Medical bills underlie 60 percent of U.S. bankruptcies: study - page 4

Medical bills underlie 60 percent of U.S. bankruptcies: study Source... Read More

  1. by   heron
    Quote from CRNA2007
    what generic medicines are costing you over $500/month?
    I can't answer for lamazeteacher, but when my partner was alive and before she could be covered under domestic partner benefits, she was paying $550/month for: verapamil, metformin, albuterol inhaler, asmacort inhaler. The asmacort alone cost $188 for one month's prescription.

    During our relationship, she started neurontin prn for neuropathic pain. I took a look at the total price for the prescription ... $210 for 180 200 mg caps. Nope, nothing cheap about generic drugs.
  2. by   oxford_girl
    Truth about drug companies
    http://www.nybooks.com/articles/17244

    Prices have skyrocketed because it's market driven. There is no government agency that tells them to limit the prices.
  3. by   blue note
    What happens when chain pharmacies buy up insurance companies

    The Hausers, both over 65 and on Medicare, used to get their medicines from Pike's Pharmacy, an independent drugstore in east Charlotte.

    In January, they switched their prescription drug plan, and in March they started going to CVS at the suggestion of their new insurer.

    They soon noticed that the new insurance plan, which is owned by CVS, pays the chain drugstore more for drugs than it paid Pike's.

    The disparity is not only unfair to Pike's, the Hausers say. It will also end up costing millions of senior citizens more because it will put them in the so-called "doughnut hole" much faster.

    That's the point at which seniors enrolled in Medicare Part D have purchased prescription drugs worth a certain amount of money - $2,700 is common. Then, the insurer temporarily stops paying any of the cost until a catastrophic cap is reached. While in that "doughnut hole," seniors pay 100 percent of their drug costs instead of small co-payments....

    ...when the Hausers received reports of their drug expenses from RxAmerica, their primary prescription drug plan, they were shocked to see the difference between reimbursements to Pike's and CVS.

    For example, when Pike filled Max Hauser's prescription for omeprazole, a generic drug for ulcers, in January and February, Pike's received $4.77 from RxAmerica for each 30-day supply, and Caremark reimbursed the Hausers for a $5 co-pay, for a total of $9.77 for a month's supply.

    In March, when the Hausers took their prescriptions to CVS, RxAmerica paid the chain drugstore $62.59 for the same 30-day supply of omeprazole. Caremark paid the Hausers' $5 co-pay, for a total of $67.59 for the month's supply.

    CVS got $57.82 more for omeprazole than Pike's Pharmacy.

    In another example, CVS received $165.99 for a 90-day supply of simvastatin, a generic cholesterol medicine, from RxAmerica, and a $15 co-pay from Caremark. Pike's Pharmacy filled a 30-day prescription and received only a $4.70 co-pay from Hauser and nothing from RxAmerica.

    The difference in charges put Max Hauser that much closer to the so-called "doughnut hole."
  4. by   FireStarterRN
    Quote from heron
    I can't answer for lamazeteacher, but when my partner was alive and before she could be covered under domestic partner benefits, she was paying $550/month for: verapamil, metformin, albuterol inhaler, asmacort inhaler. The asmacort alone cost $188 for one month's prescription.

    During our relationship, she started neurontin prn for neuropathic pain. I took a look at the total price for the prescription ... $210 for 180 200 mg caps. Nope, nothing cheap about generic drugs.
    Wow, those are common medicines!

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