!... Read More

  1. by   ~Mi Vida Loca~RN
    Quote from kiwipsychnurse
    To the person that said NZ was ranked 2nd, where is your evidence.
    Here is mine and it says we are ranked 7th behind Australia : http://www.nationmaster.com/graph/he...health-obesity

    Although Time mag says Australia beats the USA :http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/lif...60.ece?pgnum=3

    I read it last night on a New Zealand information site, I will try to find it again. I also made it a point to say it was something I had just came across so was trying to give reason to why maybe this immigration law was there because some were trying to say it was a Gender issue and so on. Saying had it been a male it wouldn't have happend. I wasn't trying to put down the country, I find NZ to be a very beautiful country that I would love to visit some day.

    Ok I can't find it, I will keep looking, It was one of the first few search results I came across but I did like 8 different key word searches and I went to the PC history and it's showing nothing. I am guessing it was set to delete daily.

    I do know the site was a NZ Information site, where it showed all kinds of info about the country, and immigration laws. Then it showed charts and graphs of ranks or gender and age and obesity and it went on to say NZ was ranked second to America and because of it's own residents being such a drain on the Health Care system it set the laws in place to immigrants adding to it. I think it was talking about Industrialized nations. I am sure the information varies on who you ask but being that this was a site talking about the country and the laws and any info you could possible need on the country, I just assumed it might know what it was talking about in regards to it's people. If I find it again I will post it.
    Last edit by ~Mi Vida Loca~RN on May 4, '09
  2. by   twow
    there sure is a lot of institutionalized intolerance in nz
  3. by   ~Mi Vida Loca~RN
    You know, I really don't understand all the uproar, NZ doesn't need to conform to American laws, or run their Country as America does. They have every right to pick and choose who they let become a resident there for those not born there. We would never let some other country try to dictate our laws to us, yet we have no problem trying to dictate how other countries should be ran.

    They have enough financial hardships on their health care system from their own obese residents. Therefor they do not want to let and have to deal with more. They have that right. I don't think that makes them intolerant, I think it makes them smart for putting their own countries problems first before doing what is politically correct. IMO
  4. by   twow
    thanks for clearing that up. discrimination is ok, as long as it's in another country. good point.
  5. by   ANnot4me
    Obesity is a problem in NZ as well as the sequelae. As in the US and other countries, it is more of a problem in minority persons. Here it is some Pacific Islanders and the Maori people. Maori are indigineous, but Pacific Islanders must immigrate and many do so at an older age to live with children already here. So obesity can be a drain on the healthcare system. A medical certification is required to migrate here and be covered under a permit that entitles the immigrant to health coverage. It includes tests for HIV, hepatitis and tuberculosis; weight is also a consideration and that is transparent in the policy.

    Obesity is an issue here as is healthcare costs. Per the Economic Survey
    of New Zealand, 2009 by the OECD:

    New Zealand achieves relatively good health outcomes for comparatively
    modest health-care outlays.
    Also from the same report:
    Rising health-care costs are the biggest threat to long-run fiscal sustainability. Health spending has grown rapidly over the last decade without significant increases in health outputs.
    Also,
    Whereas New Zealand had a higher living standard than the average OECD New Zealand country in the early 1970s, relatively low labour productivity growth since living standards then has opened up a large income gap relative to the OECD average and even greater one with leading countries such as the United States.
    Finally re: wages for doctors and nurses,
    New Zealand is quite constrained in how much it can control medical professionals' wage costs because of its open market for their skills. A high proportion of locally trained doctors and nurses emigrate, while around half of all practicing doctors and nurses in New Zealand are foreign-trained immigrants. Heavy turnover of immigrant professionals implies
    large recruitment and training costs, however, along with greater risks of
    shortages. Imminent ageing of the doctor and nurse populations implies
    a scarcity of future capacity, against which sharply rising demands on the
    system would greatly increase cost inflation.
    The sixty hour work week here referred to the nurses hours in the UK. Many nurses here work overtime too. The representations that nurses earn a good wage here is refuted in the OECD report. Furthermore, the top wage for a bedside nurse without any mangement level designation is NZD 65,000 plus shift differentials and holidays worked (holiday pay is already figured into that wage). To earn NZD 90,000 would require a nurse to work many nights, weekends and public holidays. I feel the postings in regard to wage are off topic and may be placed here in interests other than the original postings.
  6. by   wonderbee
    Quote from Kashia
    Not meaning to be harsh but as health care professionals, how can we inspire, teach, or promote wellness and health if we are not healthy ourselves?
    If I just arrived on this planet and saw two groups of beings. One group was obese with related dis-ease and the other healthy in mind body and spirit. Both are
    representing "health and wellness".....
    Who would you be more open to hearing?

    I think it is time for health care professionals to stop being an example of why you need medical intervention and begin walking the talk.
    I applaud New Zealand for recognizing an imminent health liability.
    Working 12 hour plus shifts, mandations, no meal breaks, abusive, sometimes violent patients and uber stress doesn't sound like a lifestyle that promotes wellness either. Just being realistic.
  7. by   Cinqly
    Quote from ~Mi Vida Loca~
    Seems the weight issue has been an ongoing thing, I found this article about a spouse denied because of their weight and an explanation.

    http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,312056,00.html

    Searching New Zealand BMI immigration brought up tons of info on it and a message board for immigrants which talked about denials and further tests and medical waivers and so on.
    I have always thought that BMI is one of the stupidest measurements ever invented. It really indicates nothing about a person's actual body composition. A BMI of 35 on paper can look like an "obese" person with extra fat around the middle or a "body-builder" with not an ounce of fat but lots muscle. One pound of muscle takes up about the space of a tennis ball, while comparably one pound of fat takes up the size of a grapefruit. So, BMI, which is based solely on height and weight, cannot be deemed an accurate measure of body composition. It is, in my opinion, a useless measurement and should be stricken from humanity. A better solution would be to utilize body composition measurements, which take into account the amount of fat measured from various areas to create a fat to muscle ratio. There are several methods that can calculate, with good accuracy, body composition. Of course, they'll never do this because these methods, although accurate, are more expensive and require actual initiative. It's much cheaper to use a faulted measurement method to save would-be dollars for a not-yet-determined illnesses.

    If New Zealand is truly wanting to prevent obesity and "fat"-related health problems, should they not also bar the "skinny fat" people from entering the country? These are the people with a normal BMI that do not have any muscle, eat like crap, and have never exercised a day in their life. I hate to say it, but when it comes to being healthy weight is NOT always the best indicator! I'm not saying they should change their policy, but it would be interesting to see the results if it was enforced more accurately.
  8. by   ~Mi Vida Loca~RN
    Quote from twow
    thanks for clearing that up. discrimination is ok, as long as it's in another country. good point.
    Oh is that what I said? icon_roll
  9. by   ~Mi Vida Loca~RN
    Quote from cinqly
    I have always thought that BMI is one of the stupidest measurements ever invented. It really indicates nothing about a person's actual body composition. A BMI of 35 on paper can look like an "obese" person with extra fat around the middle or a "body-builder" with not an ounce of fat but lots muscle. One pound of muscle takes up about the space of a tennis ball, while comparably one pound of fat takes up the size of a grapefruit. So, BMI, which is based solely on height and weight, cannot be deemed an accurate measure of body composition. It is, in my opinion, a useless measurement and should be stricken from humanity. A better solution would be to utilize body composition measurements, which take into account the amount of fat measured from various areas to create a fat to muscle ratio. There are several methods that can calculate, with good accuracy, body composition. Of course, they'll never do this because these methods, although accurate, are more expensive and require actual initiative. It's much cheaper to use a faulted measurement method to save would-be dollars for a not-yet-determined illnesses.

    If New Zealand is truly wanting to prevent obesity and "fat"-related health problems, should they not also bar the "skinny fat" people from entering the country? These are the people with a normal BMI that do not have any muscle, eat like crap, and have never exercised a day in their life. I hate to say it, but when it comes to being healthy weight is NOT always the best indicator! I'm not saying they should change their policy, but it would be interesting to see the results if it was enforced more accurately.

    I am not a fan of the BMI scale myself. When I was a size 6 I was considered obese on the BMI scale. I have a curvy body, good muscle definition, and big boobs. I tend to weight a lot more than I look. People are usually surprised when I get weighed at the Dr. office because I weigh a lot. There is no way I was even remotely obese when I was a size 6, yet according to the BMI scale alone I was.

    My husband is skinny, he has musle but he is very thing, I would hate to see his LDL levels though, he eats terrible. He just happens to have a super fast metabolism.

    I think a lot more should be taken into consideration then just BMI.

    From what I read though on the NZ immigration forum I saw is that if you come back to high on the BMI scale and to big in your waist circumfrense, (I guess they do both) you have to go on for further medical tests. I am not sure what those tests are. There are also medical exemptions you can get as well from what I read.
  10. by   ~Mi Vida Loca~RN
    Quote from twow
    thanks for clearing that up. discrimination is ok, as long as it's in another country. good point.
    You know it's funny, or really it's not. Immigrants come here and want to start changing policies to not discriminate against them and their beliefs, many Americans band together with the "if you don't like it leave" mentality. Saying that if you choose to live in America you have to adapt to American ways, which discrimination is a huge part of American society. I have seen it first hand my whole life. After 9/11 how many people were shouting to round up Muslims and to put a stop to allowing Muslim immigrants from coming over. We didn't want to take the risk that one of them could be a terrorist. So in our minds, it was Ok to discriminate to protect OUR country. Of course not EVERYONE had this mentality but it was a huge number, at least half of America if not more. Yet we are the first to cry foul when the same thing happens in another country, as if, America is the staple of the only real way to live. We are the epitome of morals and rights and freedoms and so on. *note the sarcasm*. It's discrimination in America (although that really just depends on who you ask). NZ has set up the laws, not to try and put down overweight people, but to try and keep their health system from going belly up. They are trying to protect their country.

    But of course we can't ever see it in that light.

    I am sorry, actually I am not sorry, I don't think I have ever seen a more hypocritical country than America. Yes I am American, and no I am not going to leave because I don't agree with everything America stands for. I am very thankful for many things my country has to offer, at the same time I am ashamed of many of the attitudes my country represents!
    Last edit by ~Mi Vida Loca~RN on May 4, '09
  11. by   tntrn
    I wonder if NZ bars heavy smokers...or heavy drinkers...or diabetics...or----
  12. by   tinkerbell1963
    Quote from Kashia
    Not meaning to be harsh but as health care professionals, how can we inspire, teach, or promote wellness and health if we are not healthy ourselves?
    If I just arrived on this planet and saw two groups of beings. One group was obese with related dis-ease and the other healthy in mind body and spirit. Both are
    representing "health and wellness".....
    Who would you be more open to hearing?

    I think it is time for health care professionals to stop being an example of why you need medical intervention and begin walking the talk.
    I applaud New Zealand for recognizing an imminent health liability.

    Just because someone has a weight problem doesnt mean they are unhealthy

    My sister is what most would class as healthy because she fits the normal and she has high blood pressure high cholesterol and was just diagnosed with Type two diabetes
    then there is me FAT yes not affraid of the word BP normal Cholesterol Normal my only issue I am far from what society calls normal because I am FAT

    Dont judge a book by its cover FAT doesnt mean sick and falling apart
  13. by   KateRN1
    Quote from BabyLady
    8. Kuwait 74.2...pop: 3,399,699...considering their women aren't hardly permitted to leave the house, I can easily see this one being high.
    Totally off topic,but . . . . Wow, what an odd thing to say. Don't know much about Kuwait, do you?

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