Immigration: More Foreign Nurses Needed? - page 5

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  1. by   javaline
    ghillbert you seriously need to get over yourself. You come across as being better or above the the new grad and I'm sorry to burst your bubble but you are not!! Yes, you have the experience, but that doesn't make you better than anyone. It's funny how the experienced nurses tend to forget what it was like to be a new grad. We, US nurses, simply want to be given the opportunity/chance to prove ourselves before being pushed aside for a foreign nurse.
  2. by   Skeletor
    Quote from ghillbert
    You are absolutely correct - whatever the system, someone will work out a way to exploit it. It only bothers me when this is assumed to be the rule, rather than exception.


    It is impolite and ignorant to speak in a different language than your colleagues in any situation. However - not all foreign nurses are deficient in english... some of us are even native english speakers!


    I'm sure it's an issue. However, nursing is a transient profession. People come and go. Particularly from Australia, because it's so remote, a lot of people go overseas for more varied experienced with a bigger population. But most people come back, for quality of life issues, after gaining that experience. I think that can only be a positive thing for the profession. Global experiences are enriching and valuable in my opinion - advancing your professional status and taking it home seems smart to me.


    Yes, I probably do have a big chip on my shoulder with regard to this issue. Blanket statements such as "the foreign nurse will have to learn the language, the foreign nurse will have to learn how to get to and from work"... and "in essence, the foreign nurse is on the same scale as a new grad" are ignorant and incorrect. Generalizations usually are.

    In an ideal world, would americans rather that there were NO foreign nurses - do you not think there is a wide world out there, with valuable lessons to be learned from your international counterparts? Nursing is a team sport, and learning from others - to me - is a great thing.

    Honestly - I am very logical and reasoned as a rule. However as a foreign nurse who is a native english speaker and very highly specialized in my field, who was recruited to the US, it bothers me to see statements like some of the ones in this thread. I am gaining knowledge and experience in the US, but I am *not* equivalent to a new grad.

    If you're going to quote my words, at least be honest and not add in your own words: "blah blah blah."

    Real mature
  3. by   hossridr
    I have worked with many foreign nurses - mainly Filipino - and observed a few traits. First is the fact that these nurses tend to form cliques and speak in their own dialect, while other nurses not of the same culture are present. This is especially prevalent when foreign nurses are angry or are talking about other nurses not of the same dialect. These same nurses will manipulate and lobby for their brethren and god-forbid if they get into a position of power! I have seen nepotism and favoritism at it's worst when practiced by these nurses. Secondly, the English these nurses speak in their home countries is many times different than the English we speak here in the US. As a result, communication suffers and mistakes involving patient-care can be made.

    I lived in the Philippines for a year. During that time I witnessed a lot of graft and corruption. I have first-hand knowledge of students "buying" their degrees, either in cash or in other bartering ways. While it's true that these foreign "nurses" may have the proper paperwork to enter this country and also to take the CGFNS and NCLEX,etc. the fact remains is their "degree" legitimate? With enough study an LVN could potentially pass the NCLEX and then the state boards.

    Like others have said in this thread, newly=minted US grads have an uphill climb to get their foot in the door. The excuse by some hospitals that they need "experienced" nurses is poppycock. Even "experienced" nurses need to be oriented to a new hospital setting. No, the bottome line is that these foreign nurses will work cheaper, not rock the bo Able to analyze and assess an inrnate/inmate-patient to determine what state of
    mind he is in.
    . Able to conduct classes relating to inmate-patient therapy.
    . Am experienced in emergency medicine and can act accordingly to
    emergency medical situations both independently or under direction.
    . Have over 40 years of medical experience in a variety of medical settings.
    at, patronize their supervisors and do whatever it takes to get what they want.

    Another solution I have in regards to the nursing shortage is wny not let LVN's take the NCLEX exam or equivalency?
  4. by   horselover1
    WE DO NOT NEED MORE FOREIGN NURSES, WE ARE IN AMERICA. This is why jobs are being cut, we have people from other countries that will WORK much cheaper!
  5. by   tempest
    My preceptor in my last semester was from Mexico. She had a BSN and spoke 4 languages. She was the best "teacher" I had in all of nursing school, including all of my clinicals. If I was a patient, I would MUCH rather have her monitoring me than a new grad from any country!
  6. by   IdreamofNursing
    As a new graduate RN(December 2008, NCLEX passed 2009) who applied for and was sent a very nice denial email from El Centro Regional Medical Center, Mr. Moore's comments have made my jaw drop.

    Like many new graduate RN's who are struggling to find employment, I find this article both frustrating and saddening. For the record, there are nurses willing and able to relocate out of big counties and move to cities like El Centro. If administrators and managers refuse to hire them because of lack of experience, then that is another issue.

    Sincerely,
    Desperately seeking employment in CA
  7. by   MissLouda
    Quote from EmilyLucille523
    Then give us new grads a chance to get the experience needed in that area first. We are not dumb, we can figure it out.
    I totally agree... We as new grads are willing to learn, willing to relocate, and willing to sacrifice to get those vital nursing skills "in the bag." If they would rather spend money to bring foreign nurses over instead of training new grads, such as myself, then that is a damn shame. America should be looking after our own people before offering the jobs that WE need to other countries.... Are new grads really that undesirable? It is becoming ridiculous already!!!
  8. by   sweetpari
    hi everyone..i don't know what exactly the situation in US but it will be a sad news for all the foreign nurses who have cleared their NCLEX exams and are waiting for the last 2yrs or so..to get moving there..also whose immigration processing is alomst at the last stage.. i guess there must be some cut off or something that should imply from which year the import will be stopped so that those nurses and even new grads of other countries can look for options beside US.:wink2:
    Last edit by sirI on Jun 25, '09
  9. by   Ginger's Mom
    Quote from IdreamofNursing
    As a new graduate RN(December 2008, NCLEX passed 2009) who applied for and was sent a very nice denial email from El Centro Regional Medical Center, Mr. Moore's comments have made my jaw drop.

    Like many new graduate RN's who are struggling to find employment, I find this article both frustrating and saddening. For the record, there are nurses willing and able to relocate out of big counties and move to cities like El Centro. If administrators and managers refuse to hire them because of lack of experience, then that is another issue.

    Sincerely,
    Desperately seeking employment in CA
    I would contact your Congressman, how can El Centro petition 20 foreign nurses and deny a US nurse a job. I would ask your Congressman to look at the Federal Funds sent to this hospital and withhold them until they employ citizens,.

    I would also contact your Governor's of and request the same for state funds.
  10. by   DolceVita
    Quote from javaline
    ghillbert you seriously need to get over yourself. You come across as being better or above the the new grad and I'm sorry to burst your bubble but you are not!! Yes, you have the experience, but that doesn't make you better than anyone. It's funny how the experienced nurses tend to forget what it was like to be a new grad. We, US nurses, simply want to be given the opportunity/chance to prove ourselves before being pushed aside for a foreign nurse.
    You are dead wrong. An experienced nurse is better skilled than a new graduate. ghillbert was not saying he was a better person for goodness sake.

    If, as a new grad, you really think you are interchangeable with an experienced nurse then you really are going to have problems at work. If, as a new grad, you think that you are interchangeable with a foreign nurse who is experience, simply because they are foreign, I would say that smacks of racism. I get that there are some on this site who do think that.

    As for those who think it is rude for people to speak in a foreign language at work -- clearly you need to get out more and travel some. I cannot imagine that there are many instances of a foreign nurse speaking their native language over a patient and when it happens they should be counseled. But if they speak it in the hallway, the breakroom, the storeroom...really who cares? Exactly HOW does that hurt you?
  11. by   Akinna
    Quote from Alexk49
    I would contact your Congressman, how can El Centro petition 20 foreign nurses and deny a US nurse a job. I would ask your Congressman to look at the Federal Funds sent to this hospital and withhold them until they employ citizens,.

    I would also contact your Governor's of and request the same for state funds.
    This is the letter responding for new grad employment.
    Looks like when one has a valid RN license they will consider to hire.

    Thank you for the letter, and your interest of
    > employment at El Centro Regional Medical Center. I am
    > one of the Recruiters for our hospital, and I would like to answer
    > your questions.
    > El Centro Hospital does hire new grad nurses.
    > The first criteria for new grad nurses are: All new RN grads
    > are required to have completed their nursing boards, and retain a California RN
    > License, before the Director of the department in which they hold interest for
    > employment are interviewed.
    2. When the new Grad has his/her RN license , they

    > must apply online, for an RN position at ecrmc.org.
    > The application for the position they have applied to, comes directly to
    > me. I will review your application, and if it meets our criteria, I will pass it
    > to the
    > Director. They will then decide if your skill set is
    > what they are seeking, and will call you for an interview. The
    > decision to offer employment is made by the Department Director.
    > The Recruiting office will contact you by phone at this point.
    > Please understand, El Centro Regional Hospital, is interested in all RN's,
    > who hold a California RN license, whether they have years of
    > experience, or have just passed their RN Boards. Please remember, not all
    > RN's are always hired as they may indeed not "have the right
    > fit" for the position in which they are seeking. When you have
    > your California RN license, please apply online to the positions you are
    > interested in, so we can start the interview process for you. I am very
    > pleased you have shown interest in ECRMC, and am here for you, to answer your
    > questions, concerns for
    > employment, Mon-Friday, 0830 to 1730.
    >
    >
  12. by   inomadness
    there are thousands of traveling nurses who want to work but can't because companies only care about the bottom line. don't give me this crap about a nursing shortage
  13. by   hossridr
    As for those who think it is rude for people to speak in a foreign language at work -- clearly you need to get out more and travel some. I cannot imagine that there are many instances of a foreign nurse speaking their native language over a patient and when it happens they should be counseled. But if they speak it in the hallway, the breakroom, the storeroom...really who cares? Exactly HOW does that hurt you?
    It is rude, no question about it, especially when you know they are talking about you or me or anyone else! I have experienced this on many occasions and will not hesitate to call them on it. They get ****** off and cry discrimination, and then go running to their nursing sup. who they've kissed ass with their entire career. I will tell the sup. too that I don't appreciate them speaking in their dialect in front of me. The national language is E N G L I S H in this country. It's the lingo we need to use in a hospital or clinic setting to C O M M U N I C A T E. Not everyone knows how to speak Tagalog or Spanish, for example. If hospitals become increasingly Balkanized, in regards to language, God help us all. Getting out more has nothing to do with the workplace. The problem I see with foreign nurses - especially Filipinos - is the arrogance they display in this regard. They should be thankful they were allowed to obtain a visa to work here, yet they show their appreciation by not respecting the language nor the customs in this country. They are here for one thing and one thing only......the God-Almighty dollar.

    Those of you who are complaining about foreign "nurses" entering this country and taking your jobs need to write your senator's and congressmen. I have. I'm not sure how much good it has done, if any, but if enough of us write them a letter it surely will have an effect.

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